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Full text of "Pacific fireman"

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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 03475 3625 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 





IREMAN 







VOL. X.-NO. 19 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Shakeup in Cincinnati Department. 

Recent charges in the Cincinnati 
Fire Department, it is said, were but 
a forerunner for a greater shake-up. 
Several secret conferences have been 
held with this end in view. The 
shake-up will be justified on the 
grounds of greater efficiency. It is 
said that about 75 men are to be let go, 
and a "survey" of the department is 
now being made for that purpose. 
The introduction of automobiles for 
engines, it is pointed out, will provide 
opportunity for cutting down each 
company one man, because stokers or 
firemen will not be needed. In com- 
panies where this is not done, some 
other reason will begiven for "picking 
off" a man here and there. On this 
item alone, it is proposed to make a 
saving of more than $100,000 a year. 
The names of those singled out for 
dismissal have been carefully guarded. 
In order to get discipline the rule on 
absence from the engine house is now 
so strict that if a man steps out for 
five minutes he must register in what 
las become known as the "log book," 
is time of leaving and return. 

Start Truck With Alarm. 

Chief Chase of the Miami, Fla., de- 
jartment, is inventing an appliance 
which will starta truck with the same 
current that brought in the alarm, 
and there will be no more cranking. 
For several months Chief Chase and 
the firemen have been working on a 
combination truck. The gears of the 
old wagon were turned over to the 
street department, a powerful 90- 
horsepower engine was purchased at 
a nominal price and a combination 



chemical and hose apparatus was 
placed on the motor truck. All the 
work of this transformation has been 
done by Chief Chase and his men. 
The new apparatus will carry 1,400 
feet of 24-inch ho^e, 250 feet of chemi- 
cal hose and 70 gallons of chemicals. 
The machine is equipped with a 90- 
horsepower engine and the electric 
lights are fed by storage batteries. 
A portable searchlight will be attached 
which can be used on the truck or 
transferred into the building. The 
new truck is entirely of steel. The 
work on this new machine has been 
entirely done by Chief Chase and his 
men and has not cost the city a dollar. 
The truck is now in the hands of the 
painters and will soon be put into 
service. The horses which formerly 
drew this wagon have been trans- 
ferred to the street department, and 
the fire department has a credit of 
$5000 to their account. 



Glendale, San Jose and Bakersfield, 
Cal., have each bought up-to-date 
heavy motor chemical and hose wagon. 

Within a month's time San Jose and 
San Moderto, Cal., will each be equipp- 
ed with a very large double combina- 
tion auto chemical and hose waj>on. 

Glendale, Cal.. has ordered a combi- 
nation chemical and hose wagon into 
service. It will be equipped with elec- 
tric and oil lamps and the latest elec- 
tric starting de\ u e. 

Members of the St. Louis depart- 
ment have had their salaries increas- 
ed as follows: Five dollars a month 
for engineers, $10 for hose men, $10 for 

lieutenants and $15 for captains. 



Denver Wants Two-Platoon. 

With their main object the securing 
of the two-platoon system in their de- 
partment, Denver, Col., firemen have 
formed a mutual benefit association. 
Initiation fees have been fixed at $1, 
and dues for the present are only 25 
cents a month. Already 168 rat mbers 
have been secured. A charter amend- 
ment will be submitted at the next 
election installing the platoon system 
in the Denver Fire Department. 

The newly organized association will 
also ask that they be represented on 
the board having charge of the fire- 
men's pension fund. 

Officers elected were as follows: 
President, John Hill, assistant engi- 
neer of engine 1; Vice-President, 
Captain Emil Normile, engine 2; Sec- 
retary, W. E. Gaffner, engine 15. 

Test of a New Fire Escape. 

The Underwriters' Report says a 
steel tape fire escape patent was giv« n 
a demonstration anr' test in Oakland 
during the past week, when the in- 
ventors, Peter Vescovi and Edmund 
Gobati, made a descent of fourteen 
stories from one of the windows of 
Oakland's new city hall. It is a por- 
table fire escape device, consisting of 
a steel ribbon wound upon a cylil dt r 
and controlled by a firi II hand levi r. 
One end of the ribb< n is hook< d to the 
window frame, while the cylinder 
contained in the metal box is attached 
to a leather strap in which the parly 

seats himself. One can control the 
speed of the descent and distal. (e of 
the drop. It is claitrtd that the de- 
vice will he valuable in the saving of 
h\ es during large tires. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Generosity. 

When a fireman is killed on duty a 
local newspaper usually starts a fund 
for the benefit of his survivors and 
prints in large letters the names of all 
those who contribute, and at the same 
time publishes flattering remarks on 
the open-handed generosity of the 
citizens whenever they are called upon 
to contribute to a worthy cause. 

This is all very well if it works out 
very well, though in. many cases we 
should infinitely prefer to see every 
fireman protected by an adequate 
pension and never need to pass the hat 
around at all. 

But in many, if not most cases, the 
result in cash to the survivors is piti- 
fully small. In a southern city a few 
weeks ago, for instance, a member of 
the fire department gave his life in 
the discharge of his duty. Surviving 
him are a widow and two small chil- 
dren. The funds collected thus far 
totals the superb sum of five hundred 
dollars— and the newspaper which did 
the collecting calls upon heaven and 
earth to observe and admire the eager 
benevolence and reckless generosity 
of the citizens. — Fireman's Herald. 



San Diego. 

The coming of the motor apparatus 
will cause the departure of the fire 
horse in San Diego. Plans of the de- 
partment shortly to be put into execu- 
tion call for the elimination of all 
horse-drawn apparatus except at one 
outlaying station where horses will be 
kept on duty for awhile yet. 

The equipment, part of which has 
already arrived and the balance of 
which is expected daily, consists of 
five Gorhatn pumping engines and six 
Seagrave combination chemical and 
hose wagons, the total cost of which 
aggregates $65,000. 

Chief Almgren and the boys of the 
fire department are sorry to see the 
faithful old horses go, and if when 
offered for sale it is found that they 
casnot be placed in kind hands, a re- 
commendation will be made to the 
council that they be pensioned and 
turned loose to graze on the city pueblo 
lands. 

Trouble is brewing in the Colusa 
(C-il. ) Fire Department over the re- 
cent action of the trustees in reducing 



the monthly compensation of the de- 
partment. Formerly $56 was appro- 
priated monthly, to be paid in sums 
of $2 each for attendance at fires. 
The surplus went into the department 
fund. A recent order leaves the com- 
pensation at $2 per firemen each fire, 
but the volunteers are no longer al- 
lowed a balance up to $56. The new 
order has caused grumbling among 
the firemen and talk of disbanding is 
freely heard. 

To Abolish Fire Badges. 

Work on an ordinance to repeal the 
present one regulating the use of fire ' 
badges has been begun by a sub- 
committee of the Chicago Council 
Judiciary Committee. It is proposed 
to substitute a card bearing the name 
and photograph of the reporter to 
whom it is given, for the present 
enameled badge. 

Each card will be enclosed in a 
waterproof isinglass case. At fires 
the case will be worn in the hat band. 
Only the city editors on daily papers 
will be authorized to issue the cards. 
They will be of different colors, the 
fire chief naming the shades. They 
will be changed in color every three 
months. 

Massachusetts Two-Platoon. 

The bill presented to the state legis- 
lature providing for the establishment 
of the two-platoon systems in the fire 
departs of the larger ciiies in Massa- 
chusetts is dead, so far as the present 
legislature is concerned. The house 
recently by a rising vote refused to 
substitute the bill for the report of 
the committee on cities, which had 
recommended against the passage of 
the measure. The bill may be pre- 
sented at another session. 



Fireman J. J. Gillespie died a hero's 
death in the collapse of two stores at 
Nos. 140 and 142 Whitehall street, 
Atlanta, Ga., last week. He had res- 
cued six women from a part of the 
structure. 



STA'EMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP MANAGE- 
MENT. ETC.. of The Pac lie Finn. an published weekly 
at an l-rancisco. Cal.. required by the Alt of August 24, 
1912: Editor unci Managing Editor. J.. ni. B K Mack San 
Francisco. Cal.; business Manager. Kr.iud G. Preston 
San Francisco. Cal,; Publisher James K. Mack. San 
Francisco. Cal.: Owner. James K Mack. San FranciftCO, 
Cal. No known bondholders. mirtgag.es. and other se- 
curity holders. In -Mo u 1 j.er cent or more of tola! amount 
of bonds, mortgages, or nther securiti. s 

Ja*us K. M.w K. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me ihis 2 th da) of 
March. 19'3. (Seal.) Francis Km 1 I 

United States Commissioner North'n Dist. oi California. 



Again the Pole Hole. 

Alexander J. Grant, aged CO, a mem- 
ber of the Cloquet, Minn., Fire De- 
partment, died on March 3 from inju- 
ries sustained when he fell down the 
pole hole at the fire station. He re- 
turned to headquarters after helping 
fight the fire in the Wilander store 
block and was feeling ill frem lie ex- 
posure and bard work. In some man- 
ner he walked to the hole through 
which the pole descends to the floor 
below and fell down the hole, strikii g 
the floor and sustaining intt 11 ul irju- 
ries. He was taken to the hospital 
but never rallied. 

Tax Exemptions for Idaho Firemen. 

A bill has been introduced in the 
Idaho legislature which is stturirg 
the backing of the members of volun- 
teer fire deparfme nts over the entire 
state. The bill provides for the i x- 
emption of the firemen in regular 
volunteer departments frrm the i<ad 
poll tax. The firemen in Wardner 
and Kellogg agitated the question 1 e- 
fore the legislature convened and 
brought the matter to the attention 
of their county representatives. 

Under the present system the tax 
is refunded to the fire rren by the cities 
and villages in many instances, but a 
great deal of red tape is unraveled in 
the process. 

A late N. Y. fire publication says: 
Upon the recommendation of Fire 
Chief Murphy of San Francisco, Cal., 
the Fire Commission has ordered all 
of the city fire engines equipped with 
a special gas burner, whit h will main- 
tain a constant ste:. m pressun en tie 
engine at a saving of from so to 50 
!per cent in fuel. 

Only men less than thirty years of 
u ill he eligible to the fire departn i it 
of Minneapolis. Mil n., since the ad< l - 
tion of a recommendation by lire 
Chief Charles W. Ringer, by the 
Council Committee on File. The age 
limits are to be charged fr< m 21 to £5 
years to 21 to 30 years. 

Butte, Mont., has now a "flying 
squadron" auto wagon and an auto 
combination chemical and hose vagi n. 
Their speed capacity is 55 miles an 
hour, but in the business seel. in it 
is kept down to 40 miles, pnd Is he tie 
steepest hills \\ it h \ eil< et t in . 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

"The Milion, " a farce comedy 
adapted from the French by Leo 
Ditrichstein and successfully produced 
on Broadway last season by Henry W. 
Savage, will be given its first presen- 
tation west of Chicago next Monday 
evening in the Alcazar, with Charles 
Waldron and Madeleine Louis leading 
a cast comprising the complete stock 
company and several specially-engag- 
ed players. In the adaptation of this 
merry offering the scenes have been 
shifted from Paris to New York and 
the characters Americanized. There 
are four acts, and with the rise of the 
first curtain begins a carnival of fun 
that continues at high pitch until the 
final climax. Mr. Waldron, whose 
ability as a comedian is well known 
to the Alcazar's patrons, will be seen 
as the medical student, and Miss 
Louis promises to be effective as the 
music teacher. John A. Butler is 
cast for the role of reporter, which he 
created and played throughout last sea- 
son in the Savage production. Others 
in the comedy are Carlo Bravo, spe- 
cially engaged to play the Italian 
opera singer; Louis Bennison, as a 
typical metropolitan policeman, Burt 
Wesner as an East Sider, Thos. Chat- 
terton as the sculptor, Roy Clements 
as the burglar, Clara Beyers as the 
artists' model and Rhea Mitchell as the 
keeper of the road house, and a dozen 
other people appropriately bestowed. 

Empress Theatre. 

An announcement that will undoubt- 
edly evoke favorable comment is that 
of the appearance at the Bmpress 
Theatre next Sunday afternoon of Mr. 
Nat Carr, the perennially popular 
Hebrew character comedian and late 
star of "Wine, Women and Song, "in 
a one-act comedy- drama entitled 
"The End of the World," from the 
pen of the noted and prolific writer, 
Aaron Hoffman. A big circus specta- 
cle, Albers Polar Bears, will also be a 
feature. These snow white monarchs 
from the frozen North are beauties. 
Anot her act that bids fair to contest 
popularity with both the former acts 
will be the four Philippinos, a quartet 
of little brown men who have mas- 
tered the art of stringed instrument 
playing. Hilda Glyder, "The Firefly 



When You're BuyirT Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Sole Distributor for the Pacific Coast 543 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 





A m e r i c an_ J^jLibber^/VVf^J^ o. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories- Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 

Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



Brass 



of Vaudeville," is a dainty, captivat- 
ing;, piquant and roguish little crea- 
ture, who will lilt a few syncopated 
melodies for tbe delight of Empress 
patrons. About the only thing that 
Wallace Galvin can't manipulate is his 
salary — and by the same token he has 
boosted that because of his dexterity 
with his hands. Bob Knapp and Chris 
Cornalla, two grotesque jesters and 
acrobats, have an offering entitled 
"Noiseless Talk." Martini and Moore 
and Twilight Pictures complete the bill. 



H»r pt»M S 2^17 

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L. RI/NIC Proprietor 

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iM'i RH EAR I SPIS) 'IALTY 
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PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2.00 

Sis i th_H I 00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 
Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 
continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908, at the 
Postomce at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of ( 'mi- 
lti esH of March X IS79. 

A double -eighty straight American-La 
France chemical engine was tested as to 
speed, hill-climbing, etc., over in Oakland 
Tuesday. It achieved a speed up the steepest 
hills at the rate of 30 to 35 miles, while on 
level ground the speedometer showed 60 miles 
an hour. 

At the request of counsel forCommissioners 
Brady and Rosenthal of the Civil Service 
Board, the hearing of the suit of Battalion 
Chief John R. Maxwell, to restrain the Board 
from holding an examination, was continued 
Monday until April 3. The continuance was 
made by Judge Murasky, before whom the 
case was set. 

It seems to be the consensus of opinion 
among the members of the Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Downtown Association of 
Merchants that if Chief Engineer Murphy is 
to be held responsible for the destruction of 
life and property by tire, they argue the 
Charter should be amended by a vote of the 
people, giving him the right to choose his 
assistant engineers, in whom he has implicit 
confidence, independent of the Civil Service 
Commission. 

At Monday night's meeting of the Civil 
Service Commission steps were taken to de- 
fend its action against the suits brought 
against it by Battalion Chief John R. Max- 
well and Lieut. Allen Matlock of the tire de- 
partment. On motion of Commissioner Brady, 
seconded by Rosenthal, it was decided to se- 
cure counsel. President Walcott voted against 
the motion holding that the commission lacked 
the funds for defense. The matter of finances 
was deferred until the next meeting. 

While a bid was under consideration by the 
Berkeley Council recently for a second-size 
steam fire engine, to cost $10.0U0, the Gorham 
people, on invitation of Fire Chief Kenney 
and members of the Council, were requested 
to give a demonstration of their turbine fire 
pumping engine to which they promptly com- 
plied. The demonstration so pleased the chief 
and the members of the Council and others 
who witnessed it, that the chances of award- 
ing the contract for the steam fire engine will 
be reconsidered, and from present indica- 
tions it looks as if Berkeley will soon have a 
Gorham turbine fire pumping engine. 



A Rap at Civil Service. 

Fire and Water Engineering never misses 
an opportunity to take a rap at Civil Service, 
if only given a possible plausible excuse. In 
its issue of March 12, in an editorial, it is 
more caustic than usual. In one paragraph 
it says: "Civil Service is a good thing when 
it is properly used, but it is the most vicious 
and atrocious weapon that was ever placed in 
the hands of men who aim to control public 
positions." 

Civil Service is practically a new innova- 
tion in fire departments, and commissioners 
are liable to err from lack of experience, and 
if Fire and Water Engineering, which pur- 
ports to represent firemen, was sincere, it 
would aid instead of putting obstacles in its 
way. when given the least opportunity. From 
the reading of the article ii is evident that 
paper can see no good results to accrue to 
firemen from Civil Service methods. The 
words "when it is properly used" is wholly 
misapplied coming from that journal. We 
quote the editorial in full as follows: 

"It does seem ridiculous, nevertheless it is 
true, that, although a fireman may get one 
hundred per cent in physical bravery and 
ninety-nine per cent in fitness for his duties, 
his excellent record may be valuless if he 
says nine times t-even equals sixty-four, or 
spells "essential" with one "s." Erudition 
is not an indispensable requisite to a good 
fireman; physical bravery is. A man with 
the learning of a college professor and pos- 
sessing no courage would bean abject failure 
as a fireman, while a physically courageous 
man with a mediocre education might become 
an ideal one. Why, then, is it necessary for 
an applicant for a position in the city tire de- 
partment to be an all-round scholar? 

"In many cities, in order to win promotion, 
a fireman must pass a rigid physical test, an 
equally exacting rapid-fire oral examination, 
at the same time be a "practical" fireman, 
and a cool-headed one— all of which is per- 
fectly reasonable. But to oblige him to roll 
up a goodly percentage in spelling, grammar, 
arithmetic, penmanship and kindred studies, 
before he can obtain promotion, is the highest 
folly. 

"Civil Service is a good thing when it is 
properly used, but it is the most vicious and 
atrocious weapon that was ever placed in the 
hands of men who aim to control public posi- 
tions. There is scarcely a city that has not 
used it at some time to keep deserving men 
out of office and unworthy and incompetent 
men in office. Il is true that many fire de- 
partments enjoy a wholesome lack of tainted 
politics, but occasionally a bit of maneuvering 
slips past in the higher ranks that is off 
color, with the result that bitterness is en- 
gendered in the rank and file. 

"An instance may becited in a western city, 
which pays its firemen ninety dollars per 
month, and as a department they have no 
superiors. A saloonkeeper, politician and 
gambler ordered his nephew placed in one of 
the best office positions in the department 
and two hundred dollars a month. He was 
never a fireman, and spends much of his time 



in the chief's aut oinohih- wa I ching s| ol;i u- 

lar fires. Under such conditionx a fin 
partment that can he kept in efficient wi tl 
ing order is composed of men who are easy 

to please. " 



Who Was to Blame? 



A few weeks ago, in an Eastern city, two 
officers, one of whom was a deputy chief, 
were killed by inhaling the fumes of nitric 
acid. An alarm was sent in for a small fire 
caused by the overturning of a cal hoj of acid 
in the basement of a drug concern. Four 
other firemen were overcome at 'lie eumje 
fire and their recovery was doubtful for sev- 
eral days. 

The coroner, after a searching investiga- 
tion, reported that there was in. neglif 
on the part of the owners of the i Lore and 
that the accident was "unavoidable." Tin \ 
had warned the firemen of the pn <n. of 
the acid and that relieved them of all re- 
sponsibility. Two lives snufTed out and 
one was to blarne. 

The import anee of this tragedy rii 
in the culpability or innocence of ihe citizen, 
hut in the fact that the firemen i 
pear to have realized the danger the} ran 
when they permitted the fumes of nitric acid 
to enter their lungs. This condiih 
all peculiar to any certain city, but it is to he 
found in many fire departments throughout 
the country, where tire officers aid fin nun 
are not informed as to the risks involved in 
breathing the fumes of chemical? which city 
ordinances permit to he stoic ii ui ii. t *ery 
loose safeguards against breakage i r ex- 
plosion. 

A fireman cannot very well become v. < hi m- 
ist, too, but the general need is pail 
evident for elementary instructioi , at least, 
in what may happen when firemen are called 
upon to deal with the chemical.-, gases and 
volatile oils upon which so much of modern 
industry is based. 

Had this unfortunate chief been possessed 
of even a slight know leil^e of the dan&er of 
inhaling acid fumes this tragedy might have 
been averted. 



Incidental to the cyclone and fire at Omaha, 
it is reported that fire alarms came in so ra- 
pidly that the department was unable to ren- 
der any aid and many dwellings burned io the 
ground. The men worked without food and 
sleep and fell exhaust* d and had to be re- 
moved to hospitals. A Dayton dispatch tavs 
that Fire Chief Frank Ramby declared that 
many firemen were drowned early Thursday 
in trying to reach the flames. They were 
working in boats, many of which were upset. 
Some of the firemen grappled with horses 
swimming near by and drowned when the 
animals sank. The men of this department 
should at once raise a fund to relieve their 
comrades in their distress, especially I he 
families of the men who lost their lives in 
endeavoring to rescue others from the flames. 

For Flowers for all occasions call up Missicn 
5988. J. J. O'Connor, 2750 Mission Street. 



Subscribe for the Pacific Fireman. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

The FireCommission met Friday, March 28, 
and approved the Administrative Report, 
from which we take the following: 

From Jas. L. Vizzard, tendering his resig- 
nation as a member of the department as 
truckman truck 7, to take effect from March 
13. Accepted. 

From Battalion Chief Britt, submitting a 
report of an injury to his hand, sustained by 
W. Cooper, hoseman engine 17, while report- 
ing for duty after his day off March 8. Filed. 

From Wm. Mullen, engineer engine 37, re- 
questing that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for thirtv days, without pay, on ac- 
count of sickness in his family, commencing 
from March 17. Granted. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the position of H. Murphy be changed 
from hoseman to driver of engine 12, to take 
effect from date. So ordered. 

From the chief engineer, reporting having 
detailed Jesse Loh, hoseman engine 17, as 
operator to first assistant chief engineer, to 
take effect from the 16th inst. Approved. 

From the chief engineer, reporting having 
made the following temporary assignments 
of probationary engineers appointed at the 
last meeting: G. T. Anderson to engine 17; 
H. B. Butterworth to engine 12; A. F. Bart- 
mann to engine 34; W. J. Brady to engine 35; 
R. H. Lockyer to engine 16; Bernard Munter 
to engine 15; W. J. Hannan to engine 1; W. 
J. Beale to engine 9; Wm. Dieterich to en- 
gine 4; F. T. Keenrn to engine 6; F. G. Ernst 
to engine 42; P. J. Horgan to engine 19. 
Approved. 

From the chief engineer, reconmending 
that the following applications for transfers 
be granted, to take effect from the 16th inst.: 
Bert Schaefer, from ho-ieman engine 4 to 
driver monitor battery 3; M. Dwyer, from 
hoseman engine. 19 to hoseman engine 21; R. 
Pritchard, from hoseman engine 44 to hose- 
man engine 111; J. Miller, from hoseman en- 
gine 34 to hoseman engine 17; Edward Mur- 
ray, from hoseman engine 42 to hoseman fire- 
boat 2; W. J. Strickler, from hoseman engine 
9 to hoseman fireboat 2; Thos. Howe, from 
Operator to driver engine 7; A. W. Quinn, 
from hoseman engine 1 to truckman truck 7. 
Approved. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
thai the position of Edw. O'Neil be changed 
from hoseman to stoker of engine 30. Ap- 
p roved. 

From the chief engineer, r nmending! 

that the application of (i. A. Reeil for a I rans- 
fer from stoker engine SS to hoseman engine 
29 In' granted. So ordered. 

From the chief engineer, relative to the 
inability of .1. McCarthy, hoseman engine 29, 
to perform his required duties at the drill 
tower on the 10th instant. After an investi- 
gation of this matter your committee lind 

that there were in. facta to substantiate the 

statement, thai McCarthy might have I n 

omier the influence of intoxicating liquor at 
that time, he claiming thai he was sick, and 
accordingly recommend that the complaint be 

dismissed. 



From Alexander George, driver relief en- 
gine 2, tendering his resignation as a member 
of the department. Referred back to Admin- 
istrative Committee. 

From the Civil Service Commission, certify- 
ing the name of A. N. Marr for appointment 
as steneographer-typewriter. Appointed. 

From Robert H. Lockyer, tendering his re- 
signation as engineer of engine 16, to take 
effect from the 16th inst. Accepted. 

From the Committee for the Investigation 
of Acts of Valor, submitting a report in the 
matter of the meritorious act of F. J. Hughes, 
hoseman engine 41, and recommending that a 
record of the same be inscribed in the Book 
of Meritorious Conduct. So ordered. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the application of J. H. Miller for a 
transfer from hoseman engine 17 to hoseman 
engine 12 be granted, to take effect April 1. 
Approved. 

From Thos. R. Murphy, chief engineer, re- 
questing that he be allowed salary during 
disability, resulting from an injury to his 
back while in the performance of his duty at 
a fire on March 5. Allowed. 

Calendar of matters presented to the Board 
of Fire Commissioners March 28, 1913: 

Consideration of complaint against Howard 
Holmes, lieutenant engine 4, for being under 
the influence of intoxicating liquor while on 
duty Feb. 11. Snspended for fourteen days, 
from Feb. 14th to 28th. 

Trial of Henry J. Welch, hoseman engine 
26, for reporting for duty while under the in- 
fluence of intoxicating liquor on March 18. 
Put over. 

Civil Service certifications of Samuel Hat- 
field as engineer of fire engines, vice Robert 
H. Lockyer, resigned. Appointed. 

From the Civil Service Commission, certi- 
fying as hosemen, Charles A. Gray, Wm. A. 
Petry, Patrick Golden, Vincent E. Wilson, 
Geo. A. Healy, Edward J. Dougherty and 
Geo. G. Derham All appointed 

From the Civil Service Commission, oerti- 
fjing Jas. J. Woods for appointment as truck- 
man. Put over until he appear. 

Civil Service certification of George A. 
Stewart as machinist. Appointed. 

Resolution restoring the following tempo- 
rary eiiginneers to their regular rank and 
position as hosemen in the department, sub- 
ject to assignment by the chief engineer: 
Ben. A Derham, John Hannan, George W. 
Hall, Wm. Moore. Edw, .1. M..ran. Wm. 1. 
Crosby, Jas. C. Herlihy, Eugene Mulligan 
and Jas F. Ward. Approved 

Resolution requesting the Civil Service 
Commissipn to authorize the payment of de- 
mands of temporary engineers foi 16 days m 
March. Approved. 

The American La France Fire Engil - I 
pany of California expect, to make delivery to 
this department three combination chemicals 
and two straight chemical engines along about 
the 24lh of April. The apparatus is to be 
Btarted on its westward journey from K mira, 
New York, April I, 

Subscribe for the Pacific Fireman. 



lack Goldstone. 



Do you know Jack Goldstone, more fami- 
liarly known along in the 80's as "Jake" 
among the old vets who are still doing fire 
duty in the department? Goldstone was a 
member of engine company 15 and it is said 
that he was the most courageous, dare-devil 
member in the department. It was common 
talk among the boys that Jake was neither 
afraid of God, man or the devil, and was ever 
ready to take the lead in anything requiring 
courage and deviltry. He had a hand in 
every game that called for grit and deter- 
mination. 

The roster of the company at the time of 
which we-write was as follows: D. A Smith, 
foreman; Thos. Walsh, assistant foreman; 
Hugh Reilly, driver; Pat Flynn, stoker and 
Thos. Bulger, engineer. Hosemen— James 
Layden, F. J. Moran, Wm. Barry, Jack Gold- 
stone, Sam Hertz, Jack Finnegan and Tim 
O'Brien. Goldstone joined the department 
in 1885 and served about a year and a half, 
when he went, into the poultry business. 

It was considered a feat in those days, and 
is even so yet, to drive a steamer down the 
California street steep hill, and driver Malo- 
ney (now dead) of engine 3, one of the best 
drivers who ever drew a rein over a fire horse, 
says Tim O'Brien, was the one man in the de- 
partment who accomplished it, and we under- 
stand Goldstone was the only man that had 
the nerve to ride on the apparatus in its 
perilous descent. 

A Tour of Inspection. 

Last Tuesday, under the supervision of Fire 
Chief Murphy and President Hammer of the 

\ Fire Commission, a tour of inspection of San 
Francisco's fire protection facilil ies w as taken 

I by a committee of the Downtown Association. 
The high pressure [tumping station, fin heals, 
corporation yard and new lire houses w en- 
visited. A drill was staged at the drill tower. 
Seventeenth and Harrison streets, and the 
fire fighters were sent through their paces. 
The members of the association made the in- 
spection for the purpose of thoroughly inform- 
ing themselves regarding the fire protection 
system, in order that they may deal intelli- 
gently with all future questions which may 
arise concerning the department. 

If Fin- and Water Engineering is so ■ 
li, his h.r the welfare ..f Civ n Service as it 
| would have us fain to believe, win is it that 
ii goes on i ol its w ;i\ en . verj pob>ible 
sion to put obstacles in its path instead ol 
aiding it V That is what many of its rea.l. Is, 

who favor Civil Service would like to 

From 1'. M. Keiina. host I, r at tl 
meiii stabler, n questing that l.l. 
Iea\ •■ el ai, .in-.- i"i i - n daj s, wiih i . i n ii 
sion to leave the citj . on ... i ounl of 
Granted, 



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MOTOR FIR 



APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 



llustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



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Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening. Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission. 2-lth street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Phoi 



i D.ujU. 4934 
'( Home C 2842 



PholM 



I Wen . 586 
I Home S 3174 



Serveau Bros. 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



WM. F. EIGAN 

M. R. C. V. SL 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D. 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco, Cal 



THE beat attention and service for the man who car- 
ries a HOWARD Watch not on account of the 
watch, but because he is likely to be that kind 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does sug- 
pesl a man who appreciates quality and is quite able to 
know whether he is getting it or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell ynu a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a g-ood man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what ynu 
pay for it. 



FLORISTS 



128 POST ST. 



2110-2114 FILLMORE ST. 



112 S. Spring St. 717 K Street 

Los Angeles Sacramento 

EAGLESON & CO. 

Importer? and Manufacturer) 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 
Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1118 MARKET ST., opp. Seventh 



Phone Douel.i 4716 

LAMANETBROS 

HATS. UNDERWEAR, ETC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



The price of each wat.h is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attached— from the 
L7-jewel tdouble rolien in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gnld-filled case at $4'\ to the 23- 
jewel at $150— and the Edward Howard model 

Home C 2456 at J3F.0. 

Ailmiral Sipsbee has written a little h"i>k. 
"The Lop of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record <<( his own Howard in the U. ^- Navy 
You'H enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Depl X 
and we'll send you a copy. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston, Mass 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 



PhoDcM.rkl5417 



630 KEARNY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO COR COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLF-R ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

We Do Artistic 

Job Printing 




VOL. X.-NO. 20 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



N. Y. Firemen Receive 

Medals for Bravery. 

The greatest day in the history of 
the New York City Fire Department, 
long to be remembered by those who 
took part in it, was Thursday, March 
20, when twenty-nine firemen receiv- 
ed medals for bravery and the offi- 
cially putting in commission ten new 
engine companies by Mayor Gaynor, 
all motor-propelled. The N. Y. Press 
of March 21, speaking of the memora- 
ble affair, had the following to say 
of it: 

With a dexterous turn of a knob 
on a specially constructed firebox on 
the plaza in front of the City Hall, 
Maynor Gaynor yesterday afternoon 
sent in his first "false alarm," there- 
by officially placing in the service of 
the city ten new engine companies 
and nine new fi rehouses equipped with 
motor apparatus. 

In response to the alarm the ten 
•companies, six of which are in Brook- 
lyn, two in Manhattan and two in The 
Bronx, each rolled to a point in its dis- 
trict and thereby proved they are 
ready for service. Three pieces of 
the motor apparatus, stationed down- 
town, rushed through a crowd of 
5.000 persons gathered in the plaza 
and snorted their greetings to the 
Mayor in less than one minute after 
he had turned in the alarm. 

Then to complete what Joseph 
Johnson, Fire Commissioner, was 
pleased to call the greatest day in the 
history of the I'cparlnienl. the Mayor, 
with Johnson and several city officials, 
entered the reception room in the City 



Hall, where the Mayor distributed 
medals to twenty-nine firemen for 
brave deeds in the last year. 

The celebration began at 10 o'clock 
in the morning when Johnson, head- 
ing a procession of seven red automo- 
biles, in which were his deputies, Geo. 
W. Olvaney and Philip P. Farley; 
Chief Kenlon, E. R. Conaway, Fire 
Commissioner of Denver, and others, 
made the rounds of the six new fire- 
houses in Brooklyn. It did not end 
until 5 o'clock in the afternoon, when 
the last of the new firehouses was 
officially opened by Commissioner 
Johnson in The Bronx. The exercises 
in the City Hall were sandwiched in 
between the tours of the firehouses in 
Brooklyn and Manhattan. 

AUTOMOBILES COLLIDE. 

Boards of trade and chambers of 
commerce in all of the districts fav- 
ored with new apparatus turned out 
to look at the fine new garage fire- 
houses and hear what Commissioner 
Johnson had to say. He preached his 
hobby, fire prevention, to them and 
begged them to do all that was possi- 
ble to relieve firemen of danger to life 
and limb, mainly by keeping down 
the number of tires by scientific pre- 
ventive measures. 

One accident marred the day. 
Johnson and his guest, E. R. Cona- 
way, were speeding down Bedfi rd 
avenue, Brooklyn, on the way to Man- 
hattan, in the big department touring 
car. At VVilloughby avenue the car 
crashed into another automobile, 
twisting it arc.und a telegrape pole, 
and hurling its occupants to the street. 

Frank Kronker of 103 Rogers ave- 
nue and Prank Dowler of L'LT Lincoln 



place were dangerously injured. They 
were taken to Cumberland Street 
Hospital in the car occupied by Bat- 
talion Chief Graham, who was fol- 
lowing. 

An exhibition of the modem mo- 
tor apparatus being installed in the 
new firehouses began in the City Hall 
shortly before noon. In spile of "the 
rain,. the apparatus attracted several 
thousands. 

Mayor Gaynor promptly at 2:30 
turned in the alarm which sent tie 
ten new companies on their fiisl call. 
Forty seconds afterward an autcmc- 
bile pumping engine, stationed t< m- 
porarily in the quarters of truck 10, 
Fulton and Church streets, dashed 
through the expectant crowd in re- 
sponse to the signal. Ahead of it 
came a little red car bearing Deputy 
Chief John Binns, in charge of the 
district. Last came an automobile 
truck a third of a block long. 

MEDALS AWARDED. 

After inspecting the apparatus, 
the Mayor returned to the City Hall, 
where the medals were given to the 
honor men. 

The medals were awarded as fel- 
lows: 

James Gordon Bennett and De- 
partment Medals— Seneca Larke, Jr.. 
engine company 20, for heroism in 
sawing the liars of the Guarantee 
Safe Deposit Company's vaults during 
the lire in the Equitable building 
while protected from flames two feet 
away by a spraj of water and while 
red-hot debris was falling about him, 
saving I wo lives. 

Hugh Bonner ami I h pat I ment 
Medals Fin man Jan i s ( '• . Brown of 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



hook and ladder truck 40, for the res- 
cue of the late Captain Bass at the 
time when Brown, Bass and the late 
Battalion Chief Walsh were caught in 
the collapse of walls in the Equitable 
building fire. 

Trevor Warren and Department 
Medals— Fireman James A. Molloy of 
engine company 32, for risking his 
life to try to rescue three men on the 
roof of the Equitable buiiding. 

Wortheim and Department Me- 
dals—Fireman John F. Mooney of 
hook and ladder company 4, for the 
rescue of three women from the third 
floor front window at 252 West Forty- 
seventh street, January 13, 1912. 

Strong and Department Medals- 
Fireman Thomas Kilbride, for assist- 
ing in the rescue of four persons in the 
fire over Dennett's restaurant on Oc- 
tober 6, 1912. 

Brooklyn Citizen Medal — Captain 
J. J. Walsh of engine company 269, 
for -rescuing Mr. and Mrs. E. D. 
Packard from the third and fourth 
floors of 138 Fifth avenue, Brooklyn, 
on February 18, 1912. 

Hurley Medal — Fireman Charles 
Holmholtz of engine company 238, for 
rescuing Mrs. Fannie Simon from a 
fire in the rear of 479 Metropolitan 
avenue, Brooklyn, on April 24, 1912. 

Agnew Medal — Fireman Arthur 
L. X. Boylan of engine company 14, 
for saving Anna and Mercedes Devine | 
from the third floor front window of 
121 West Sixteenth street, Manhattan, 
on March 6. 

Crimmins and Department Medal 
— Lieutenant Chas. W. Rankin, chau- 
ffeur to Chief Kenlon, for bravery at 
the Equitable building fire. 

Stephenson Medal — Captain John 
J. Kelly of hook and ladder truck 9, 
for high efficiency of his eompany in 
quarters at drill and at fires. 

D'partmsnt Medal — Fireman F. 
X. Shields, for rescuing Jos. Gannon 
from the ledge of a fourth-story win- 
dow of 163 West Thirty-fourth street, 
October 7, 1912. 

Department Medal — Fireman Fred- 
erick J. Deissroth of engine com- 
pany 7, for assisfing in the rescues in 
the Dennett restaurant fire. 

"After the medals had been pinned 
on the men by Fire Chief Kenlon, the 
Mayor praised the work of ihe depart- 



ment and complimented the honor 
men. 

Commissioner Johnson announced 
that twenty -eight motor -propelled 
steam engines have been ordered at a 
price of $8,000 each. Ten of the eleven 
were placed in service yesterday. 
There are to be twenty-eight of the 
combination hose carts at $4163 each. 
These carts can make thirty-five miles 
an hour, and each one carries 2,000 
feet of hose. They carry also 70 gal- 
lons of chemical fluid. 

No Raise for Chief. 



Fifteen Firemen Overcome. 

At Philadelphia, March 20, fifteen 
firemen were overcome by fumes of 
chloroform and were taken to hospi- 
tals, a score of girls were injured 
when they jumped from windows, 
and drugs and chemicals valued at 
$100,000 were destroyed when the 
plant of the Munyon Remedy, Fifty- 
fourth and Jefferson streets burned. 
Henry Bixler, an employe: discovered 
the fire. By the time engines arrived, 
a half hour had elapsed and the flames 
had made great headway. When the 
girls were notified to leave the build- 
ing many of them jumped to the tracks 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad siding 
alongside the plant. 

Set Fires Just For Fun. 

At Winnipeg (Man.) March 29, be- 
cause he loved to hear the clanging of 
fire engine bells and the excitement 
fire alarm and police wires under- 1 of attending fires, James Dodds, aged 
ground, be carried in the public im-| twenty-three, a farm laborer, staited 
provement account, while the cost of more than one hundred fires in Winni- 



In his recent letterto the Butte City 
Council, Mayor Duncan recommends 
that the suggested increase in the 
salary of the fire chief be not heeded, 
saying however modest this rate of 
increase may be, the city cannot afford 
it. He urges that the sum of $2,300, 
estimated as necessary for placing the 



maintenance should be carried as an 
expense of the department. The 
mayor urges that action with refer- 
ence to purchase of an automobile 
pumping engine be deferred, in view 
of the pressing needs of other depart- 
ments and the city's financial condi- 
tion. He believes that with such new 
equipment as has already been pur- 
chased, the department can get along 
nicely for another year.— Underwrit- 
ers' Report. 

Old "Fire Laddies" Feast. 

The Veteran Firemen's Association 
held its sixty-fourth annual banquet 
on Friday night, March 28. Ninety- 
six veterans were present and the 
guest of the evening was Sam Davis 
of Carson City. Old songs were sung 
and stories of the old days told. The 
committee in charge consisted of Steve 
Bunner, J. B. Butterworth, Charles 
Riles and Mark A. Devine. 

Battalion Chief Morgan andOperator 
Shillett of the Oakland Fire Depart- 
ment were severely injured in an au- 
tomobile accident at Fifteenth avenue 
and East Fourteenth street during the 
past week, the former receiving a 
fracture of the skull and a broken 
jaw. Shillett had both feet broken 
and sustained other injuries. 



peg and St. Boniface in less than a 
year, according to a confession the 
police declared he had made to them. 
Dodds, who was arrestad while setting 
fire to a large barn, admitted that he 
was responsible for the Radford- 
Wright fire several months ago, in 
; which seven lives were lost, the police 
allege. Officials say his operations 
have caused loss aggregating more 
than $1,000,000. 

The Ontario, Cal., City Council has 
accepted the bid of the Gamewell 
Electric Signal Company for the in- 
stallation of a fire alarm system for 
that city. 

A fire in the Union Hotel, San 
Mateo, Thursday night, March 27, 
thought to be the work of an incen- 
diary, resulted in a loss of $250. 

W. West, a negro who lives on the 
Mission road, was burned to death last 
Sunday night in a small house in the 
rear of a building being wrecked at 
Post street and Van Ness avenue. 

STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP MANAGE- 
MENT. ETC.. of The Fn- fie Firtman. publi>l.. viekly 
at San Francisco. Cal.. required by the Act of August T4. 
1912: Editor and Managing Editor. Jfmes K. Mack. San 
Frarcisco. Cal.: I usir.os Manager. Karo'd G. Preston. 
San Frarcisco. Cal.: Publisher James K. Mack. Ssn 
Francisco. Cal.: Owner. James K. ]i"t.ck. San Frarcisco. 
Cal. No known bondholders, mortgagees, ard other se- 
curity ho'ders. holding 1 per cent or more of tola) amount 
of bonds, mortgages, or other securiti- p. 

jAMts K. Mack. 

Sworn to and subscribed lefore me this 2tth dav of 
Match. 1913. (Seal.i Francis Kboix, 

United States Commissioner North'n Dist. of California. 



PACIFIC KIKEMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 



"The Man on the Case," a detective 
story with charming romance and keen 
wit, will he given its first presentation 
in the West next Monday evening and 
throughout the week in the Alcazar. 
It was written by Grace Livingston 
Furniss and scored a Broadway hit 
last season, every scene and character 
in it being pronounced unusual and 
cleverly drawn. Charles Waldron and 
Madeleine Louis will lead a carefully- 
placed cast. Mr. Waldron will be seen 
as Dempsey, Miss Louis as Nell, E. L. 
Bennison as the detective and Bert 
Wesner and Clara Beyers as Mr. and 
Mrs. Longacre, with the remainder 
of the stock company appropriately 
bestowed. Elaborate staging is prom- 
ised. When the story opens some old 
■jewels have disappeared from the 
home of the exclusive and aristocratic 
Longacre family, at East Hampton, 
Long Island, and a famous detective, 
is employed to find them. It develops 
that Longacre, in sore need of money, 
pawned the valuables, and when his 
wife suspects and accuses him he con- 
fesses, but allows the detective to 
continue on the case. The Longacres 
have been compelled to raise money 
to entertain a young millionaire, Car- 
roll Dempsey, to whom they hope to 
wed their daughter Nell. Dempsey is 
expected to arrive any minute and 
Nell declares that she will not be sold 
as so much merchandise. Then the 
detective telephones that he is at the 
station and will pretend to have an 
accident in front of the house so he 
may be taken in by necessity and be 
able to conceal his identity while at 
work. 

Empress Theatre. 

"The Rose of Mexico, " a wordless 
play from the pen of G. Molasso, who 
gave us "Paris by Night," "La Somn- 
ambule" and other stellar attractions 
during the past two years will be the 
headline attraction at the Empress 
Theatre Sunday-afternoon. ' 'A Christ- 
mas on theComstock," a little playlet 
written by Harry Cottrell, is the spe- 
cial feature. It is presented by Mona 
Glendower and Raymond Manion, 
both noted legitimate players. Welch, 
Mealy and Montrose, with the origi- 
nal "Scream." Wei 'eh a corpulent, 



When You're Buyin 9 Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to jfe< 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 





good oil, say 



PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 



Sole P'stributor for the Pacific Const 



543 fiolden Oate Ave., San Francisco 



A me rican Rubber Mfg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street. Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Bra* 
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eccentric comedian, created a verita- 
ble riot in New York with their ludri- 
couslv funny travesty called "Play 

Ball." Jennie Fletcher, known as JRIPP REMEDY COMPANY 
"The Scotch Nightingale," will be, 
beard in a repertoire of classic and 

semi-classical ballads. Dow & Dow positively curbs 

are Hebrew character comedians. The 

Skaters Bi Jouve were imported from Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh. Rheumatism, 
the Palace Theatre, London, for a 
tour of the S. & C. circuit. George 
MacKenzie, a shadowgraphist and 
Marie Fay and Glendolyn Claire, sing- 
ers and dancers, make up the pro- 
gramme. 



Goitre. Tumorous Growths. Malaria, 



Erysipelas. Scrofula, Lupus, 



Home phont S 2'i 1 7 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

I \l'l RH /.!/.• A SPECIALTY 
2»oo-«8 (HARY STREI I 

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Tuberhular-Glands. 
Joints and all Blood Diseases 

SAN FRANCISCO 



V A C 1 V 1 C FIREMAN 



P 



hem 




IREMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance 

Six months 



$2 00 
1.00 



ADVERTISEMENTS 

I nsei ted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 

continuous ones. 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postomce at San Francisco. Cat. under the Act of Con- 
dress of March 3. 1879. 



The commissary department at the corpo- 
ration yard last week finished testing 5000 
feet of 3| inch fire hose from the American 
Rubber Works at Emeryville. Every length 
bears Sam Bermingham's 0. K. on it, and 
that in itself is a guarantee. 



chief, the brains of that department. How- 
ever, the book is well worth reading and we 
recommend if. to our readers. It can be se- 
cured from the public library or by sending 
direct to Dodd, Mead & Co., New York city. 
We are not irfor ned as to its price. 

An evening paper last Thursday. March 27, 
stated that a battalion chief and two captains 
of the fire department called upon Mayor 
Rolph and assured him of the support of 98 
per cent of the members in carrying out his 
Civil Service policies. The committee told 
the Mayor that a large majority of the men 
of the department endorse the action of Com- 
missioners Brady and Rosenthal in eliminat- 
ing the physical tests from the examinations 
for promotion to assistant chiefs, and also in 
certifying one name from the eligible list for 
promotion, instead of three, as demanded by 
the Fire Commissioners. 



Owing to the absence of Judge Murasky, 
the hearing on the petition of Battalion Chief 
John R. Maxwell to restrain the Civil Service 
Board from holding an examination for first 
and second engineers in the fire department, 
was continued until Monday, Apxil 7, by 
Judge Van Nostrand Thursday. The tempo- 
rary restraining order remains in force. 

Dr. Egan, veterinary of the department, 
has been giving the Pasteuer treatment to 
one of the horses of engine company 33, who 
showed signs of rabbies from being bitten by 
a mad dog during the early part of the week. 
The horse is now improving and the doctor is 
confident that it will have fully recovered in 
a few days. He encountered considerable 
trouble in securing the treatment, as none of 
the veterinarians had it on hand, but finally 
secured it from the State Board of Pharmacy. 

From Captain George Brown, secretary of 
the Firemen's Mutual Aid Association, in- 
forms us he has received up-to-date over 
$1500 for the relief of the firemen and their 
families of the flood and fire-swept districts 
of Ohio. He reports this sum will be greatly 
augmented when all reports of donations will 
have been turned in. He states the mem- 
bers of the department are responding liber- 
ally, many of the fire chiefs donating $100. 
Mayor Rolph is also reported doing every- 
thing in his power in aiding the good work. 
Next week we expect to publish a full report 
of all donations 



This week we had the pleasure of spending 
an hour or two in perusing Edward E. Cro- 
ker's recent work on "Fire Prevention," 
published by Dodd, Mead & Co. of New York. 
Many of the ideas which it contains are not 
new; in fact are known and have been known 
and used by every intelligent fireman thiough- 
out the country, while what original views on 
fire prevention it possesses, it is said, ema- 
nated from Fire Chief Kenlon, the present 



Politics Versus Efficiency. 

Under the above caption, a recent issue of 
Fire and Water Engineering in an editorial, 
referring to politicians meddling in firedepart- 
ment matters, quotes a Portsmouth, Ohio, 
Director of Public Safety as saying: "Cheap, 
dirty politics from jealous 'soreheads' is re- 
sponsible for the present situation. They 
seek to delay us in every manner possible." 
It also upholds the courts in deciding that fire 
chiefs and fire commissioners have the right 
to decide what fire apparatus and other sup- 
plies they deem best for their departments. 
The editorial follows. We quote: 

"The hardest place to live in is that where 
polities predominate to the detriment of the 
public service. Petty politics is fatal to the 
good management of any city department, 
besides being a destroyer of moral and decent 
government. How is it possible to control 
efficiency in the fire service when the chief 
has to steer his course through I he crooked 
channels laid out for him by Ihe peanut alder- 
man who is legally his director, but intellec- 
tually only fit to wipe his shoes. 

"This is the principal reason why so many 
fire departments appear incompetent to con- 
trol fires, and the chief engineer is reluctant 
to expose the cause, fearing he might lose his 
position. It certainly is most exasperating 
and intolerable to a competent and honest 
man. We have in mind many cities where 
chief engineers have to be subservient to the 
will of the political boss, knowing that to act 
otherwise would mean his being ousted from 
a position which has cost a lifetime to reach. 

"A conspicuous case of this small politics 
comes from Portsmouth, O., where the direc- 
tor is called to account for adopting a reliable 
fire alarm system at a very reasonable figure. 
The action of the Director of Safety is con- 
demned by the little fellows because they 
were not consulted about the matter, and 
they are now engaged in despoiling the good 
name of their fair city. These politicians do 
not know that one small fire would cost more 
than the price of the fire alarm system in 
question, showing how important it is that, 
in this particular instance, onlv the best 
should be selected. Through the blindness of 



their political objection to anything being 
adopted in which they had no say. they do 
not realize that their city could be destroyed 
in very short notice without a reliable system 
of notifying the department when a fire has 
been discovered. 

"No doubt what the diitctor says is correct : 
"Cheap, dirty politics from jealous 'sore- 
heads' is responsible for the present situa- 
tion. The politicians are seeking to delay us 
in every manner possible." A great mary 
i courts have decided that fire commissioners' 
and directors of public safety have the ritiht 
to decide what apparatus or supplies are best 
for the city, and this should undoubtedly be 
the power of the safety department in 
question. " 

Mayor Threatens to Use Axe. 

At a spirited meeting of the Mission Pro- 
motion Association last Monday night, at 
which Mayor Rolph was the principal speaker, 
wherein a wide range of subjects were dis- 
cussed, among them the present dissension 
between the Fire Board and the Civil Service 
Commission, his Honor declared if the pres- 
ent controversy between the existing boards 
did not cease he proposed to take drastic 
measures. He prefaced his remarks by stat- 
ing that in a recent evening paper Charles 
Wesley Reed had accused him of promoting 
harmony with an axe. After warming up to 
his subject his Honor is reported to have said: 

"Yes, and I intend to have harmony even 
if I have to use the axe. This dissension 
must stop. If a member of the city govern- 
ment is not in sympathy with the administra- 
tion he can get out and the sooner the better. 

"In the Civil Service matter the majority 
of the commission has decided that it is not 
necessary under the Charter to hold physical 
examinations for promotions. In this I be- 
lieve they are right, and I have told them so 
and I intend to stay with them. 

"I believe in holding physical examinations 
of men when they enter the department, but 
it is not necessary every time a man takes an 
examination for a grade higher that he should 
be subjected to a physical test. Some people 
seemingly would sooner have prize fighters 
and pluguglies for firefighters than men who 
have demonstrated that they have brains and 
ability." 

San Diego. 

Declaring that he would not remain a mem- 
ber of a fire department in which new men, 
some of whom had not served their terms of 
probation, are promoted ovtr the heads of 
i old, experienced members of that depart- 
| ment and alleging that favorites are being 
played by fire department officials in San 
Diego, Claude L. Boswell, clerk under Fire 
Chief Almgren, has tendered his resignation 
to take effect immediately. Chief Almgren 
charges that Boswell had violated rules gov- 
erning members of the department while on 
duty. 

It is said the boys of engine 4 are so taken 
up wilh Captain Kehoe that it is doubtful if 
they consent to him taking a transfer to a 
truck company. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Labor Council Endorse Civil Service. 



At the regular Monday night meeting of 
the Civil Service Commission, a set of reso- 
lutions adopted by the Labor Council of this 
city were read endorsing the stand of Com- 
missioners Brady and Rosenthal and Mayor 
Rolph for sustaining them in regard to ex- 
aminations and the certification of eligibles 
in the fire department. The resolutions 
strongly condemn the members of the de- 
partment who have appealed to the courts to 
prevent the examinations without including 
physical tests for first and second fire engi- 
neers. 

The Council also forwarded to the clerk of 
the Board of Supervisors for official filing 
copies of the resolutions adopted by the 
Council congratulating Mayor Rolph for sus- 
taining a majority of the Board of Civil Ser- 
vice Commissioners for their act in striving 
to eliminate politics from the fire department. 

Sufficient Fnnds on Hand. 

Auditor Boyle, it is reported, has addressed 
a communication to Mayor Rolph, inquiring 
when the next award of medals to firemen 
who have distinguished themselves by heroic 
service will be made, and calling attention to 
the fact that no award has been made for 
two years. The Scannell, Rainey and Sulli- 
van medals are referred to, and the auditor 
states that there are ample amounts in the 
funds for these medals to have awards made 
now. The selection of the men deemed most 
worthy of having the medals conferred on 
them is left to a committee composed of the 
mayor, the auditor and the chief engineer of 
the fire department. A report must first be 
given by the fire department officials as to 
acts of bravery deserving special notice. 

For Flowers for all occasions call up /Mission 
59S8. J. J. O'Connor, 2756 Mission Street. 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

The Fire Commission met Friday, April 4, 
and approved the Administrative Report, 
from which we take the following: 

From the chief engineer, reporting having 
made the following assignments for duly of 
temporary engineers who were restored to 
their regular rank and position of hoseman, 
to take effect from March 16th: 

G. C. Shea to engine 12. 

J. <'. Hi-rlthy to engine 34. 

E. J. Moran to engine 1">. 

B. A. Derham to engine I. 

Geoi'ift' Hall to engine 9. 

John Hannan to engine 4. 

Fred Reckenbeil to engine 0. 

Engene Mulligan to engine 42. 

Win. Crosby to engine 1!'. Approved. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, re- 
porting that the 5,000 feet of 8ft inch hose 
furnished by the American Rubber Works 
has successfully met all requirements of the 
specifications and coutracl nod recomraendii y 
that the same be accepted by the department. 
Approved. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, ub 
mi t ting a communication from w. P. Delany, 



machinist at the corporation yard, for 17J 
days' pay on account of sickness. Also re- 
commending that Machinists W. H. Brown, 
J. J. Moholy and J. J. Beatty be allowed 
salary for 6, 5J and 4 days' pay respectively, 
for the same reason. Allowed. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the following application for transfer 
be granted, to take effect April 1: 

L. Schatz, from hoseman engine 29 to hose- 
man engine 17. Approved. 

From the chief engineer, reporting having 
detailed Wm. Nolan, hoseman engine 2, as 
operator to Battalion Chief Britt, vice Rich- 
ard Witts, assigned as hoseman engine 2, to 
take effect April 1. Approved. 

From the chief engineer, reporting having 
made the following temporary assignment of 
probationary members, to take effect from 
April 1: 

Chas. A. Gray, to engine 2 as hoseman. 

Wm. Petry, to engine 29 as hoseman. 

P. Golden, to fireboat 2 as hoseman. 

V. E. Wilson, to engine 2 as hoseman. 

Geo. M. Healy, to engine 17 as hoseman. 

E. J. Doherty, to engine 35 as hoseman. 

G. G. Derham, to engine 20 as hoseman. 

J. J. Woods, to truck 5 as truckman. 

S. Hatfield, to engine 16 as engineer. Ap- j 
proved. 

From the harnessmakersof the corporation 
yard, requesting that their salaries be in- , 
creased from $4.25 to $4.50 per diem. In 
view of the fact that the budget estimates I 
for the ensuing fiscal year, in which $4.25 i 
per diem is provided for harnessmakers, had 
been filed with the Board of Supervisors be- 
fore the receipt of this communication your 
committee recommend that a communication 
be sent the Finance Committee. 



alarms of fire. Put over. 

From the Civil Service Commission, author- 
izing temporary appointments to non-civil 
service positions for the month of April. 
Brandenstein, Pfaeffle and Hammer "aye," 
Dillon "no." 

The transfer of D. O'Donnell, from truck- 
man truck 5 to truckman truck 8 was laid 
over. 

The resignation of Alexander George was 
again referred to the Administrative Com- 
mittee. After some discussion Dillon favortd 
giving him a leave of absence for thirty days, 
but agreed to have the matter referred to the 
committee. 



Calendar of matters presented to the Board 
of Fire Commissioners April 4, 1913: 

Opinion of the City Attorney in the matter 
of the petition of Joseph Finn, engineer en- 
gine 22, to be allowed credit for service in 
the department from Jan. 5, 1892. Definitely 
postponed. 

Complaint against Thos. Sheehan, hoseman 
engine 40, for a violation of the rules govern- 
ing members of the department, absent from 
duty on sick leave. Charges filed. 

From the Webb Motor Fire Apparatus 
Company, requesting an extension of time 
until May 20 on its contract for motor driven 
chemical. Referred to Administrative Com- 
mitt eel 

Consideration of new rule relative to mem- 
bers filing complaints against superiors. 
Brandenstein, Hammer and Pfaeffle "aye/' 
Dillon "no. " 

Matter of imposing penalty on Henry 
Welch, hoBeman engine 25, for being under 
the influence of intoxicating liquor when re- 
porting for duty on March 1. Pul over one 
week. 

Civil Service certification of .his. .1 Woods 
for appointment as truckman in the depart- 
ment. Appointed subject to assignment by 
chief. 

M:ii i < ■ r of consideration of bids received for 
furnishing caul system for responding to 



Los Angeles. 

An elderly woman whose identity has not 
been established, went to mail a letter at Los 
Angeles one day recently, her eyesight being 
poor and instead of mailing her letter, she 
rang in a fire alarm in front of the Baker 
Iron Works. Thinking that a fire in that sec- 
tion might prove a dangerous one, equipment 
from several stations was rushtd at once. 
While the fire truck of the station at Pasadena 
avenue and Avenue Nineteen was hurraing to 
the fire, it collided with a motor truck driven 
by Don Phillips. W. E. Brown, a fireman, 
was thrown from the fire truck to the street 
and sustained a fractured wrist and other 
injuries. Phillips also was injured. When 
it was found to be a false alarm an investi- 
gation was started and members of the de- 
partment learned that an elderly woman had 
been seen to walk up to the box and appar- 
ently ring in an alarm in an attempt to mail 
a letter. 



Lieut. Siewert of engine 12, detailed to the 
corporation yard over a month ago as demon- 
strator on motor apparatus, is still on the job. 
Bill only works eight hours and has three 
home-made cooked meals every day and even- 
ings to himself. Hang on to it, Bill; good 
things are scarce these days. He says its 
the greatest snap he's had since he left the 
village. 

Don't miss this! Archie, familiarly known 
as "Porky" Jensen and Harvey Griffiths, 
both well known to members of the depart- 
ment, are financially interested in a line 
launch at San Pedro Point, on the Ocean 
Shore road. They extend a general invita- 
tion t<> their friends who are on fishing or 

hunting hen! to avail I heliisol VeS of ;t da\ *S 

sport. They also extend a general invitation 
to members of the department to bring their 
wives and sweethearts. Forfuriher particu- 
lars address or call up any member of en- 
gine I i 

Subscribe for the Pacii ic FlRl man. 



rdephow IUiuLi 1255 

L. J. BORCK, im t ailor 

MAKl S \ SPI CIALT) Of 

PIRBMBIN*S '. UNIFORMS 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN sills 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



American -La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
660 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



\Z\ 



Magnolia Nurseries' 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations arid Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Rracii Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission. 2Jth street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Dougluss and 24th streets. 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



WM. F. EIGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. f. F. D 



Ph„„.. * Doujla. 4934 
""™" / Home C 2842 



Phon, 



i West . 586 
'HomeS 3174 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

IVlephones VarV 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 



123 POST ST 21 10-2114 FILLMORE ST. 



Phone Douglas 4716 



Home C 2458 



1 12 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 



717 K Street 
Saciamenlo 



LAMANETBROS 

HATS. UNDERWEAR. ETC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



THE best attention and service for the man who car- 
ries a HOWARD Watch - not on account of the 
watch, but because he is likely to be that kind 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does sug- 
gest a man who appreciates quality and is quia- able to 
, know whether he is getting it or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Walch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
p iv for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed a1 the Fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attached from the 
IT jewel tdouble roller) in ;i Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at ?4 i, t>> ti ■ 
jewel at $150 and the Edward Howard model 

Admiral SigFbee has written n III He book, 

•■The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 

record ot his own Howard in the V N.iv>. 

you'll enjoy ii. Drop us ■> post-card, Dept. -V 

■ i a copy, 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Man 



EAGLESON & CO. 

Importers and Manufacturer! 

MENS FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1118 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 



Telephone Doujlm 287 1 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ&-SON 



WARRANT BROKERS 



Phone Market 5417 



630 KEARNY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



T. H. KILCO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRA 

We Do Artistic 

Job Printing 




VOL. X.-NO. 21 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Physical Examination for Chief Officers 



A city on the Pacific Coast (referr- 
ing to San Francisco) is having quite 
a time in trying to decide whether or 
not the candidates for promotion to 
assistant chiefships in the fire depart- 
ment should undergo a test as to their 
soundness of wind and limb. The 
Civil Service rules appear to require 
such an examination in all cases, but 
the mayor does not believe that such 
an ordeal should be undergone by 
those who are next to the chief, in 
which opinion the majority of the 
Civil Service Board agree. As is 
usual, the merits of the case are be- 
fogged by charges and counter- 
charges that there is political intrigue 
involved. Then, too, this particular 
case is complicated by the fact that 
the uniformed head of the department 
is appointed from the force without 
examination, whence it can, and has 
happened that an officer rated on the 
civil service list as captain commands 
men who rank above him on the civil 
service list as battalion or assistant 
chief. 

It is probable that most fair-minded 
nvi will hold the view that those who 
win their way in large departments 
above the rank of captain, let us say, | 
should not be subjected, when they 
seek further promotion, to the same 
rigorous physical test that is required 
of a recruit. Certainly a chief officer 
must be able to withstand exposure 
and must possess a sound mind in a 
healthy body, or his physical strength 
may fail him at inopportune times. 

But a chief officer's experience and 
brains are, or should be, worth more 



to his department than his muscles. 
His business is to direct other men, 
and rarely is he, or ought he to be, 
called upon for the strenuous physical 
effort required of those of lower sta- 
tion in the department. It is also to 
be borne in mind that, except in very 
exceptional cases, promotion to the 
rank of battalion or assistant chief 
does not come to a fireman until he 
has passed the zenith of his athletic 
prowess. He may still have a punch 
powerful enough to fell an ox, but his 
limbs are usually not as supple as they 
once were; work on the parallel bars 
and with the Indian clubs has lost 
much of its charm, and the other de- 
lights of younger days usually lack a 
good deal of their attractiveness by 
the time a man gets a chance to become 
a chief officer. 

Nevertheless, he may be physically, 
as well as mentally, fitted forthe post. 
Many a bad fire has been fought and 
won under the direction of officers 
whose hair was grizzled, whose bodies 
were rheumatic and who could not 
have skipped one hundred times to 
save their lives. — Fireman's Herald. 

The fateful anniversary of April 18, 
is the date promised for the delivery 
to the city of Hillsborough of the new 
auto chemical fire engine for the pro- 
tection of that municipality, The an- 
nouncement was made by Trustee 
Samuel Knight at the board meeting 
last Tuesday. He also stated that the 
hose ordered was ready for testing. 

The famous Plaza Del Mar bath 
house at Santa Barbara was totally 
destroyed by fire, the cause of wl icn 

is unknown. The lOFS is estimated at 
over $. r )().0C0. 



Two-Platoon and State Legislatures. 

The advocates of the two-platoi n 
system for fire departments who 
hoped that their State law-makers 
would help them where the municipal 
authorities would not, must regaid 
current happenings with rather mixed 
feelings. While the Nebraska «i ate 
land legislature appear to have or- 
|dained the double-shift plan for Lin- 
coln, other States have shown no in- 
Iclination to follow suit, Ir.diana being 
the last to kill the bill in committee. 

Interest now centers on Ohio and 
New York, where carefully planned 
campaigns l.ave been waged on behalf 
of the change. As we do not pose as 
prophets we make no forecast of the 
result, beyond saying that it will be 
interesting whichever way the deci- 
sion goes, which strikes us as an en- 
tirely safe thing to predict.— Fire- 
man's Herald. 

Four Chicago Firemen Injured. 

A press dispatch of April 7 says four 
firemen were injured, two of them 
probably fatally, in a fire which de- 
stroyed beef house No. 2 of Armour 
& Co. in the Union Stockyards. The 
loss on the building and its contents 
is estimated at 1500,000. 

The fire, because of tie low wat<r 
pressure, gained rapid l<;<v;>. Brd 
after being apparently ur.der i< i n< I 
for a short time broke out attain in 
several places following a number i f 
explosions believed to have In i n 
caused by the blowing out of ammo- 
nia tanks. 

The must seriously injured wcie 
Captain George T. Foley, right leg 
and both arms broken, and I'qinian 

John Pattersen, hurt internally. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Veteran Firemen to Hold May Reunion. 



The Veteran Firemen's Association 
of this city will hold a reunion on May 
25. The board of directors has decided 
to give an outing and issue a souvenir 
book containing a history of the fire 
department from its organization in 
1850 up the present time. 

A committee has been appointed to 
attend to the details and Paul Boiler 
has been given charge of the book. 
Only duly authorized solicitors ap- 
pointed by Boiler will have right to 
solicit advertisements. It is to be dis- 
tributed free. 

As several fake propositions were 
foisted upon the public last year, the 
Veteran Firemen's Association desires 
to inform the public not to pay any at- 
tention to solicitors unless they show 
their credentials. 

Two N. Y. Firemen Mortally Injured. 

Acting Battalion Chief Edward Con- 
nolly of the New York Fire Depart- 
ment, while racing to the scene of a 
fire in his fast light lunabout in Ridge 
avenue, Brooklyn, at 9 o'clock one 
evening last week, and hook and lad- 
der motor truck 156, both turned into 
Lorimer street at the same time, at 
that dangerous crossways where Lori- 
mer and Berry streets and Manhattan 
avenue meet. The truck struck the 
runabout with such force that it was 
crumpled into a twisted mass, while 
the chief and his driver, Matthew 
Robinson, were thrown ten feet. Both 
men hadtheirskulls fractured and both 
were carried, dying, to St. Catherine's 
Hospital. Robinson was still con- 
scious as they lifted him into the am- 
bulance, and he begged the surgeons 
to keep the news from his mother. 

Connolly had charge of the Thirty- 
fifth Battalion district and lives at 131 
Bedford avenue, Brooklyn. He is 33 
years old. Robinson's home is at 907 
Lorimer street, and he is 47 years old. 

Petaluma. 

At an informal meeting of the Board 
of Fire Commissioners last week, a 
permit for a steam boiler at the tire 
repair works was granted under cer- 
tain conditions, the work to be ap- 
proved by the fire chief and President 
Fredericks. 

The members inspected samples of 



fire hose prepar 
type desired in 
ment. A small 
dered at first. 

That the fire 
tained until a 
for fighting fire 
being held that 
ratus should be 



atory to selecting the 
the local fire depart- 
quantity will be or- 

horse should be re- 
second motor vehicle 
is had was decided, it 
an emergency appa- 
always on hand. 



Fire Insurance Companies Scored. 

A Chicago dispatch, dated April 5 
says a report bristling with criticism 
of methods employed by fire insurance 
companies in the issuance of policies 
was made to Judge Burke by the spe- 
cial grand jury which has been inves- 
tigating the so-called arson trust. 

The report declares that 50 per cent 
of -the fires in Chicago are of incen- 
diary origin. This condition of affairs, 
the report asserts, is due to laxity on 
the part of the fire insurance compa- 
nies in examining the property in- 
sured and the relaxation of vigilance 
after a policy has been granted. 

Theatre Fire Protection. 



Every theatre in Denver, Colorado, 
is now guarded at each performance 
by a fire warden. This cfficer is to 
march across the stage in front of the 
curtain that the ardience may know 
that he is on the job. He will then 
retire and keep watch for any fires 
that may break out. He will also see 
to it that the aisles are kept clear and 
that the exits are not blocked. 

The fire apparatus at the central fire 
station has been removed to the quar- 
ters at the new Spokane City Hall. 
The auto hose wagon formerly in use 
at the central station has been rebuilt 
with a chemical attachment and will 
be used to replace the horse-drawn 
vehicles at the Manito station. The 
new "bull moose," which is the larg- 
est auto in the department, will be 
used at the central station. — Under- 
writers' Report. 

Fire of unknow n origin recently de- 
stroyed the big pkntof the Universal 
Film Company at Hollywood. The 
loss amounts to $7,0C0 with insurance 
of $5,000. Employes of the concern 
were unable to save their own prop- 
erty in the offices and dressing rooms. 
The plant employed nearly 150 people 
and was one of the largest moving 



picture concerns in the West. Facili- 
ties were so complete that four pic- 
tures could be taken at one time. 

Demise of Los Angeles Municipal News. 

The following two excerpts, from 
the Pacific Printer and the Stockton 
Mail, commenting on the demise of the 
Los Angeles Municipal News, is self 
explanatory: 

[From the Pacific Printer.] 

The City Council of Los Angeles has 
ordered an investigation of the Muni- 
cipal News of that city, following a 
request for bids to renew annual con- 
tract for publication. Btfcre this ac- 
tion was taken, two of the etuncilrren 
severely criticised the municipal re ws- 
paper, asserting that it is useless, 
wasted the money of the taxpayeis, 
and is not wanted by the people. 
Sixty thousand copies a week were 
at first issued, but thirty thoufand is 
the present edition (r'ue to effort to 
keep within the appropriation.) It 
was stated that the newspaper spends 
the $36,000 a year received from the 
City Treasurer, in addition to the en- 
tire proceeds from its advertising, 
and it was further asserted that four 
employes, besides carriers, weie suffi- 
cient to conduct a weekly paper, while 
the Municipal News has twelve or fif- 
teen persons on the pay roll. 

[From the Stockton Mai].] 

A newspaper must be positive; it 
must have principles and stand by 
them; it must make enemies to have 
friends. To command respect it must 
have an unequivocal editorial policy 
and make its position clear on every 
issue of importance that comes up. 
There are many people who do not 
agree with a newspaper's policy who 
will take it and read it if the paper is 
fair, as well as positive, in its views. 
But a wishy-washy, please-pardon n e 
newspaper is held in universal con- 
tempt by the American public, and 
for that reason the Los Angeles Muni- 
cipal News, as a newspaper, is r.ot 
worth the ink it takes toprinta period. 



ROSENBLlM=ABRAHAM CO. Inc. 

TAILORS FOR MEIN 

IIOS MARKET ST. 

ODD FELLOWS BUILDING 

Phone Market 1503 

UNIFORMS OUR SPECIALTY UNICN LABEL USED 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

During the three years that have 
elapsed since "The Squaw Man" was 
last presented in the Alcazar there 
have been many requests for its revi- 
val, but not until Charles Waldron was 
engaged to lead the company did the 
management feel justified inaceeding, 
because of the unusual physical and 
temperamental qualifications essential 
to an adequate interpretation of the 
tittle role. Mr. Waldron is not only 
richly endowed with them, but he has 
played the part with marked success 
in the East and is familiar with all its 
requirements. Consequently the finest 
dramatic depiction of life on the gone- 
forever frontier that ever was written 
is announced for next week, commenc- 
ing Monday night, with Madeleine 
Louis as an augmented support also 
in the cast. Miss Loins will be seen 
as Nat-u-Rich, the squaw; Fred J. 
Butler as Big Bill, the ranch foreman, 
in which he scored a hit when the play 
was last seen at the Alcazar; Thomas 
Chatterton as Henry, Earl of Kerhill; 
Clara Beyers ss Diana, his wife; Lady 
Elizabeth, his mother, AdeleBelgarde; 
Lady Mabel, his sister, Rhea Mitchell; 
Mr. Petrie, hissolicitor, EdmundLowe; 
Sir John Applegate, Diana's cousin, 
John A. Butler; Mrs. Chichester-Chi- 
cester Jones, and American Lady, Pearl 
Cook; Shorty, acowboy, BurtWesner; 
Old Andy, another, Lee Millar; Tab- 
wana, a Ute Chief, Louis Bennison; 
Baco White, an interpreter, Charles 
Moul; Cash Hawkins, a "rustler," Roy 
Clements; and Nick, a barkeeper, 
Walter Belasco, with a score of other 
people in minor roles. 

Empress Theatre. 

A novel array of attractions will be 
uncorked at the Empress Theatre 
Sunday afternoon, headlined by "The 
Diving Girls." a spectacular aquatic 
novelty that has received unstinted 
praise from press and 1 ublic in many 
of the principal cities of the United 
States. Mr. Neil McKinley, an ex- 
temporaneous funster is the feature 
attraction by reason of his great suc- 
cess wherever he has appeared, lie 
is the season's big comedy hit and has 
been a veritable furore everywhere. 
"Raving Just for Fun" is the title of 
his specialty. Burns, Armstrong and 
Fullen, the three varsity fellows, are 
graduates from the University of 
Washington. They will be seen in a 



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Campus Rehearsal." Mr. and Mrs. 
Ward Caulfield, presenting a delecta-' 

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Frank Finney, will be another pleas- 
ant feature. For artistic finish, smart 
dressing and swift action, Paddock & 
Paddock, song and dance divei sifiers, 
are said to surpass all others. Unique 
and interesting is the novelty offered 
by Stith & Gardnier, whose perform- 
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various other artich p. Menlo & Sterl- 
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Pictures will be other valuable addi- 
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before Judge Murasky Monday, April 14. 
providing another continual ce is not asktd 
for, there being Iwo already. 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietoi 

To whom all checks and money orders should 
be made payable. 
H. G PRESTON Business M 



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ADVERTISEMENTS 
liisurtxid on* the' most favorable berms. esbeciallj lai 

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Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6861 



Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908, at thf. 
Postollicc at San Francisco. Cat., under the Act i.f Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



Vacations in the department will start the 
first day of May this year. 

The Nebraska House of Representatives 
has passed the bill providing for 'he two- 
platoon system in the South Omaha Fire "be- 
part men t. 

The firemen's dne-day-off in five bill for 
Taunton, Lowell and Northampton, Mass , 
has passed the Senate with flying colors by a 
vote of 23 to 3. The bill carries a referen- 
dum attachment. 

Owing to not receiving copy of donations 
fn>m Captain fjreorge Brown of monies col- 
lected by him in aid of firemen and their 
families in the flood districts of the middle 
Western states, we are unable to publish 
same, but hojte to do so next week. 

Last week we erred in stating the resigna- 
tion of Alexander George was referred to the 
Administrative Committee. It should, have 
read Commissioner Dillon moved that he 
'George) be granted 30 days leave of absenee 
in the hope that he would reconsider bis de- 
termination to resign.. The other commis- 
sioners voted that it be referred to the com- 
mittee. 

A satisfactory preliminary test of Gleason's 
high pressure valve was given Tuesday at the 
foot of Stockton street. Mr. Gleason expects 
to make some minor changes which will aid 
materially its efficiency and submit it to a 
board of engineers, when another test will be 
held. Among those present were Commis- 
sioners Hammer, Dillon, Brandenstein and 
Praeffl;; Chief Murphy, Sam Bermingham, 
Charlie Tabor of the Gorham Engineering and 
M 'tor Fire Apparatus Company and others. 

At the regular Monday night meeting of 
lh' Civil Service Commission the Board 
created the position of chief deputy commis- 
sioner of the Board of Public Works and 
named Frederick J. Churchill, present Secre- 
tary of the Board, for the place, at a salary 
of .$25') a month. Fire department matters 
were not discussed owing to the injunction 
proceedings brought h\ Battalion Chief Max- 
well, enjoining the Board from eliminating 
the physical test examinations for assistant 
engineers. The case will be threshed out 



Two Platoon a Success. 

The Underwriters' Report, discussing the 
inauguration of Seattle's two- platoon system, 
which went into effect April 1, says of it : 

The new double platoon system was inau- 
gurated by the Seattle Fire Department on 
April 1st. and while it has been in operation 
only a few days it is thought that the change 
will result in greatly increased efficiency and 
will tend to give better fire protection to the 
entire city. This change, adopted by the city 
by amendment to the charter at, a recent 
election, is only one of the plans being put 
into effect Lo give better protection. 

The City Council has voted large sums of 
money for additional stations, which are 
being designed and will be erected during the 
coming summer, and it has been decided to 
make use of some of the old appropriations 
for apparatus. The money voted fot equip- 
ment during the past four or five years and 
still unexpended was intended for horse- 
drawn wagons, and the wording of the ordi- 
nances has now been changed to allow the 
purchase of modern auto propelled machin* s. 
Specifications for the new equipment are. 
now being prepared by the chief of thede-j 
partment. 

Nominations for Directors Scannell Club. 

San Francisco. April 8, 1913. 

To the Officers a"d Members S. F. Fire Department. 

Geritlemenr— Eliminations for Directors of 

the Scannell Club are now in order. Nine 
directors are to be elected. All nominations 
must be made in writing over the signature 
of the proposer. You are requested to con- 
sider carefully the qualifications t.f each man 
whom you intend to nominate. Up* n the 
Board of Directors of the organization will 
devolve the duty of upholding the Civil Ser- 
vice rights of the members of vour depart- 
ment and of taking such steps as will secure 
improved working conditions therein. 

Nominations will close on Tuesday, April 
15, 1913, and should be mailed to Edward 
Gallatin, Secretary Scannell Club. 368 Fell 
street. 

Please bring this notice to the atw niion of 
your fellow members. 

Alexander George. 

Secretary Scannell Club. 

Going to Be the Head. 

In the future, deputy chiefs in the Newark, 
N* J , Fire Department cannot order any 
change in the arrangement of fire fighting 
equipment on an apparatus "or otherwise 
disarrange the system now in vogue" without 
the consent of the chief engineer. This rule 
was adopted by the fire board recently at the 
suggestion of Chief Moore, who said that 
"the chief of the department is going to be 
the bead, and not any deputy chief." 

In explaining his reason for wanting the 
rule adopted. Chief Moore declared that 
Deputy Chief M*. Dermitt had given orders to 



all the engine companies in his division to 
stretch a long length of hose at i\ti<, fire, 
and to use a larger suction on their engines 
than has been the custom. Chief Moore did 
not approve of either order and rescinded 
them. In order to make it more binding, 
however, the chief declared that he wanted 
the board to fix the rule. 

Around the Bay Cities. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

The Walnut Creek Fire Depart merit is 
about to purchase some new fire hose. I 
Salituri has bin's from a number of firms 

The Oakland Commissioners have disruv- 
ererl a way to evade the ruling of the Chart* r. 
which provides that if a man is retired for 
disability prior to the regular age limit, he 
shall have his position back in case of recov- 
ery. Assistant Chief McDonald was retired 
on the disability clause, and as an nreistant 
chief could not be appointed until McDonald 
reached the age limit for retirement, the 
commissioners created the position of substi- 
tute assistant chief. 

The new electric lights in Alameda will be 
used for the purpose of directing attention lo 
the tire alarm boxes. All globes within fifty 
feet of an alarm box will have a red band 
with the words "Fire Alarm" in white let- 
ters. In this way an alarm box can be imme- 
diately located. 

Thief Short and the hook and ladder com- 
pany of the Oakland central fire house were 
called out at 1 o'clock last Friday, April 4. 
to rescue Mrs. Belle Cudrav, a photographer, 
from her husband's studio. She became so 
absorbed in her work that nhefailed to notice 
the hour of midnight had passed, when the 
building was locked for the night. She noti- 
fied the police by telephone and Chief Short 
was detailed to rescue her. 



Girls Fight Firemen. 

When a slight fire occurred on the fourth 
floor of the loft building, 30 West Twenty- 
first street, Manhattan, New York, one given 
up entirely to tailoring work for women, fire 
drill, if ever practiced, was forgotten and 
there was an immediate rush of girls to the 
elevator from the sixth and seventh flours. 
The elevator did not come up from below, as 
the hoy was "commandeered" by the fire- 
men to help them to get the lines of hose 
upstairs. 

As the lieutenant in charge of the firemen 
had expected this, he had lined up fix firemen 
across the stairs on the fourth floor. These 
tried, but in vain, to persuade the girls to re- 
turn to the upstairs lofts, and assured them 
to no purpose that there was no, danger. The 
girls, however, thought otherwise and fought 
and scratched the firemen and refuFt'd to be- 
lieve there was no need for them to clatter 
up the stairway. 

As they would not retreat. Lieutenant 
Kearny ordered the hose to be turned on 
them. That was just too much. Their ranks 
broke and they went back upstairs. 

Lieutenant Kearny, however, is a man 
marked out for future vengeance from the 
indignant girls. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

The Fire Commission met Friday, April 11, 
and approved the Administrative Report, 
from which we take the following: 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the position of Harry Piper be changec 
from hoseman to stoker of engine 20, to take 
effect from date. Approved. 

From the chief engineer, reporting having 
temporarily assigned J. R. Maxwell and Jas. 
Liydeit to perform the duties of first and 
second assistant chief engineers, commencing 
April 1. Approved. 

From Wm. Moore, stoker engine 16, re- 
questing that he be allowed salary of engi- 
neer of said company while acting as such 
from March 16 to April 1. In view of (he 
fact that there was an eligible list to draw 
from during this time that Moore was acting 
and in accordance with a rnle of the Civil 
Service Commission that such demands would 
not be approved, your committee recommend 
that the request be denied. 

From Chas. Shay, hoseman engine 12, re- 
questing that he be allowed salary as engi- 
neer of said company from February 1 to 
March 16, during all of which time he served 
in that capacity and performed the duties of 
engineer. In this case there being no eligible 
list of engineers to select from your commit- 
tee recommend that this request be granted, 
subject to the approval of the Civil Service 
Commission. 

From Battalion Chief Britt, submilting a 
complaint against R. Witts, hoseman engine 
2. for neglecting to obey an order of his supe- 
rior officer on April 2. After an investiga- 
tion of this matter \our committee find that 
the same was due to a misunderstanding of 
the order, and upon the recommendation of 
Captain Kehoe of engine 4, who issued the 
order, we recommend that the complaint be 
dismissed. 

From Battalion Chief Murray, sebmitting 
a complaint against Chas. McLaughlin, hose- 
man engine 16, for failing to respond to an 
alarm of fire with his company on April 2. 
McLaughlin appeared before the committee 
and admitted the facts of the complaint and 
your committee recommend that he be sus- 
pended for three da\ s as a punishment there- 
for, this being I is second offense. 

From Howard Holmes, lieutenant engine 4, 
requesting (hat he be allowed salary for the 
month of February l.i the amount of $81.25, 
time off dutj durit g suspension. Recom- 
mend thai he be allowed -alary for all of 
February wilh the exception of fourteen days- 
thai he was deprived of by the Board for a 
violation of the rules Laid over one week. 

From T. F. Carrick, engineer fireboat 1. 
requesting thai he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for lour daj s, without pav, commenc- 
ing on the 12th inst. Granted. 

Calendar of matters | i i Bentid to the Board 
of Fire Commissioner.- April 11, 1913: 

From the civil Set vice Commission, re- 
q i ■■-ting advice as to whether 1 1 1 i ^ Board has 
any objection to tin- acceptance of llie resig 
nation of Robert H. Lockyi ar as engine* r it 



this department under the provisions of Rule 
24 of the Civil Service Commission. Presi 
dent to confer with the Civil Service Com- 
mission. 

Opinion of City Attorney in the matter of 
the petition of Jos. Finn, engineer engine 22, 
to be allowed credit for service in the depart- 
ment from Jan. 5. Referred to Administra- 
tive Committee. 

The matter of imposing penalty on Henry 
Welch, hoseman engine 26, for being under 
the influence of intoxicating liquor when re- 
porting for duty on March I. Deprived of 
salary from date of suspension, up to time of 
pension, Tuesday. April 7. 

Matter of reprimanding D. O'Donnell, 
truckman truck 5, for assaulting Thomas 
Timmons of that company on March 16; also 
transfer of O'Donnell from truck 5 to truck 
8. Put over one week. 

Communication dated March 15, 1913, from 
Alexander George, tendering his resignation 
as driver of relief engine 2. Brandenstein 
moved to accept, Pfatffle seconds, Hammer 
votes "aye," Dillon "no." 

Trial of Thos. E. Sheehan, hoseman engine 
40, for failure to obey orders of his superior 
officers on the 1st day of April. Suspended 
for 30 days from April 4. 

Must Obey City Code. 

Because certain of the members of the 
Savannah, Ga., Fire Department have never 
complied wilh section 625 and section 626 of 
the city code, fifteen firemen have been noti- 
fied that a physical examination must be un- 
dergone at once. The men are also com- 
manded to take the regular oath of office 
and to give bonds in the sum of $100. This 
bond is for good behavior, sobriety and gen- 
eral moral standing. 

The records of the department show that 
the men were apparently given positions with- 
out the usual formalities. If the fifteen un- 
dergo the examination successfully and desire 
to continue in the service of the city, they 
will probably be allowed to remain, but in 
the event that any of those notified feel that 
they cannot comply with the instructions and 
undergo the necessary examination and give 
bond at once then the notice sent out last 
week will serve as a notice of dismissal. 

The fact that the Providence, R. I., fire- 
men have organized a club to push the pen- 
sion bill now pet oil g in the legislature be- 
came; public last week, despite the tfforts of 
'he firemen to keep it secret. 'I he depart- 
ment rules, it is said, prohibit the funning of 
-uch an organization. 

Brockton. Mass., firemen rre prepaiil g to 
ask for ini iva-i d salaries. The raise to be 
asknl for, it is said, contemplates advancing 
captains and lieutenants to $1,400 and $1.31 (I, 
respectively, from $1,200, and the maximum 
rate for the privates to (1,2! u I n in 1 1 e pros, 
-nt maximum of $1,11 0. r l l. ( re are thirteen 
officers whofafi pa j would be increase <»n tin- 

nchedule said to be proDOFed for captain.- and 

ieoti'iiaiits. and 66 or 66 permanent men 
when all of the latter r< ai h the maximum 
pay at the end of four years' service. 



Only men less than 30 years of age will be 
eligible to the fire department of Minneapolis, 
Minn., since the adoption of a recommenda- 
tion by Fire Chief Charles W. Ringtr, by the 
Council Committee on Fire. The age limits 
are to be changed from 21 to 35 years to 21 
to 30 years. 

Members of the Maine Fire Chiefs Club 
were in Augusta last week in suprort of two 
measures pending in the legislature. One 
provides for the presence cf a firtmsn in 
every theatre, concert hall and place of en- 
tertainment in the State w ht n a performance 
is on. The other would make all members of 
the fire department hold office until 60 years 
of age unless removed for intfficitney or for 
some other cause. 



Don't mention mushrooms toCapt. Everscn 
of chemical 12. or any of his family. "Never 
again," the captain says. 

Captain Lerman's Irish Setter Queen was 
awarded second prize at the Golden Gate 
Kennel Club's fourth annual dog show, held 
at the Auditorium this week. 



For Flowers for all occasions call up Missitn 
5988. J. J. O'Connor, 2756 Mission Street. 



Captain O'Farrell of chemical 9 was laid up 
a few days this week with his old complaint- 
stomach trouble. His many friends in and 
out of the department hope for his perma- 
nent recovery, and among them the PACIFIC 
Fireman. 

Wm. H. Augustine, formerly of the com- 
missary department, has a position in the 
contract department with the Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company. He asked after Ed C'huith, 
Pat Brandon. Captain Bulger, Geo. Knorp, 
and had a good word for Commissary Gill. 

Captain Tom Bulger, assistant to Sam 
Bermingham, as outside man — in other words, 
a traveling commission, as he calls it — looks 
ten years younger. To quote his i wn words: 
"I did not reli.-h the job at first but now I 
sleep well and eat three square meals a (iay, 
which I could not do before and am feeling 
fine." He looks it. 



We ran up against Captain Kenneally while 
out testing hydrant pressure in his district 
Thursday. He i» in fine form and is holding 
his own with the best of them. Dame Natuie 
seems to be unusually kind to him. Weha\e 
never been able 10 get the true story of that 
famous outing he took to Mendocino County 
last summer, accompanied by those two old 
vets, Captains Connitf and Lerman and others. 
One thing we did learn. In- beat the bunch 
home, and that's somelhil c in hi.- Favor, 

Subscribe for the PACIFIC KlRKMAN. 



Trlciitviii'- DoqiIm I -5 1 

L. J. BORCK, mi i ah ok 

MAKES A SPECIALTY tit 

FIRKMEN'S ".' UrNII"OWiVI4S 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San FrancUco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



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American -La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
660 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



s : r > 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sis. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...PLORISTS... 



Phone Merrill ■4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding '""' Funeral Orders, 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Garden itig. Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Rrach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Phoenix Fire Appliance Co -the best .ttenHo„ .^ s.™* f »r a* m« who «r- 

1^ l lies a HuVYAKD Watch not on accw 



1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



WM. F. EZGAN 



P l I Dnujlas 4934 



'I Home C 2842 



p, . I West . 586 
Khon " i Home S 3174 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 

123 POST ST. 21 10-21 14 FILLMORE ST. 



1 12 S. Spring Si. 
Los Angeles 



717 K Street 
Sacramenlo 



VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 

1155 GOLDEN OATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. ChI. 

Phone Douslns 4716 

LAMANETBROS 

HATS. UNDERWEAR. ETC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



watch, but because he is likely to be that kind 
of a man. - 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does sur- 
ges) a man who appreciate* quality and is quite able to 
know whether he is getting il or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

Tin pi i e of • ach watch Is fixed at tl i 
torv, and a printed ticket attached— from the 
17-jewel 'double roller) in a Crescent Extra <>r 
Boss Extra gold-filled rase at $4">. to the 23- 
,, u ,t at 5150-^and the Edward Howard model 

Home C 2458 al J 3 iO 

Admiral KigFbee has written a 'ittle 
•'The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record of his own Howard in the IT. S. Navy, 
You"\ erjoj II Drop us a post-card, Dept N. 
and we'll send you * coi v 



EAGLESON & CO. 

Importers and Manufacturer! 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1118 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 



E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Man 

T. H. KILCO 

DIAMONDS A>D JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANI 

We Do Artistic 



Phone Market 5417 



630 KEARNY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Job Printing 




VOL. X.-NO. 22 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Firemen Are Not Workmen. 



A decision of great importance to 
the firemen of Washington and other 
states possessing an eight-hour law, 
was handed down last week hy Judge 
Everett Smith of Seattle, who holds 
that members of fire departments do 
not come within the scope of the 
eight-hour law recently passed in 
Washington. This decision would 
appear also to refute the contention 
of the Tacoma firemen, who believed 
that the state law should be construed 
to mean a three-platoon system for all 
paid fire departments in Washington. 

JudgeSmith'sdecision arose through 
the action of the marine engineers, 
stokers and pilots of the Seattle fire- 
boats seeking an injunction prevent- 
ing the introduction of the two-platoon 
system among them on April 2, as 
they had been granted an eight-hour 
tour of duty by the City Council. 

The court held that, though the 
two-platoon ordinance was passed by 
the City Council on October 17, 1912, 
it did imi become effective until the 
referendum vote approved it on No- 
vember 5, 1912. The court holds that, 
if it were not for the referendum vote, 
the eight-hour law for marine firemen 
passed by the council on January 27, 
1913, would supercede the two-platoon 
law; thai the voters, having directly 
expressed their favor for the two- 
platoon law, it should govern as the 
last word on the subject. It was also 
contended by the fireboal men that 
the two-platoon law was in conflict 
With the stale eig h I ■ hour law for 
labor, and on I his content ion the court 

found that members (, f fire depart- 



ments are not laborers in the eyes of 
the law. 

It has also been held by Seattle's 
legal department that the two-platoon 
system, which went into effect April 
2, is obligatory and cannot be altered 
by the City Council. The two assis- 
tant and the three battalion chiefs 
proposed to the council that they 
would forego the two-platoon provi- 
sions and remain on duty continuously 
as at present, providing a fair raise 
in salary was accorded each of them 
and they were allowed twenty-four 
hours off each fourth day. While no 
mention was made of the amount of 
increase, it is understood that they 
expected to receive $50 a month addi- 
tional. The Corporation Counsel now 
declares that the City Council has not 
the power to accept this proposition 
and cannot waive any of the provi- 
sions of the two-platoon law as passed 
by the voters of Seattle. 

Los Angeles. 

The new $10,000 Gorham motor- 
driven combination pumping engine 
and hose wagon, recently purchased 
by the city, arrived last week. It has 
140-horse power and will he placed in 
the engine house at Avenue Fifty- 
ninth and Pasadena avenue in the 
Highland Park district. 

The fire commission has given its 
approval to the estimate of expendi- 
tures for the lire department for the 
next fiscal year. The total amount 
asked lor is $911,465, of which $618,- 
440 is to he used for salaries. $80,500 
for new lire houses. $lliti.. r >f>0 for new- 
lire apparatus. $9,139 for lire hydrants 
and $303,639 for equipment. 



Salaries of Los Angeles Firemen. 

An ordinanee has passed at Los 
Angeles fixing the personnel and 
monthly compensation of the fire de- 
partment as follows: One chief en- 
gineer, $250; 1 assistant chief engi- 
neer, $175; 1 superintendent of en- 
gines and machinery, $150; 2 battalion 
chiefs, each $150; 1 secretary of the 
department, 1140; 1 assistant secre- 
tary, $75; 13 captains (first class) $125 
each; 16 captains (second class) $120 
each; 37 lieutenants, $105 each; 2 
lieutenants (second class) who shall 
act as deputy fire marshals, $100 each; 
11 engineers (first class) 120 each: 17 
engineers (second class) $115 each; 14 
auto firemen, $100 each; 269 firemen, 
$80 per month each, during his first 
year of service in said department, 
$85 per month during his second year 
of service in said department, $90 per 
month during his third year of service 
in said department, and $95 per month 
during his fourth year and all subse- 
quent years of service in department. 

Owing to Fire Chief Wright of San 
Antonio, Texas, having pointed out 
that every false alarm costs the city 
from $50 to $75. the City Council has 
offered a reward of $25 for the arrest 
and conviction of any person found 
guilty of turning in false alarms of 
fire, and has provided a $200 penalty. 

Last week, at Chicago, 59 indict- 
ments were returned by a special 
grand jury investigating the alii 

arson trust's operations. The line 

bills con lain 259 charges against fifty- 
six men. The grand jury made a 
special report asserting that half of 

the fires in Chicago were incendiary. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Seattle's Fire Marshal's Report. 

The following is the Fire Marshal's 
report to the City Council of Seattle 
for the month of February, 1913: 
Value of building involved, $214,350.00 

Of contents on same 635,667.00 

Total value of buildings and 

contents involved in fires 850,517.00 

Insurance on buildings 170,200.00 

On contents of same 392,850.00 

Total insurance on build- 
ings and contents 563,050.00 

Los on buildings 89,459.45 

On contents of same 234, 659. 48 

Total loss on buildings and 

contents 324,108.93 

Loss on Times Building 34,210.00 

Contents 114,841.33 

Total loss 149.051.33 

Loss on Denny Building 33,764.00 

Contents 69,984.97 

Total loss 103,748.97 

Total loss in fire in Times 

and Denny buildings 252,800.30 

Total loss in fire same night 
at First and Main (Feb. 12) 27,229.59 
Loss where fires started... 220,324.96 
On adjoining property 103,783,97 

Alarms from street boxes, 24; by 
telephone, 45; given at the stations, 13; 
second alarms. 2; special calls, 1; total 
number of alarms of all kinds, 85; 
false alarms, 6; needless alarms 2; 
smoke, not fire, 4; "no alarm" firesO; 
calls for special work, 1; fires with 
loss, 35; total number of fires, 65; 
fires caused by chimneys and flues, 20; 
by heating and cooking devices. 11; 
fires caused by matches and smoking, 
5: by incendiaries. 4; unknown 4; by 
rubbish, 3; grease, 3; gas, spontaneous 
ignition, rekindling, coal oil, electri- 
city and steam pipes, each 2; total 12: 
fires caused by gasoline, ashes and 
alcohol, each 1; total 3. 

Number of brick, stone or concrete 
buildings involved in fires, 4; frame. 
32; awnings, 1, no vessels, automo- 
biles or launches; fires originating in 
vacant buildings, 3; in street cars, 1; 
extending beyond first building, 2: 
brush and grass fires, eachl; confined 
to the floors on which they originated, 
14; fires resulting in total losses, 3. 

Number of inspections of manufac- 
turing plants. 10: business and hotel 
buildings, 10; theatres, schools, etc., 
1; apartment houses and dwellings. 



15; number of inspections of fires by 
Fire Marshal, special, 19. 

Harry W. Bringhurst, 
Fire Marshal. 

Oakland. 



Fire Horses Die of Broken Heart. 



The old armory at Twentieth street 
and Telegraph avenue, was destroyer' 
by fire early last Monday morning. 
The lower part was used as a garage 
by the Oakland Taxicab Company. 
Seven machines were burned. 

Policeman J. Keel saw the fire and 
rushed up stairs just in time to rescue 
L. Wilson, proprietor of a dance hall, 
and his family. Keel dragged them 
from the building and then fell, over- 
come by smok, but was reseued by 
firemen. The loss is estimated at 
$20,000. 

The Oakland Civil Service Commis- 
sion has recommended an amendment 
to the civil service rules permitting 
more promotions in the fire depart- 
ment. The recommendation is in line 
with the plan recently announced by 
the commission to secure further effi- 
ciency and raise the standard of the 
department. The amendment pro- 
vides for the promotion to lieutenants 
of drivers, tillermen, truckmen and 
hosemen of the third class; to engi- 
neers from stokers of the third grade; 
to captain from lieutenant; to super- 
intendent of engines or battalion 
chiefs from captains; to second assis- 
tant chief from battalion chiefs and 
captains, and to assistant chief from 
second assistant chiefs and battalion 
chiefs. 



The members of the new paid fire 
department at Med ford. Ore., are to 
have their salaries increased $5 a 
month, which will give the chief $90, 
assistant chief $80 and firemen $70. 

Rumors of trouble for some mem- 
bers of the San Diego Fire Depart- 
ment are frequent. It issaid that too 
great a fondness for grape and corn 
juice is at the bottom of the explosion 
that may take place any day. 

Bonds to the amount of $570,000 
were endorsed at the election last 
Saturday by the people of Berkeley. 
For a new sewer system $475,000 
1 will be spent, and $95,000 for improve- 
ment of the apparatus in use by the 
fire department. 



"Nig" and "Frank," a team of fire 
horses of North Pelham, N. Y., are 
dead from broken hearts. For over 
ten years they drew the apparatus. 
They seemed to take a keen delight in 
the excitement they experienced and 
caresses they received. 

Recently the fire commissioners pur- 
chased modern apparatus. Some days 
age the alarm rang, the horses pranced 
in their stalls, but were not used. 
Another alarm that night and still 
another the next day, but the old 
team remained in their stalls, and 
listened to the clanging gong. The 
next morning "Nig" was found dead 
in his stall. For two weeks "Frank" 
whinnied and at last refused to eat or 
drink, and had to be shot. 

Fire Commissioner Johnson of New 
York, who started the arson agitation 
in that city, has had bills introduced 
in the New York Legislature provid- 
ing that fire insurance policies shall 
he issued only on signed applications, 
giving a full description of the prop- 
erty and answering questions as to 
whether insurance has been refused 
and whether fires have occurred re- 
cently in the premises. Copies of the 
statement are to be forwarded to the 
lire Commissioner and State Fire 
Marshal. 

Now that Hayward is assured of a 
fire alarm system and a Alehouse, the 
Chamber of Commerce and other civic 
organizations will renew the agitation 
for a reduction in the present high in- 
surance rates, it is reported. 

At Sacramento, Apiil 1, bids were 
opened for tire alaim ap] stall s it r 
forty boxes and lour station house in- 
dicators toequip the recently ai.next d 
districts. 

The Salinas Fire Department will 
shortly purchase a $6,000 motor chemi- 
cal and 1500 feet of fire hose to add to 
the present apparatus. 

Anaheim proposes to huild a $3,000 
fire house and purchase a $6.(00 fire 
truck shortly. 



ROSENBLIMBRAHAM CO. Inc. 

TAILORS FOR A1EIS 

IIOS MARKET ST. 

ODD FELLOWS BUILDING 

Phone M.rkel 1503 

UNIFORMS OUR SPECIALTY UNION LABEL USE0 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

J. M. Barrie's four-act comedy, 
"The Admirable Crichton," is to be 
revived at the Alcazar Theatre next 
Monday evening and throughout the 
week, with Charles Waldron in the 
title role— a character that was the 
medium of his most emphatic hit when 
he last led Belasco & Mayer's players. 
In the cast with him are Madeleine 
Louis and the complete strength of 
the stock company. When he wrote 
this delicious fantasy the author of 
"Peter Pan" was in one of his best 
moods, the result being a charm that 
could only come from a master hand. 
Its theme is the influence of caste 
upon all classes of British society. By 
marooning a nobleman's family and 
servants on a tropical island the author 
causes a reversal of class distinctions, 
Crichton, the butler, proving that his 
inherited servility veneers the soul of 
a monarch. This interesting consid- 
eration of an inverted social state is 
conveyed through mirth- provoking 
situations and dialogue that reeks of 
keen satire. Mr. Waldron is at his 
best as Crichton. Miss Louis will be 
seen as Lady Mary Lazenby, the girl 
whose heart is lost and won on the is- 
land; Clara Beyers as Lady Catherine, 
Rhea Mitchell as Lady Agatha. Adele 
Belgarde as the Countess of Brockel- 
hurst, Edmond Lowe as her husband, 
Burt Wesner as the Earl of Loam, John 
A. Butler as the Hon. Ernest Woolley 
and Thos. Chatterton as the Rev. John 
Treherne, with the remainder of the 
company equally well bestowed. 

Empress Theatre. 

The headline attraction at the Em- 
press Theatre Sunday afternoon will 
be Al Lewis and the original company 
in "The New Leader," by the prolific 
writer Aaron Hoffman. A Sullivan 
& Considine European importation of 
note will be the nerve-tingling gym- 
nastic novelty, "The Aeroplane La- 
dies." a spectacular aerial perform- 
ance. A special feature is the return 
of the original rah rah boys, John 
Kenney and Frank Hollis with new 
rollicking songs, eccentric dances and 
curbstone confab. The syncopated 
appetites of local theatre goers will 
be appeased in the appearance of the 
Cabaret Trio, three of vaudeville's 
clever,. st entertainers in real "rag- 
time" songs and piano playing. Mar- 
velous is the only adjective which 
adequately describes the skill of Wil- 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to Jgr^ 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 





Sole Distributor for the Pacific Coast 



543 Oolden Oate Ave., San Francisco 



American Rubber Mfg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland. Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose. Brut* 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



Ham and Marion Wayte, who give an 
exhibition of boomerang, etc. Agnes 
Kayne, eccentric character come- 

! dienne, gives several character im- 
personations with appropriate songs, 
and Byrne and Ron ay have won 

j merited praise along the circuit with 
their dancing. Manager Sid Grauman 

j has arranged an attractive musical 
and dancing treat in a spectacular 
offering called "Twenty Minutes at 
The Chicken's Rail." This presenta- 
tion is elaborately staged with catchy 
music, late song hits, graceful danc- 
ing and several surprise conceptions. 
This attraction in addition to the re- 
gular bill makes up a strog show. 



THE 



Horn,- phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. RI/NIC Propmloi 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR l SPKCI 11 I ) 
>>06-«H oeary STREET 

Neat Bf.-lr,i. L 
TdephoM VM 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



TRIPP REMEDY COMPANY 

POSITIVELY CURES 

Blood Poison. Chronic Catarrh. Rheumatism, 

Goitre. Tumorous Growths, Malaria, 

Erysipelas, Scrofula. Lupus, 

Tuberbular-Glands. 

Joints and all Blood Diseases 

479 TURK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Pacific 




ireman 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

.IAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 
One year, in advance $2 00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on th.- most favorable terms, especially large and 

. onl miiertis "'"•■ . 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street; 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908, al Lhe 
PostorTtce at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Ac! 
Kress of March 3, 1879. 



Captain George Brown went to Sacramento 
Wednesday to look after the firemen's inter- 
ests in the Boyington Compensation Bill in 
behalf of the Scannell Club. 



A press dispatch say? seven persons were 
burned to death and fifteen others seriously 

injured in a fire which destroyed the He Wilson 
Hotel at Ma lone, N. Y., Thursday morning. 

The police department of this city con- 
tributed only $1,509.50 for the benefit of their 
brother officers in the recent flood and fire 
districts of Indiana and Ohio, while the fire- 
man of this department, to date, contributed 
$f,005 "A Tell it to Him con. 



Owing to the fact that a case was on trial 
invrudgeMurasky's Court Thursday morning, 
the hearing on thp petition of John R. Max- 
well to restrain the Civil Service Commission 
from holding competitive examinations for 
first and second pnerineers in the fire depart- 
ment was continued until Tuesday, April 22. 
This makes thp fourth continuance of the case. 



Thp old Central Theatre, at Market and 
Eighth streets, was completely destroyed by 
fire at an parly hour Wednesday morning. 
Th-- 1 efforts of the firemen were principally 
ieH to saving adjoining buildings. The 
blaze is believed to have been started by 
crossed electric wires. The loss was confined 
to the value of the lumber remaining in the 
old st ructure 



Chief Engineer Murphy, speaking of the 
demonstration of the American-La France 
'1 riven combination chemical eniritfe 
and ho*e wagon, held last Sunday in theEfun- 
sel district, stated the people as a whole were 
well pleased with the demonstration, He 
ulsn «ta*ed he is desirous of furnishing the 
r*"sidMnts of the district wilh adequate fire 
[irotttcLion in the way of modern apparatus. 

Two of the American- La France motor com- 
bination wagons for lhe San Francisco Fire 
Department left the factory at Elmira, N. Y., 
the 5th inst. The third of these combination 
wagons"^ al*o a combination wagon for the 
to vn nf Hillsborough, left the Elmira factory 
on the 9th A :cnrdiiig ly, San Francisco will 
within the near future have a substantial ad 



dition to her motor fire apparatus equipment. 
The two American-La France motor chemical 
engines for the San Francisco department 
will be shipped within a few days. 

Test of a Motor Chemical Engine. 

Sunday last, under the direction of Chief 
Engineer Murphy and Superintendent of En- 
gines Bermingham, a working demonstration 
of the utility and practicability of motor fire 
apparatus was given for the information of 
the residents of the Sunset district, with par- 
ticular reference to the higher levels in the 
Forest Hill section at the upper end of Ninth 
av-nue. An Amprican-La France Type 1". 
four-cylinder, 70-horsepower single 40-gallon 
combination chemical engine and hose wagon 
was used for the demonstration. Starting 
from the quarters of engine company 22, 
Tenth avenue, the apparatus, fully loaded as 
for service, with lhe chemical tank charged 
and the usual complement of men and service 
equipment, made the run to the upper end of 
Ninth avenue in the commendable time of 
1 minute 45 seconds. A test fire had been 
started at a point near the end of the run, 
and Chief Murphy had the alarm sent in to 
the company by phone. The regular equip- 
ment of horse-drawn apparatus and men left 
quarters at the same time as the motor appa- 
ratus, and the time required by them for the 
lone, hard up-hill climb was 10 minutes, 
showing a difference of 8 minutes 15 seconds 
in favor of the motor apparatus. The de- 
monstration was an unqualified success, and 
the possibilities and the additional protection 
that will evidently be afforded by this class 
of apparatus in the high levels seemed to be ' 
pleasing to the large gathering of residents 
and property owners that was on hand. 

Full Company of Lady Firemen. 

Speaking of suffragettes and votes for 
women, R. S. Chapman of the American- 
La France Company claims the unique dis- 
tinction of having introduced into the San 
Francisco Fire Department the innovation of 
a full company of lady firemen. The Ameri- 
can-La France motor apparatus \'<<r the de- 
monstration in the Sunset district Sunday last 
came on the ground loaded brim full of lady 
voters as the guests of Mrs. Chapman, Mrs. 
Altizer and Mrs. Waight, all wives of 
representatives of the American-La France 
( lompany. 

Arriving at the quarters of engine 22, the 
ladies were (Vrsl shown through the house and 
given their first lesson in engine house do- 
mestics by the courteous members of the 
company All expressed unbounded admira- 
tion for the Spick and span neatness and the 

tasty arrangement of everything connected 
wilh the place. At first some were inclined 
to think that special i -reparations had been 
made in contemplation of their visit, but such 

was not the case. The concensus of" opinion 
seemed to be re presei 1 1 eil by the remark of 
one nf the ladies to lhe effect thai if she were 
nol already married, membership in the fire 
departmenl would be given serious considers: 
tion as being one of the desirable attributes 



of a good husband. 

At the conclusion of the demonstration at 
the top of the hill, after the company had 
"taken up," the ladies were loaded in the 
apparatus on top of the hose and sent back to 
quarters in the regular conventional fashion. 

The Scannell Club. 



We are pleased to announce the birth of the 
Scannell Club. It appears to be a very lusty 
youngster for its age. With an enrollment of 
six hundred and forty-eight members from 
among the fire laddies and a few civilians who 
have in the past proved their unselfish interest 
in the affairs of the fire department, this or- 
ganization has had a most auspicious beginn- 
ing. That day is not far distant when every 
member of the fire department will realize 
that his welfare and rights will be best safe- 
guarded by joining this club. 

With united and concerted action on the 
part of all the firemen much may be accom- 
plished tending to make their vocations less 
onerous. Spasmodic efforts on the part of a 
few will not result in any permanent benefit. 

The Dauntless Club of Buffalo; the Helmet 
Club of Chicago; the Russell Club of Boston 
and the Firemen's Mutual Aid Association of 
New York — all of these organizations have 
been instrumental in bettering the working 
conditions of their members. We hope that 
the existence of the Scannell Club may have 
a similar effect in this city. 

The Best Obtainable. 



Ashland, Oregon, has recently contracted 
for an American-La France motor combina- 
tion wagon. This is the result of months of 
investigation by the Ashland authorities. 
Everything available in the field of motor fire 
apparatus was considered. An official repre- 
sentative of the city of Ashland recently 
visited San Francisco and neighboring points 
in tins connection. He studied this class of 
apparatus in service in San Francisco, Oak- 
land and other places and was given a num- 
ber of practical demonstrations. Along with 
the rest he visited the simp at San Anselmo, 
wh< re a commercial truck chassis is under- 
going transformation into a motor ci n 
tion wagon for another town in the stale of 
Oregon; His official report on his return to 
Ashland was an unqualified endorsement of 
the American-La France as being the best 
obtainable motor fire apparatus. 

Department Heads to Try Employes. 

At the regular Monday night meeting of the 
Civil Service Commission, under the authority 
of Amendment No. 3, they drafted and put 
into effect rule 23, which concerns trials, dis- 
missals and appeals. Under the new i 
all trials of civil service employes will be held 
i,\ the heads of the departments, and if the 
deft i dan! is not satisfied with the verdict he 
ma> appeal. to the Civil Service Commission 
for a review of the testimony. Heretofore 
all trials were held by the t ivil Service Com- 
mission. 

Under the new amendment the con mission 
is als.. authorized to review all ra\ rolls of the 
city, and they must receive that body's ap- 
proval before they can become effective. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Firemen Aid Families of Firemen. 

The following is a list of contributions con- 
tributed by the members and employes of the 
San Francisco Fire Department to date for 
the benefit of the families of firemen who 
were sufferers from fire and flood in Ohio and 
Indiana: 

Engine Company No. 22 $47.00 

" 23 47.00 

" 2 43.90 

" 13 43.40 

" 6 42.70 

" 39 42.50 

" 4 41.35 

" 29 40.45 

" 30 36.50 

" 12 35.75 

" 3 3500 

" 16 34.50 

" 17 34.15 

" 5 34.00 

" 35 32.75 

" 43 32.00 

" 36 26 50 

" 19 25.00 

" 9 25.00 

" 14 24.50 

" 15 24.50 

" 28 24.50 

" 45 24.50 

" 31 24.00 

" 7 23.50 

" 41 23.50 

" 21 23.00 

" 1 2200 

" 42 21.50 

" 24 21.00 

" 25 20.00 

" 27 19.50 

" II 18.25 

" 26 1650 

" 33 1600 

" 34 16.00 

" 20 15 50 

" 37 15.50 

•• 32 14.00 

" 40 13.50 

" 8 12.00 

" 38 12.00 

" 18 11.00 

" 44 11.00 

" 10 1000 

Truck Company No. 10 50.00 

" 8 47.75 

" 12 39.00 

*' 6 29.50 

" 1 2900 

" 9 28.50 

" 7 2500 

" II 2450 

" 2 22.00 

" 3 20.00 

" 4 19.50 

" 5 17.00 

Chem. Company No. 5 18.00 

" 10 18.00 

" 8 17.75 

" 3 1755 

" 7 17.00 

" 6 1500 

" 1 12.00 



" 2 11.00 

" 4 10.50 

" 12 10.00 

•' II 9.50 

" 9 8.50 

Fire Boat . . No. 2 78.25 

" 1 42.00 

Water Tower " 2 17.75 

1 11.75 

Water Battery No. 3 7.50 

Corporation Yard 84.00 

Battalion Chief J. Britt 7.50 

Mr. Al. Leaf 5 00 

Office Employes 12.50 

Stable " 43.50 

Department of Electricity 00 00 

Hydrantman J. Winn 2.50 

Total $2005.50 

Geo. F. Brown, Secretary. 

Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

We take the following excerpts from the 
Administrative Committee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

The Mayor notified the Board that he is 
making an investigation of the controversy 
between the Fire Board and the Civil Service 
Commission. 

L. Carney, of truck 5, who was suspended 
for addressing Chief Murphy in an insolent 
manner over the phone. After finding the 
action of Carney was unintentional, he was 
restored to duty without loss of pay. 

Battalion Chief Radford submitted a com- 
plaint against Gabriel Cuneo of engine 10 for 
failing to report back to his company at the 
expiration of his meal hour, April 9. De- 
prived of one day's pay. 

In the matter of Jos. Finn, engineer engine 
22, asking that records be changed so as to 
allow him credit for time of service since 
Jan. 5, 1892, the date that he originally en- 
tered the service, instead of Dec. 23, 1893, as 
now shown on the records. Request granted. 

The following transfers were granted to 
take effect on the 16th inst. : F. J. Hughes, 
from hoseman engine 41 to engine 23; John 
Breen, from hoseman engine 23 to engine 26. 

Acting Battalion Chief Sewell submitted a 
complaint against L. Wolters, engine, 22, for 
failing to respond to an alarm with his com- 
pany on April 12. Wolters stated he failed 
to hear the bell, being fast asleep, and that 
his case being the only one in 16 years, he was 
only reprimanded. 

From Lieut. Holmes of engine 4, asking 
that he be allowed salary for the month of 
February, amounting to $18.25 for time off 
duty while under suspension for violation of 
the rules. Allowed salary for all the motith 
of February with the exception of 14' davs 
that hi- was deprived of pay for a violation of 
the rules. 

Chief Murphy submitted a complaint 
against Ward Miller, hostler at the depart- 
ment stablee, for violating the traffic ordi- 
nance while driving the department hay 
wagon, and stilting he had reprimanded him. 

Watchman H. K. Iburg. :ii the rnrporatien 
yard, was allowed the privilege of living in 
Marin county on his days off during the sum- 



mer months. 

Chief Murphy submitted a copy of the rules 
to govern the annual vacations for the pres- 
eut year, and recommended that they be for- 
warded to the different companies of the de- 
partment. 

Captain Lawson of engine 6 was granted a 
leave of absence for ten days from the 16th 
inst., with permission to leave the city, on 
account of sickness. 

Machinist Delany, at the corporation yard, 
was granted a leave of absence for a couple 
of weeks, with permission to leave the city, 
on account of sickness. 

Carriage Painter David McKibben, at the 
corporation yard, was allowed salary for two 
days absent from duty during the month of 
December, 1912, on account of sickness, 
alleged to have been contracted while work- 
ing at the corporation yard. In connection 
with this matter it was further recommended 
that no further claims for salary during sick- 
ness contracted prior to this date by employes 
of the corporation yard, whose salaries is fixed 
upon a per diem basis shall be considered. 

Superintendent of Engines, Sam Berming- 
ham, submitted a report upon the cost of 
coal used in the department, which was filed. 

Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

In the matter of the report of President 
Hammer on the resignation of Robt. H. Lock- 
year, engineer in this department, under the 
rule of the Civil Service Commission, the 
secretary was instructed to write a letter to 
the Civil Service Commission that the Fire 
Board has no real objection. 

In the matter of the extension of the Webb 
Motor Fire Apparatus Company until May 
20 on its contract for motor-driven chemical, 
the same was referred to President Hammer, 
with full power to act. 

The matter of reprimanding D. O'Donnell 
of truck 5, for assaulting Thomas Timmons 
of that company on March 17, is to be recon- 
sidered. 

Dennis J. Roche, certified by the Civil Ser- 
vice Commission from the eligible list for ap- 
pointment as hoseman, was approved. 

Resolution requesting temporary appoint- 
ments for the month of May, 1913, where 
there are no civil service eligibles available. 
Approved. 

Resolution temporarily appointing John R. 
Maxwell to the position of lirst assistant 
chief engineer, and .lames R. Layden to tin- 
position of second assistant engineer. Bran- 
denstein and Hammer "aye," Pfaeffle and 
Dillon "no." Lost. 

For Flowers for all occasions call up Mission 
50M*. J. J. O'Connor, 275(> Mission Street. 



TVMk**- DoubUu 1255 

U. J. BORCK, THE TAILOR 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

FIREMEN'S '.' UNIFORMS 
ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 

93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



o 



American -La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
660 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



Phone Merrill 4447 



H. G. WILLIAMS 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boqtiets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given t<> Wadding «»</ Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs, 

Gardening, Etc. 

Telephone mission 1553 

I •> Kkach NURSBKIBS, take Gaetra street car to 28rd, 01 

Kitasion, 24 th street and Huffman avenue car 

to I >'.uulass and 24th streets. 



Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



u h „ A DoubU. 4934 
>>""( Home C 2642 



Phones 



I We.i . 586 
• HomcS 3174 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 

128 POST ST. 21 10-21 14 FILLMORE ST. 



NA/M. F. EGAN 

II. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURUEON TO S. P. F. D. 



1155 GULDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



Phone Douslu 4716 



Home C 2458 



717 K Sired 

Sacramento"' 



112 S. Spring Si. 
Los Angeles 

EAGLESON & CO. 

Importer* and Manufacturers 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1118 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 



LAMANETBROS 

HATS. UNDERWEAR, KTC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Genls' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Dou,la. 287 I Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 



Phone Market 5417 



630 KEARNY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO. 



THE best attention and service for the man who car- 
ries a HOWARD Watch not on account of the 
watch, but because he is likely to be that kind 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does sue*- 

Kesl a man who appreciate* quality and is quite able to 
know whether he is gettinf ii or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Pind the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is ;i good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
or it. 

Th. price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and ;i printed ticket attached— from the 
17-jeweI (double roller i In a Crescent Extra or 
Bi ■ Extra gold-filled case at $40, to the 23- 
jewel at $150 and the Edward Howard model 

Admiral Slgsbee has written a little ' k, 

■•The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record ol his own Howard in the i " ri, Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Depl N, 
.md we'll send you a copy. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mati 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AIND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCfrCO 

We Do Artistic 

Job Printing 




VOL. X.-NO. 23 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Firemen Are to Study and Exercise. 

It is reported from Dallas, Tex., that 
Fire and Police Commission Louis 
Blaylock at an early meeting of the 
board of commissioners will advocate 
the adoption of a plan for the physical 
and mental development of members 
of the Dallas Fire Department. 

The first recommendation of the 
commissioner will be that of punching 
bags, boxing gloves, horizontal bars, 
trapez swings, muscle r'evelopers and 
all sorts of gymnasium equipment be 
installed at every fire station. Setting 
up exercises will be held every morn- 
ing under the direction of the captains 
and lieutenants in charge and the use 
of the gymnasium will be compulsory. 

Mental exereise on the part of the 
firemen will be optional and not com- 
pulsory. A fixed set of educational 
reading including some lighter vol- 
umes of fiction and history will be 
compiled by the commissioner, who 
will seek advice from educators of 
Dillas. Examinations will be held 
regularly in order to determine the 
results of the men's studies and pro- 
motions will be based to a certain 
extent, on mental qualifications of the 
men. 

Besides the ruling regarding exer- 
cise on the part of the Dallas firemen. 
Commissioner Blaylock is contemplat- 
ing several drastic changes in the de- 
partment. 

''The city should provide beds and 
mattresses for the firemen," the com- 
missioner says. "The beds at all the 
stations are an eye-sore. While they 
are clean, they vary in size and in 
height. 1 am going to recommend the 



purchase of uniform bedsteads and 
mattresses for installation in the va- 
rious stations." 

Another thing which isbeing studied 
by Commissioner Blaylock is for the 
city to pass an appropriation for the 
purchase of uniforms for the firemen. 
Probably the amount suggested will 
be $45 a year per man. This system 
of purchasing uniforms is general in 
fire departments. 

Chief Building Inspector Horgan of 
this city stated last week that on April 
24 a crew of workmen under his direc- 
tion will begin the removal, at the 
owners' expense, of all frame shacks 
within the fire limits. Horgan says 
that there are 240 shack buildings re- 
maining out of the 1800 which for- 
merly stood in the fire limits. 

At Philadelphia, April 18, three 
firemen were killed and a dozen others 
seriously, some probably fatally, in- 
jured, when they were buried beneath 
a falling wall at a fire which destroyed 
the five-story candy factory of W. T. 
Westcott, near the center of the city, 
The dead men are Walter Costello, 
Henry King and Chas. Moritz. 

At Oakland, April 19, fire which 
caused $4000 loss to the Nippon Ba- 
zaar, 921 Washington street, cost Sam 
McKay $20,000 in good securities and 
hard cash, according to the story he 
told the police. 

At a recent meeting of the Fire 
Commissioners of San Francisco, an 
order was issued directingall employes 
of the pumping stations of the high 
pressure system to wear the regula- 

I inn nil forms of I lie department. 



Sacramento's $300,000 Blaze. 

A disastrous fire, which started in 
the Knox Lumber Company, Second 
and M streets, Sacramento, swept the 
lower portion of the business district 
early last Monday morning and en- 
tailed a loss of $300,000. The blaze, 
fanned by a stiff south wind, soon 
spread to the adjoining lumber yards 
of Friend & Terry, and the two lum- 
ber plants were completely gutted 
before the fire department could re- 
spond to a general alarm. Huge (lam- 
ing sparks were scattered broadcast 
by the wind and at 4 o'clock the en- 
tire block bounded by Front and Sec- 
ond and L and M streets was in flames. 
The block destroyed by the fire was 
occupied by a number of warehouses. 

For awhile the sheds and freight 
warehouses of the Southern Pacific 
Company were in grave danger of 
total destruction and the officials of 
this company summoned hundreds of 
men to assist in soaking the endan- 
gered sheds and surrounding property 
with water. 

Shortly after 4 o'clock the ware- 
house of the John Brunei- Furniture 
Company caught fire and despite the 
fact that the building is of brick with 
metal doors and shutters, the flames 
swept throughout the structure. A 
number of the buildings consumed 
were of brick anil metal, but were 
gutted because of the lack of men to 
Bght the tire. 

Hundreds of persons were forC( d to 
flee in scanty attire from adjacent 
lodging houses and hotel, but so tai- 
ns known but one man, Martin Say, 
sustained injury. Shay, a lodger, 
suffered a broken hip in attempting 
to escape from a burning apartment. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Meeting of Veteran Firemen. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Veteran Firemen's Association was 
held at headquarters, 368 Fell street. 
There was present a full corps of 
officers, the directors and a large num- 
ber of the members present. The 
routine business was rapidly disposed 
of. Bills to the amount of $90. 95 were 
ordered paid and the receipts of the 
evening was $197. Two members 
were suspended for non-payment of 
dues and the names of two members 
were sticken off the rolls for like rea- 
son. Comrades Bell, Mooney, Mc- 
Adoo, Farrell and Sheehan reported 
still sick. The deaths of Comrades 
J. B. Lawrence and Thomas Mahoney 
was recorded. Directors McDowell 
and Winter resigned as directors; the 
vacancies will be filled at the next 
meeting of the Board of Directors. 
The Picnic Committee reported that 
they had secured Schutzen Park for 
Sunday, May 25th, 1913; that they 
had secured a good union band of 24 
pieces, with an assurance of the latest 
and best music, and that the program 
would far eclipse all previous ones. 
Several amendments to the laws were 
submitted, but were not adopted — one 
in particular was adopted, that was to 
increase the death benefit from $75 to 
$100, but owing to a slight technicality 
it will require another meeting to de- 
termine whether it becomes operative. 
The business being concluded, whist 
was indulged in and refreshments 
was served during the evening. 

Infirmary Fire Terrorizes 600 Inmates. 

A San Leandro dispatch of April 19 
says a fire in the building occupied by 
the heating plant and laundry house 
at the County Infirmary shortly be- 
fore midnight, caused terror among 
600 patients, all of whom were taken 
out of the various wards by the nurses. 

Those in most danger were thirty- 
two incurables in the building imme- 
diately adjoining the burning struc- 
ture. They were in danger of being 
overc »me by smoke and heat, hut 
were rescued. 

Wiifii it was seen that the fire had 
gained great headway, all efi'oris to 
save th ■ buildingwere abandoned and 
the efforts of the firefighters were 
tarned to keeping the flames from 



spreading to other buildings. The 
main building was saved with a stream 
of water turned on the side of the 
building nearest the heating plant. 
More than 100 patients were carried 
from this building. 

In half an hour the fire had burned 
itself out. The loss was $15,000. 

The San Leandro Fire Department 
responded to the alarm, but before 
they arrived the patients had been re- 
moved under the direction of Superin- 
tendent C. A. Wills, Storekeeper A. 
Shedd and five nurses. 

The fire is believed to have started 
from crossed electric wires. New 
machinery for the heating plant had 
but recently been installed. The build- 
ing was a complete loss. 

Fire Destroyes Three Homes. 

Early last Saturday morning, Arril 
19, fire starting in a cottage at 617 
Rhode Island street, this city, de- 
stroyed three small houses, causing 
more than $5,000 damage and drove 
the three families into the street. 
The origin is not known, though 
crossed wires are believed responsible. 
The house at 617 Rhode Island street 
was occupied by George A. Shepper 
and his family; a cottage at 615 Rhode 
Island by the family of T. J. Mechell, 
and the house at 619 Rhode Island by 
T. Garlish. 

The three families were forced to 
run out in their night clothing and 
little was saved. 



A Scholarly Fire Horse. 

The firemen of engine house 2, Potts- 
town, Pa., have a horse whose name 
is Tom and who is only 13 years old, 
;but who could pass a high school ex- 
amination, according to Captain Wm. 
Roof, his driver and professor, and 
the other men of No. 2. 

Tom was interviewed recently by a 
newspaper reporter and his first 
"stunt" was to court tie spots en a 
playing card, which he did by tapping 
off the number with his hoof. Cap- 
tain Roof then engaged his charge in 
the following conversation: 

"Did you make a run this morning, 
Tom ?" 

"Yps." nodded the horse. 

"What number came in ?" 

"Forty-three." answered the big 
white beauty (tapping four times, 



pausing, and then tapping three more.) 

"How many horses in the building, 
Tom ?" 

"One, two, three," tapped Tom. 

"Then you're not a horse ?" 

"Nix," nodded the big animal. 

"You're just like the chief and me?" 

"Yep," nodded Tom, with a grin. 
And he followed this information by 
saying he was German. 

Picking up a newspaper, Captain 
Roof asked Thomas if it was a New 
York, Pittsburg, Latrobe, Cleveland 
or Philadelphia paper, naming over a 
long list of cities and towns, but Tom 
nodded "no." 

"Is it a Johnstown paper?" asked 
the captain. 

"Yep," nodded the animal. 

Tom said it was a copy of The 
Democrat, and showed how he knew, 
by pointing out the heading. He also 
tapped out the date of the edition. 

Tom then picked out Chief Keller 
from the bystanders, tapped out how 
many strangers were piesent and 
finished his demonstration with a dip 
into mathematics. 

In a wise manner the big fr.inj.l 
tapped out three rows of figure s w hit b 
Captain Roof had written on a black- 
board. Then without hesitation le 
added up the columns, and once 
showed his displeasure when tie 
captain put the total of a column on 

the wrong side. 



Tuesday, April 15. at a joint meet- 
ing of the Fire Boai d with Trustees 
Eva and McCormick of San Mateo, an 
ordinance was a] proved to n quire all 
buildings of more than two stories to 
be provided with fire escapes. A state 
law to this efft ft alr< ady exists. 1 he 
San Mateo Park Fire Compary wrs 
admitted to membership in tie Pcaid 
with Oscar Boldemann as fori n an. 



While assisting in rescuing seven 
horses ard a colt from a 1 in rii g 1 ; i n 
in Oakland Sundry evfrnrg. Cspts>'n 
Agnew and Inspector Hidl-iif — lie 
former was kicked in the ale'emen, 
while the latter had his 1 n d c < \ erely 
burned when the mof of the rrrn 
collapsed. Both officers weie t;len 
to the receiving hospital for treatment. 



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PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

"The Woman," one of David Be- 
lasco's latest successes, is to be given 
its first presentation in a stock theatre 
next Monday evening and throughout 
the week at the Alcazar, with Chas. 
Waldron leading a carefully-chosen 
cast. No recently-launched play bear- 
ing the Belasco trade-mark has been 
received with more popular enthu- 
siasm than this stirring exposition of 
political life in the national capital, as 
is attested by the fact that it ran a 
year on Broadway, six months in Chi- 
cago and a season on tour. Written 
by Wm. C. de Mille, "The Woman" 
fairly reeks of Belasco's incomparable 
stagecraft. All the action is laid in a 
Washington hotel, and much of it 
hinges on the refusal of the girl who 
presides at the telephone switchboard 
to expose a secret which means the 
making or breaking of a political 
leader and the preservation or ruin of 
a woman's good name. From start to 
finish the play is intensely gripping, 
the endeavorof the ringsters to break 
the girl's fortitude being one of the 
nrost powerful scenes ever staged. 
Mr. Waldron will be seen as Congress- 
man Mark Robertson of New York; 
Louis Bennison as Congressman "Jim" 
Blake, Edmond Lowe as his son, Ker- 
nan Cripp; (specially engaged) as 
Congressman Matthew Standish, Burt 
Wesner as Attorney Van Dyke, Roy 
Clement as Congressman Silas Gregg 
of Kansas, Thos. Chatterton as Con- 
gressman "Tim" Noligan of Pennsyl- 
vania, Rhea Mitchell as the telephone 
girl and Clara Beyers as the woman 
in the case. 

Empres6 Theatre. 

"My Lady's Fans," an art posing 
invention which serves to depict fa- 
mous fan paintings from the brush of 
Julian Dove, a celebrated Parisian 
artist, who has made a specialty of 
fan decorative work for society folk 
will be the headline attraction at the 
E n >-.•;; Sunday afternoon. The La 
Vine-Cimeron Trio will offer a tra- 
vesty of physical culture entitled 
"Imagination." Miss Marie Russell, 
who styles herself "The Belle of 
Kentucky," is the best impersonator 
of the dark brown variety of negro in 
vaudeville. Valentine Vox, Jr., vau- 
deville's artistic ventriloquist who 



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made a big impression on his forme r THE 

visit will comede himself into popu- 
lar favor with the aid of his wooden 

dummy. A nervy and at the same JRIPP REMEDY COMPANY 
time funny athletic act called "Fun 
on the Revolving Ladder," is another 

attraction that will elicit praise. Thej positively cures 

Pla Trio of operatic singers, all pos-l 
SeSSlJlg good voices, promise a musical Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh, Rheumatism, 

treat with a selected repertoire of 
classic and popular numbers. Camp- 
bell and Reno in a comedy-dramatic 
sketch entitled "A Rural School- 
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PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2 00 

Six months ■ LOO 

ADVERTISEMENTS 
Inserted on the mnst favorable terms, especially larpre and 
continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Tele phone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-ckiss matter March 21, 1908. at the 
Postnffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
Cress of March 3. 1879. 

Senator Finn's bill providing that theState 
shall pay one half the maintenance of the San 
Francisco fireboats David Scannell and Dennis 
Sullivan has passed the Senate unanimously. 
It has the approval of the Board of Control. 

At last week's meeting of the Fire Board 
Mayor Rolph submitted a copy of an article 
published in one of the daily papers relative 
to bills for coal furnished this department by 
the Western Fuel Co. being held up by the 
Auditor and requesting that he be furnished 
with an explanation of the same. It was 
recommended that Chief Murphy submit a 
report to the Board on this matter. 

Edmonton, Alberta, has recently ordered 
two American-La France motor combination 
wagons. Nanaimo has also contracted for 
two pieces of the same apparatus. These 
sales, in conjunction with three of the same 
cars placed at Vancouver and one at Point 
Grey a few months ago, show a flattering re- 
cognition of American- La France merits in the 
British northwest. This is doubly significant 
in view of the fact that sales of American 
goods in that country are subject to a duty 
of 35 per cent. 

In the temporary appointments of John R. 
Maxwell and James Layden as acting assis- 
tant engineers last week by the Fire Board, 
Commissioner Brand en stein stated the men 
discharged their duties in conformity with 
Civil Service rules and questioned the right 
of the Civil Service Commission in withhold- 
ing salary tor sciri temporary appointments. 
Commissioner Dillon suggested that the sec- 
retary be instructed to write a communication 
to the Civil Service Commission, asking that 
they empower the Fire Board to make tem- 
porary appointments for first and second 
assistant engineers, but being opposed by 
Commissioner Bran den stein. 

Chief of Police White Thursday suspended 
the following members of his force, charged 
with "standing in" atid receiving bribes for 
protection of bunco men of this city: Frank 
Esola, former detective and now patrolman; 
Charles Taylor, former detective and now 
patrolman; Arthur MacPhee, detective ser- 
geant; James McGowan, detective sergeant ; 
Jack Sullivan, former detective and now 



patrolman; W. F. McHugh, former detective 
and now patrolman; Charles Josephs, patrol- 
man, and Louis Droulette, former detective 
and now patrolman. The charges are to be 
investigated by the Grand Jury. The sus- 
pended officers claim there is no truth in the 
charges. 

Argues for Physical Test Examination. 

John T. Williams, attorney for Acting As- 
sistant Chief Engineer Maxwell, who has 
petitioned the Court to restrain the Civil 
Service Commission from holding a com- 
petitive examination, painted a verbally glow- 
ing picture of sturdy firefighters dashing up 
ladders, with axe in hand, battering burning 
timbers and leading his men to thrilling 
victories over the fiery flames, in Judge 
Murasky's Court Wednesday. 

The Daily News, referring to Williams' 
argument, contained the following, from 
which we quote: 

"As Williams warmed up to his subject he 
looked as does a fire chief leading a forlorn 
hope, rescuing persons in a burning hotel. 

"He exhorted the court to rule so that all 
of the firemen of San Francisco, from the 
man in the ranks to the chief, will be of the 
absolutely sound physical type that can fight 
on and on and on, till the last ember is out 
and the last person rescued." 

The same paper says the examination does 
not call for a physical test, but Maxwell in- 
sists that this is a violation of the charter. 



Fifty Seagraves in California. 

The city of Salinas very recently purchased 
a Seagrave combination chemical and hose 
wagon. The Gorham Fire Apparatus C< m- 
pany are proud of the fact that this order 
makes the 50th sale of Seagraves in Califor- 
nia, with the nearest competitor having se- 
cured about one-fifth that volume of business. 
This does not include theGorham, or Seagrave 
pumping engines, of which there are 14 in 
California, with the nearest rival having two. 

Contrasts in St. Louis. 



High Salaries Means More Efficiency. 

From various parts of the country come the 
intelligence that members of fire departments 
are receiving or are going to receive increased 
salaries. This is a good sign and will natur- 
ally result in improvement in the efficiency 
wherever it occurs. Increase in salary has 
been in vogue in various other city depart- 
ments, and there is no reason why the fire 
department should be made an exception to 
the rule. The increased cost of living is gen- 
eral, and to single out the members of the 
fire department as those to be exempt from 
such beneficiaries, shows a lack of apprecia- 
tion of the most important of city servants. 

The increases vary all the way from ten to 
twenty per cent, and it is worthy of note that 
while the chiefs have been the principal actors 
in making this request, they have invariably 
left themselves out of the question. In other 
words, the chiefs have been looking after the 
interests of their subordinates without regard 
to their own. 

It stands to reason that the higher the 
salary the more earnestness and more interest 
will be shown in the service rendered by the 
fire department members, as it has the ten- 
dency to cause firemen to look upon the posi- 
tion with permanency, rather than one to 
afford them a living until they can obtain a 
position of larger income. 

Fireman J. J. Gillespie died a hero's death 
in the collapse of two stores at 140 and 142 
Whitehall street, Atlanta, Ga., last week. 
He had rescued six women from a part of the 
structure. 



In St. Louis it would seem that the mem- 
bers of every class of city employes are bet- 
ter paid than the firemen. These are on duly 
for twenty-four hours every day — except one 
in every six, which is the fireman's day off. 
Of the 24 hours he is allowed only three hours 
for his meals and a peep at his family. His 
salary, with time taken off for meals and his 
off day, is only a small fraction over 17 cents 
an hour, as against that of the average water 
works employe, with a salary of $80 per 
month — a small fraction over33cents an hour 
for an eight-hour day. The contrast is at 
least suggestive — all the more so when the 
discomforts and dangers of a fireman's lile 
are weighed in the balance against the safety 
and ease that accompany that of the water 
works employe. 

A New Hose Holder. 

A practical tool in tire fighting will soon 
win the favor of firemen. This is what the 
Sullivan Hose Holder has done. In the>e 
days of high pressure with large and powerful 
hose streams herculean strength is required 
to hold the nozzle. In fact, two men cannot 
guide a stream absolutely steady without 
other aid, and nothing has been devised that 
will assist the firemen to the extent that the 
Sullivan Hose Holder will. It doesn't matter 
where the pipeman has to go, this tool can 
be used with excellent effect. It is just the 
thing for ladder work. It is not a cumber- 
some tool and can therefore be handled with 
ease. Fire departments that have one of 
these tools commend it highly, and say they 
would not dispense with it. 

Oakland. 

The contention that any municipal employe, 
retired for disability before the legal age, 
may, if he recovers, resume his rank, though 
someone may have been appointed in his 
place, will probably be taken into court. 
City Attorney Ben F. Woolnet and Harrison 
S. Robinson President of the Civil Service 
Board, and one of the framers of the charier, 
take opposite views. The dhbgrttment has 
arisen over the appointment of a successor to 
George Macdonald, retired first assistant fire 
chief. 

The proposed bill establishing a Califorria 
; Civil Service School for training city, country 
and state officials, has been endoned by ihe 
Oakland Chamber of Commerce. II at brdy 
has asked the Alameda County legislative 
delegation to support the measure. Tele- 
grams have also been sent to chambers of 
commerce throughout the state, atking sup- 
port. The bill provides for the a( I ropriation 
of $40,000 by the state for the establishment 
of a training school, directed by experts in 
civil government, in which governmental 
employes may receive, free, practical in- 
struction. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

We take the following excerpts from the 
Administrative Committee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From the Assistant Secretary to the Mayor, 
calling attention to the urgent need of in- 
stalling a motor driven chemical company in 
the Ingleside district. Taken under advise- 
ment and the chief engineer directed to make 
suitable reply thereto. 

From the Board of Supervisors, submitting 
a copy of a resolution adopted relative to the 
identification signatures on municipal pay 
checks. Filed. 

From Battalion Chief Cook, submitting a 
report of the meritorious conduct of George 
Murray, hoseman fireboat 2, in rescuing a 
man from the waters of the bay on the 15th 
inst. Referred to the Committee for the In- 
vestigation of Acts of Valor for investigation 
and report. 

From Battalion Chief Bailey, submitting a 
complaint against J. Woods, truckman truck 
5, for failing to report to his company for 
duty at the expiration of a leave of absence 
on the 14th inst. Woods appeared before the 
committee and pleaded guilty to said com- 
plaint, and your committee recommend that 
he be deprived of pay during the time of his 
suspension. 

From Wm. Jeffers, lieutenant engine 20, 
requesting that he be granted an extension 
of his leave of absence with permission to 
absent himself from the city, on account of 
sickness. Granted for one month from date. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the Board of Public Works be requested 
to have a hose rack built at the quarters of 
fireboat 1, for the purpose of drying out. the' 
Si inch hose used by that company. Approved. 

From the chief engineer, submitting a copy 
of an ordtr to be issued to engineer of engine i 
companies relalive to the blowing out of the 
boiler tubes of their steam lire engines. 
Approved. 

From Jos Wales, driver engine 42, request- 
ing a leave of absence for two weeks, with 
permission to leave the city, on account of 
sickness. Granted. 

Prom W. T. Steinmelz, Chief Alameda Fire 
Department, submitting the names of his fir.-i 
and second assistant chief engineers, whom 
lie authorized to request (lie services of the! 
lireloais in case of lire on (he Alameda water 
front. Filed and the chief engineer directed 
to forward copies of the same to the chief of 

the Department of Electricity and officers Of j 
the department having control of said boats, j 

Your committee recommend the following! 
amendment to the roll's and regulations of j 
i to- depart menl : 

lim.K 27, Ski-. I!> Whenever any member] 
or employe of the fire department hhall have 

I It "If duly on sick leave with pay for a 

continuous period of three mom lis, he shall, at 
i lie expiration of such period of three months 
appear in person, or by representation, before 
the Hoard of Fire Commissioners for the pur- 
pose of due ami proper investigation of the 
nature of bis disability, and i i' it shall appear 



to the satisfaction of the Board that his dis- 
ability is due to some injury sustained or ex- 
posure suffered in the discharge of the duties 
of his position he shall be recommended to 
the Board of Fire Pension Fund Commis- 
sioners for temporary retirement during such 
disability, and until his restoration to physi- 
cal capacity. 

From Battalion Chief Boden, submitting a 
report of an accident whereby the pipe of 
water tower 2 was damaged by a wagon on 
the 21st inst. Your committee investigated 
the cause of this accident, and in view of the 
fact that the damage sustained was nominal 
and the occurrence purely accidental on the 
part of the driver of the wagon, we recom- 
mend no further action be taken in the 
matter. 

From the Civil Service Commission, return- 
ing without its approval salary demand of 
Chas. E. Shay for difference in pay between 
hoseman and engineer from Feb. 1 to March 
14, 1913, amounting to $:I0. Filed. 

From Acting Battalion Chief Sewell, rela- 
tive to an injury received by L. Wolters, 
hoseman engine 22, while off duty on April 
20. Filed. 

From Jos. Ticknet, hoseman engine 32, re- 
questing that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for fifteen days, without pay, com- 
mencing July 1, for the purpose of transact- 
ing some personal business. Granted. 

From W. P. Delany, machinist at the cor- 
poration yard, requesting that he be granted 
an extension of his leave of absence, with 
pay, on account of sickness. Granted to 
May 1, 1913. 

Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

From the Webb Motor Fire Apparatus 
Company, requesting extension of time until 
May 2(1, 1913, on its contract for motor driven 
chemical. Extension granted to May 1. 

Matter of reprimanding D. O'Donnell, 
truckman truck 5, for assaulting Thomas 
Timmons of that company on March 17; also 
his transfer to truck 8. Put over one week. 

Matter of trial of Howard Holmes, lieu- 
tenant engine 4, for being under the influence 
of intoxicating liquor while on duty April 11. 
Guilty. Deprived of pay from day of sus- 
pension to dav of application for pension. 

From the Civil Service Commission, au- 
thorizing temporary appointments to non- 
civil service positions for i lie month of May. 
Approved. 

From the Secretary of the Board, request- 
ing authorization from the Board of Fire 
Commissioners for payment of the salary de- 
mands of members of this department who 
start on their annual vacations prior to lie 
regular monthly pay day. Approved. 

Resolution dismissing Dennis Quinlan as 
temporary gateman of the auxiliary high 
pressure system. Approved. 

Resolution appointing George Andrews as 
temporary gateman of the auxiliary high 

pressure system. Approved. 

Subscribe for the Pacific Fikkman. 



Saved Stephen A. Douglas from Flames. 

A Chicago dispatch of April 22 recites how 
Stephen A. Douglas, the famous political 
opponent of Abraham Lincoln, the centenary 
of whose birth will be celebrated Wednesday, 
was saved from a fiery death on the day of 
his birth was made public for the first time 
in a letter received by the Chicago Historical 
Society. 

The letter was written by Horatio L. Wait, 
master in chancery, who was a personal friend 
of the -'Little Giant" in the '60's. John 
Conant, one of Wait's ancestors, who lived 
next door to the Douglas home in Brandon, 
Vt., is the man who saved the future stales- 
man's life. 

"The morning Douglas was boin," the 
letter sets forth, "John Conant went to the 
Douglas home and as he entered the room 
Douglas' father was sitting in an armchair 
before an open fire with the infant in his 
arms. Just as Conant entered the father died 
suddenly of apoplexy, the infant rolled down 
into the fire place and Conant snatched him 
from the flames." 

Confirmation of the story has been received 
from relatives of Douglas. 

At the request of Commissioner Pfaeffle, 
who is a committee on stables, the writer 
visited the fire department stables last week 
and through the courtesy of Superintendent 
Harris we were shown the various improve- 
ments since our last visit. The stable proper 
has been raised four feet and painted inside 
and out, a heater and sweating room having 
been added, a door cut in the rear for the 
accommodation of hay, which is a decided 
improvement. The superintendent infoimed 
us that he had the usual number of horses 
under his care, the incoming of motor appa- 
ratus so far seeming to make no perceptible 
difference. The men sleep in the stable every 
three weeks in order to answer all third 
alarms and are compelled to be on duty from 
eleven to twelve hours during the day. 

As the Suffragettes were marching to 
Washington, they met a sister parade at 
Wilmington, Del. As they left Shellpot Park 
a fire engine, which was leaving its house, 
saluted them with several blasts from its 
whistle. 

The rules of the New Orleans department 
prohibiting leaves of absence during the 
Christinas and New Year holidays has been 
repealed, as ihe department is now so well 
equipped that there is no reason for enforc- 
ing the old rule. 

Subscribe for the Pacific Fiukman. 



I eli phone Douh1*i 1 2>5 

U. J. BORCK, the i aii or 

MAKES A SPI < IAI IV OF 

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93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



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660 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Fktneral Orders 

Artistic Decoration* and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Rrach N ursek.es, take Castro street car to 23rd. oi 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

t.> Douglass and 24th streets. 



Phone Merrill 4447 



H. G. WILLIAMS 



Agent Northern California for the 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



PhoeniX r ire ApDlianCe CO T~^E best attention and service for the man who car- 
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x watch, but because he is likely to be that kind 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does sup- 
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know whethtr he is getting it or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell yon a HOWARD Walch. 
Find tlie HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 



WM. F. EIGAN 



Pt, „.. ' Douglas 4<H4 
r^™" /Home C 2842 



> We.l 



586 



• Homes 3174 



VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D. 

1155 GOLDEN DATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



A Howard Watch 
pay tor it. 



is always worth what you 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 

128 POST ST. 21 10-21 14 FILLMORE ST. 



Phone Doudu 4716 



Tin- price of each tvat.li Is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attached — from the 
17-jewel (double roller) in a Cres ent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled casi at -I", to the 53- 
jcwel at $150 — and the Edward Howard model 
Home C 2458 at $350. 



T A 1\ /T A X T r~""TT> T~> /""\ O Admiral Sigsbee has written a llttli 

l\ \/l A \h KLa( )S "The Log of the Howard Watch.- giving the 

Li/lilVIiM Ml i 1 1J1 \VykJ record of his own Howard in thi r s Navy. 

you'll enjoj M Drop us a post-card. Depl N. 
and we'll send you a cony. 



I 12 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 



717 K Street 
Sacramento 



HATS. UNDERWEAR. ETC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



EAGLESON & CO. 

Imporle-s and Manufaclureri 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1118 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 



Telephone Dou«la. 2871 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



WARRANT BROKERS 



Phone Market 54 I 7 



630 KEARW STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO COR COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 

T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

We Do Artistic 

Job Printing 




VOL. X.-NO. 24 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, MAY 3, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Five Persons Burned to Death. 

From the Call of Aprill 26 we get 
the following particulars of last Sat- 
urday night's Presidio fire, in which 
five persons were burned to death: 

Mrs. George H. Schall, wife of first 
class sergeant, United States Army 
Hospital Corps, was burned to death 
last night at the Presidio, and an un- 
identified body believed to be that of 
her mother was found in the ruins of 
the home in which they were trapped. 

Two of the three children of the 
SchalPs were also burned and the third 
child was missing at midnight, and it 
is thought it too is dead. 

The children's names are Henry, 8 
years old; Patsy, aged 4, and Joseph, 
aged 1. The body of the mother and 
of two of the children were recovered 
from the hot ashes of the home by the 
husband and father. 

The woman was a paralytic. She 
was in the quarters with the three 
children. 

Schall had gone to the Presidio hos- 
pital for medicine for his ailing wife. 
She was speechless and unable to move 
and cdiild neither give an alarm nor 
escape with her little ones. 

The Schall's lived in the non-com- 
missioned officers' quarters in Tennes- 
see Hillow, west Cantonments. In the 
building with them lived three other 
families, a cook named Johnson and 
his wife; a civilian electrician named 
Younger, and Sergeant Rogers. They 
were. away at the time of the fire. 

Dr. A. Cade and Private Campbell 
saw the flimves and gave the alarm, 
but before the post fire detail ai d the 
city department could reach the fire, 
the building was consumed. 



When Dr. Cade, Lieutenant Murray 
and Private Campbell saw the flames, 
they rushed to the house, followed by 
several soldiers. They were met at 
the door of the quarters by the flames 
which had entirely enveloped the in- 
terior. It was impossible for them to 
enter. 

Schall had but a few months more 
to serve in the army. 

His wife had been an invalid for but 
a short time. 

The water supply at the Presidio 
was inadequate to combat the flames, 
and it is said that there was no water 
in the section where thefireoccurred. 

Schall was so affected by the terri- 
ble tragedy that it was feared his 
reason would give way and he was 
placed under guard of four men and 
taken to the hospital. 

Across the street from the Schall 
quarters were the quarters of Captain 
Mitchell and Lieutenants Murray and 
Hammond, Sixth Infantry. These 
buildings were endangered, but were 
saved. 

The detachment from the city fire 
department that handled the fire was 
under the direction of Battalion Chiefs 
Bailey and Russell. 

Defective wiring is believed to have 
caused the fire. 



An ordinance creating a special com- 
mission, which will eo-opeiate with 
the tire chief and building inspector 
in revising present building ordinan- 
ces, passed the Oakland City Council 
during last week. The commission 
will consist of an architectural engi- 
neer, an architect and a builder. The 
matter of recommending changes in 
I he fire limits will be one of the duties 
of this commission. 



Fire Prevention Day. 

The Los Angeles Insurance and In- 
vestment News, speaking of Fire Pre- 
vention Day in a recent issue says: 

It is near the beginning of the long 
season when things burn easily, and 
it is a good time, therefore, to clean 
up the rubbish and to get rid of the 
grass and weeds that have grown in 
the winter months. Vacant lots 
cleaned up now will stay clean all 
summer, and a city that is cleaned of 
rubbish at this time of the year will 
be immensely safer from fires for the 
remainder of the year. 

Fire Prevention Day is a good day 
to observe. 

The best way to handle this fire pre- 
vention movement will be to organize 
a state fire prevention society, and 
have it affiliated with the national 
body. 

It is to be hoped that by next year 
that such an organization will be in 
existence in California, and that later 
we will have a fire marshal law. 

Walla Walla 

Cries from an infant averted a se- 
rious dwelling loss last week, and 
probably saved the life of a sick boy 
confined in a room upstairs. A kitchen 
door had been left open near the 
range, and becoming ovei heated, 
burst into flames. The boy was near 
the stove while the mother was tend- 
ing to the patient upstairs and at the 
sight of the tire screamed, thereby 
attracting the mother's attention. 
When she arrived in the room the 
flames were shooting up Ijpe wall, but 
prompt work of neighbors extinguish- 
ed the flames. 









PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Los Angeles. 

The money raised by the two 
"Examiner" benefits for an emer- 
gency fund for the firemen will be 
handled by a Fire Pension Board, 
which has been formed for that pur- 
pose. 

The draft of the new firemen's pen- 
sion ordinance, which has been pre- 
sented to the Fire Commission, pro- 
vides a sum equal to one-half the 
salary of any fireman who is injured 
fatally while on duty, and also allows 
the payment of $1000 to the widow, 
children, dependent parents, brother 
or sister of any fireman who dies after 
five years of service. 

A feat which could not have been 
performed in 45 minutes by an engine 
drawn with horses was accomplished 
in nine minutes when the giant Gor- 
ham gas fire engine ran from Avenue 
Nineteen and Pasadena avenue to 
Oakley and Fair Oaks avenue in Pasa- 
dena, a distance of six miles, in that 
time and did effective work in extin- 
guishing the flames at the home of 
F. E. Miller, pumping the water main 
dry in five minutes. 

Last week the Fire Commission was 
petitioned to secure land in the vici- 
nity of Vermont avenue and Holly- 
wood boulevard for a fire house site. 
This petition was filed, as the Fire 
Commission has already made request 
to the budget committee for an allow- 
ance for afire house in that diatrict. 

The Fire Commission also is consid- 
itig the advisability of converting all 
horse-drawn apparatus in the fire de- 
partment into moto-driven apparatus. 
At present fourteen out of the forty- 
two pieces of fire-fighting equipment 
are motor-driven, and Fire Chief Eley 
states that it is practicable to change 
all to this system. 

Approval has been given by the Fire 
Com mission to the plans of Fire Chief 
Eley for placing twenty-four new 
hydrants in the north and east parts 
of the city. 

The .department has formally ac- 
cepted the two Gorham comb ned 
pumping engines and hose wagons 
which were tested recently. The re- 
port showed, that each of these threw 
streams of more that 700 gallons per 
minute, which is above specifications. 

Engine company 29, on the east side 



of Western avenue, between First and 
Second streets, is now in service. The 
equipment includes one Gorham auto- 
mobile, gasoline, combination pump- 
ing engine and hose wagon, with 1200 
feet of 2J-inch hose and eight men. 

Building Inspector Backus has re- 
ported to the Board of Public Works 
that while heretofore he has consid- 
ered applications for the placing of 
fire escapes on buildings with the view 
of locating them at points where they 
would be of the most service for the 
area affected, he would hereafter in- 
sist, in compliance with a recommen- 
dation of Fire Chief Eley, that fire 
escapes be placed on the frontages of 
buildings. These are of direct advan- 
tage to the fire department in gaining 
access to buildings in cases of fire. 

What They Wanted 

Chief Kreger of the Tucumcari Fire 
Department, Victoria, B. C, writing 
to the Fire and Water Engineering of 
recent date, says: 

"We have just purchased from the 
department of Hereford. Tex., its 
Seagrave combination chemical and 
ladder truck. We got a line on this 
machine through the advertisement 
in your paper. From the replies we 
received, you certainly got our wants 
well circulated. 

Thanking you. we are 

Tucumcari V. F. D. 

F. Kreger. Chief. 

S. Bachorach. Sec. 

Tucumcari, Tex., March 3. 1913. 

Frequency of Hotel Fires. 

It is a startling fact that nearly five 
hundred hotels have been destroyed 
I by fire in the United States and Canada 
i during the last two years. In some 
instances other properties have also 
gone down in the flames with I he 
hotels So numerous have fires been 
j among hostel ries that fire n arshals < f 
j nearly every state of the Union have 
issued instructiets to their insptcteis 
to give more than passing attention t< 
hotels and boarding houses for the 
purpose of obtaining wl ether or not 
they are t quipped for fire fighting and 
to avoid means of ready escape in case 
of disaster; It would seem thai such 
extra precaution would result in cut- 
ting down the number of fires of this 
class. 



Seattle. 

A hurry-up call for the downtown 
fire apparatus was turned in one day 
last week by an automobile which htd 
gotten beyond control of the driver, 
and running on to the sidewalk, 
clipped off a light pole upon which 
was placed an alarm box. The driver 
of the car was arrested, but probably 
will be released because the assistant 
chiefs of the department cannot agree 
on the charge to be brought against 
him. He wasoriginally charged with 
reckless driving, but upon showing 
that the car had gotten beyond his 
control, an attempt possibly will be 
made to bring the car to task for turn- 
ing in a false alarm. 

Salt Lake. 

The Underwriters' Report says Fire 
Chief Bywater is greatly disturbed. 
The peace of mind of the chief has 
been broken frequently of late by 
mischievous boys, who think it great 
fun to see the engines turn out with 
the chief heading the procession. The 
new fire alarm boxes in the residence 
district have keys on the boxes ar,d it 
has become a sport rivaling baseball 
in popularity to break the glass, get 
the key and turn in a false alarm. 
The chief is doing some detective 
work to find the guilty individuals 
and he promises active corrective 
measures if he can catch the culprits. 

The City Trustees of Oiange, Cal., 
have let a contract to the Gamewell 
Company for the installation of a fire 
alarm system to cost $2155. Ten 
alarm hoxes will be put in. 

An ordinance rt quiring fire escapes 
on all buildings of t wo stories or more 
in San Mateo was read and lefetud 
at last week's meeting of the ctvr.cil. 

The fire loss in Sacramento during 
1912 was $88,737.83. according to the 
report of Fire Chief Andtrsc n. Two 
hundred and seventeen alainsvtie 
sounded during the vear, sixteen of 
which were found to be false. 

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PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Charles Waldron will have a role to 
his own liking and that of the public 
next Monday evening and throughout 
the week at the Alzazar, for he is to 
renew his impersonation of Prince Karl 
in "Old Heidelberg, ' ' a character that 
contributed more than a little to his 
popularity when he first led Belasco 
& Mayer's acting corps. In the cast 
with him are all the members of the 
regular stock company and many spe- 
cially-engaged people. A double quar- 
tet of male vocalists, well known 
locally, will sing the rousing student 
songs, and an unprecedentedly-elabo- 
rate pictorial production is promised. 
Aside from its pretty story and en- 
gaging characters, the play possesses 
a wealth of fascinating atmosphere 
which Is chiefly maintained through 
the frolics of the nattily-uniformed 
collegians, with their choruses rich in 
harmony and melodious phrasing. "Old 
Heidelberg" is an everlasting epic of 
youth. Burt Wesner will be seen as 
Doctor Juttner, the Prince's tutor; 
Louis Bennjson as Lutz, his valet; J. 
A. Butler as Graf Von Asterberg, a 
volatile student; Lee Milhu.' ax-Keltev 
mann, steward of a student's corps; 
Roy Clements as Von Haufgh, minister 
of state; Walter Belasco as the inn- 
keeper; Madeleine Louis as Kathie, 
his niece; Clara Beyers as Frau Ruder, 
his wife, and Adele Belgarde as Frau 
Diennel, her aunt, with the remainder 
of the cast carefully chosen. 

Empress Theatre. 

At the Empress Theatre, Sunday 
afternoon. Miss Ida Fuller, assisted 
bv a billet of dancing nymphs, will 
headline the show with a spectacular 
ternsichorqan and scenic fantasy in 
three pirts.. entitled "If." The noted 
classic ibinsouse with her ballet will 
interpret several strikingly artistic 
da 'i-"< in thive different scenes, 
which are d isci ibecl as "Love's Awak- 
ening. " "Nymphs of Niagara" and 
"Imps of the Inferno," the last show- 
ing the spurting of fire and flames. 
"The M;i> or ami the Manicure, " Geo. 
Ade's refreshing and original slang 
classic, will be presented by a select 
company including Jasi F. Feltonand 
Mai lie t'hoale, two local favorites, in 
the title roles. An at) thai fairly 
teems with youthful exuberance will 

be Oile«ed by the Misses Arnelte, 



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buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
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But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 





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9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



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Evelyn and Mary Crighton, program- THE 

ed as "merry maid of melody." Di- 
versified bits of vaudeville from char- 
acterizations, songs and dances to TRIPP RFMFRY PfiMPAlMY 
piano playing make up'their offering. Imrr l » tmtul UUIfirHlll 
Black & White, a duo of pretty and; 
agile young women acrobats are mak- 
ing their second tour of the Empress 
circuit after a short visii abroad. 
Taubert Sisters and I'.rol her Paul. 
xylophone experts, are an importation 
from England) Alfred Keley, a pronr- 
nent Irish comedian, presents "Pcvil 
a Lie." a delightful bit of Irish char- 
acter delineation, and Warn n & Kane, 
black face comedians, complete the bill. 



POS/T/1 II I I ' 1:1 



Blood Poison. Chronic Catarrh, Rheumatism. 



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san Francisco 479 TURK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



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>acih 




IREMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G, PRESTON , Busine ss Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2.00 

"nths 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 
Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 
continuous ones. 

Olid. rial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk St I, 

San Francisco . Tele pho ne Fra nklin 6867. 

Entered a* second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 8. 1879. 



Judge Murasky's dpcision in the Maxwell 
case against the Civil Service Commission, 
whirh the judge has under advisement, it is 
thought, will be handed down either Monday 
or Tuesday. 

At last week's meeting of the Los Angeles 
Fir» Commission, the action of Fire Chief 
E'ev in instructing members of the fire de- 
partment to refrain from political activities 
on penalty of summary dismissal was ap- 
proved by the Board. 



A pungent paragraph writer in a 'recent 
magaziHe wtfrits to know why every town 
loves its firemen, but says its policemen are 
no good Well, for one thing, it's fun to run 
after the firemen, but it's no fun when the 
policemen are running- after you. 

A fireman's lot in the Sacramento, Cal., de- 
partment is evidently not considered a happy 
one, although the pay is $90 per month. There 
were onlv eight applicants for the recent ex- 
aminations for admission. Of these two were 
from callmen and six from outside the de- 
partment. 



Unusual interest is manifested in the cnm- 
'ng suit of the Tacoma firemen against the 
city, demanding that they be recognized 
under the eight-hour law. It is understood 
that should the fiiemen be unsuccessful, some 
of the captains and officers of the department 
will be removed as a result of their activity 
in the suit. 

An exchange says if the 300 politicians' 
assistants in San Diego, Cal., who are expect- 
ing captancies (nothing lessi in that city's 
fire department are favored as they hopeand 
expect, the department will bear a strong 
family likeness to Ariemus Ward's reginient, 
winch wa> to be composed entirely of briga- 
dier generals. 

L*st week an ordinance was presented to 

the Butie Oil) i oUfK-il restricting ire use of 

motor-driven siren whistles lo ibe fire ap- 
paratus, so ihat all will know the lire auto it. 
coming when they hear the whistle sounded 
There has been some complaint that privatt 
parties use the sifen too generally and that 
tho< the original purpose of the peculiar call 
is lost 

TltMcity fathers of Berkeley are determined 



to enforce the speed laws. Last week they 
adopted resolutions making the speed limit 
for fire apparatus twenty-five miles an hour 
in the city streets and only fifteen miles an 
hour in rounding corners. The resolutions 
will be posted in all the firehouses, and the 
drivers will be asked to keep tab on their 
speedometers when responding to alarms of 
fire. The new law, it is announced, "is to be 
enacted for the safeguarding of the public." 

Chief Murphy last week reported that an 
injustice was done Arther F. Bartmann, en- 
gineer of engine company 34, when he was 
cited to answer a complaint filed by Geilsdorf 
& Backman. accusing him of having failed to 
pay a debt due them. When Bartmann, who 
is a new appointee from the Civil Service 
eligible list, appeared before the chief, to 
whom the complaint had been referred forin- 
vestigation, the discovery was made that he 
was not the Bartmann whocontracted the bill. 

Scannell Club Elects Board of Directors 

The Veteran Firemen's hall at 368 Fell 
street was a veritable hive of industry' for 
several hours on Saturday, April 26. Many 
firemen who were off duty on that day assent 
bled there to assist in counting the ballots 
cast in the election for Board of Directors of 
the Scannell Club. 

With a total voteofsix hundred and twenty- 
five ballots cast and sixty-seven candidates to 
be voted on, their task was not a light tine. 
Three and one-half hours elapsed before the 
last ballot was counted and the result ascer- 
tained. 

Notwithstanding the large number of can- 
didates, Alexander George received a vote of 
more than ninety per cent of all ballots cast. 
The vote for the twenty-five highest candi- 
dates, the first nine of whom were elected, is 
as follows: 

1. Alexander George 570 

2. George F. Brown 491 

3. Samuel J. Spear 463 

4. Willis E. Gallatin, Jr 439 

5. Charles J. Brennan 379 

6. Frank L. Smith 262 

7. Eugene Mulligan 250 

8. Joseph Dolan 240 

9. WilliamS. Siewert 233 

10. Dennis O'Donnell 157 

11- John Conroy 115 

12. William J. Conroy 115 

13. Joseph Canning 99 

14. Michael F. Hannan 99 

15. James L Shauahan 93 

16. Frank Lerraan 80 

17. William F. Wedem'eyef 78 

18. William J. Batman 72 

19. Eugene Valente 72 

20. William M. Gill 71 

21. Dennis O'Connell 59 

22. John J. Kennev 55 

23. Vane T. Long 54 

24. John E Gavin 50 

25. Edward O'Malley 50 

Last week, at Pasadena, the patter Mrs 
Robert Duncrn lighted to singe the pin 
feathers of a chicken set the house afire. 
burning it to the ground and causing an esti- 
mated loss of $3(111(1. 



Bursting of High Pressure Main. 

The bursting of a high pressure water main 
in O'Farrell street, between Stockton and 
Powell streets late Tuesday afternoon, caused 
a big section of the street to cave in and a 
flood scene in which men and horses were 
forced to hustle and flee for their lives, and 
in which the rush of water resembled that of 
a roaring torrent, was afforded. The cave-in 
was in front of the double lot that is to be 
occupied by the Anderson theatre. The side- 
walk and the street as far as the car track 
slid into the depression, carrying two empty 
automobiles and an express wagon with them. 

The rush of water flooded the lot so that 
the rescue of the express wagon horse and 
two others was difficult. Wm. C. Little, 
2404 Post street, left one of the automobiles 
just before the break. The other automobile 
was owned by G. M. Anderson. Hugh Hart, 
the express wagon driver, jumped from his 
wagon to avoid being caught. 

Around the Bay Cities. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

Fire of a mysterious origin started in the 
residential district of Berkeley Thursday 
morning, May 1, and caused a loss of $10,000. 
When the fire department arrived the Rowe 
residence on Panoramic Way was blazing 
fiercely. Three alarms were turned in and 
all companies responded, and by hard fighting 
managed to save the adjoining residences. 
Several fires have occurred in this neighbor 
hood lately, and the cause in each case has 
been a mystery. Chief Kenney arid the pohee 
are investigating the matter. 

The Seagrave combination hose and chemi- 
cal has been delivered to the Richmond de- 
partment, and after the test was turned over 
to company 2. The members of the company 
then gave a banquet, which was attended by 
the City Council and members of company 1. 

Chief Murphy of Stockton was the guest of 
Chief Steinmetz of Alameda last week. 

The Oakland Tribune of April 17 says 
that the Alameda Fire Department is vastly 
superior in point of efficiency to the Los An- 
geles organization was the statement of Mrs. 
L. R. Hill of 1400 San Jose avenue, following 
the putting out of a fire which for a few mo- 
ments threatened her home. The statement 
was prompted by the efficient action of ihe 
firemen, not only in extinguishing the blaze in 
the roof of her home, but in caring for the 
chemical spilled, mopping up ihe fluid and 
thereby saving the discoloration of the plas- 
ter, the ceiling and walls. The property is 
owned by Mrs. Ida A. Traveller, The occu- 
pant, Mrs. Hill, stated that she had been in 
three fires in Los Angeles, aid had bten 
uurned out in each one. The d mage will 
amount to $50, fully covered by insurance. 

Last week's Underwriters' Report, com- 
menting on the recent $100,000 Sacramento 
lire, stated that the fire department had a 
long struggle with the blaze, being handi- 
capped through lack of water. The new en- 
gine at, theSecond street station was attached 
to a hydrant at Second and M, but within a 
few minutes sucked the hydrant from the 
ground, breaking the connections and causing 
the loss of a large quantity of water. 






PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

We take the following excerpts from the 
Administrative Committee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From the Board of Fire Pension Fund 
Commissioners, advising that Henry Welch, 
hoseman engine 26, has been retired on pen- 
sion from physical disability, to take effect 
from March 20, 1913. Filed. 

From the Board of Public Works, advising 
that the request for the installation of a hose 
rack at the quarters of fireboat 1 has been 
referred to the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings. Filed. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, re- 
commending that the Board of Public Works 
be requested to have three pits dug in the 
machine shop of the corporation yard for the 
purpose of facilitating the repairing of motor- 
driven apparatus of the department. Ap- 
proved. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, re- 
commending that the matter of providing 
funds for the payment of overtime to me- 
chanics at the corporation yard during the 
ensuing fiscal year be referred to the Finance 
Committee of the Board of Supervisors for 
favorable action. Referred to the Board for 
action without recommendattion. 

Complaint against Thos. B. McCarthy, hose 
man enginel6, for failing to pay adehtof$36 
due Eugene McCoy for necessaries of life. 
McCarthy appeared before the committee 
and agreed to make satisfactory arrange- 
ments for the payment of this claim, and 
your committee accordingly recommend that 
the complaint be dismissed. 

From the Secretary to the Mayor, sub- 
mitting a communication from Colonel Garde- 
ner of the Presidio military reservation, ex- 
pressing appreciation of the services ren- 
dered by this department at the fire at the 
Presidio on the 26th ultimo. Filed. 

From the American-La France Fire Engine 
Company 1 , requesting an extension of lime 
until May 20, 1913, on its contract with the 
department for furnishing two motor driven 
chemical engines. Referred to the Board 
for action without recommendation. 

From the Board of Supervisors, submitting 
a copv of Resolution No. 744 of the Board, 
directing that the fire department replace 
the electroliers destroyed by its apparatus. 
In the above matter your committee desires 
to report that an investigation of the acci- 
d"iit whereby the electrolier at Post and 
K-arny streets was broken by the water tower 
on the 24th ultimo, resulted in the fact that 
the accident, was unavoidable on the 'part of 
the driver, andwe recommend thai .a commu- 
nication be forwarded to the Board of Super- 
vis >rs ;u| visit it! of l i he fact!- in l his mat ter and 
requesting in lormaiion as to what funds at 
the disposal of this Board thai ftiay be legally 
applied for the purpose of restoring the elec- 
trolier in question. 

From E. J.yPhipps, hoseman water towerl, 
requesting that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for thirty days, with permission to 
leave the city,,, on account of sickness. In 



view of the fact that th© above-applicantonly 
finished his probation term in the department 
a few months ago, your committee does not 
desire to make any recommendation in this 
case and ascordingly refers the matter to the 
Board for action. 

From the Board of Public Works, stating 
that it is the intention of that department to 
dispense with the services of the inspectors 
and engineers connected with the auxiliary 
high pressure water system after May 1, 
191-3* and stating that it will therefore be ne- 
cessary to turn the system, consisting of ap- 
proximately 72 miles, over to this depart- 
ment. Also submitting a copy of the report 
of the City Engineer on this subject. In con- 
nection with this matter the Chief Engineer 
reported that in view of the shortness of 
time 1 for action in this matter he had for- 
warded a communication to the Board of 
Public Works requesting that they retain the 
necessary employes until the beginning of 
the next fiscal year, when provision will be 
made for the same. Action of the Chief En- 
gineer approved. 

From Maurice Barrett, driver chemical 9, 
requesting that he be allowed a leave of ab- 
sence for thirty days, without pay, commenc- 
ing July 5. Granted. 

From T. J. Harrington, lieutenant truck 5, 
requesting that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for thirty days from May 1, with per- 
mission to leave the city, on account of sick- 
ness. Granted. 



Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

From the American-La France Fire Engine 
Company, requesting an extension of time 
until May 20, on its contract for two motor 
driven chemical fire engines. Approved. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, re- 
questing that provision be made for the pay- 
ment of overtime for employes of the corpo- 
ration yard, and that same be submitted to 
the Finance Committee of the Board of Super- 
visors. Communication not to be sent. 

From F. J. Phipps, hoseman water tower 
1, requesting that he be granted a leave of 
absence for thirty days, with permission to 
leave the city, on account of sickness. Put 
over one week. 

From the Webb Motor Fire Apparatus 
Company, requesting an extension of time 
until May 20, 1913. on its contract for motor 
driven chemical. Put: over one week. 

Matter of reprimanding D.O'Donnell, truck- 
man truck 5. for assaulting Thos. Timmons 
of that company March 17; also his transfer 
to truck company 8. B'andenstein, Hammer 
and Pfaeffle "aye," Dillon "no." 

Receiving of bids for fifteen sets of telo- 
scopic harness hangers in accordance with 
resolution passed by the Board on March 28. 
Referred to Administrative Committee 

From the Civil Service Commission, calling 
attention to Civil Service Rule 19, covering 
reports on probai loners. Referred to Ad- 
ministrative Committee. 

Subscribe for the PACIFIC FlKKMAN. 



Thought He Won the Capital Prize. 

Captain Lerman at the phone, — "Is that 
you, Captain Kenneally ?" 

"Yes. What can I do for you?'* 

"Have you got the list?" 

"Yes." 

"Can you tell me what number won the 
capital prize?" 

"Yes; it was number 1010." Kenneally be- 
ing aware that Lerman had purchased ticket 
1010, thought it would be a good joke on 
Lerman to make him believe he had won the 
$2,500 prize. 

Lerman immediately called up Battalion 
Chief Russell, telling him he'd like to get a 
day off, as he had some very important busi- 
ness to attend to. 

Chief Russell told him to go ahead and re- 
port for duty on the following morning. 

While Lerman was changing his clothes to 
go down town to draw his $2,500 the list ar- 
rived at quarters, and to his amazement he 
found it was all a mistake; that Kenneally 
had put one over on him. 

It took Lerman almost an hour to get in 
touch with Chief Russell, when he informed 
him that he thought his important business 
could wait, requesting the chief not to report 
him off, which Russell good naturedly 
granted. 

The joke has got out among the houses and 
Lerman is still busy explaining how Kenneally 
put it all over him. 

Ripples Was Too Rough. 

Secretary Kennedy of the Fire Commission, 
accompanied by Dr. Cooney, Tom Hickey and 
the chief of the St. Helena Fire Department, 
left last Friday, April 25, for a thret-day 
fishing trip in the wilds of Mendocino county. 
When asked how many trout they bagged 
Kennedy claimed the ripples were too rough; 
From the way the secretary grinned when 
questioned, it wasn't the ripples, but what- 
ever the reason, he failed to divulge. 

Firemen should acquire the fixed habit of 
presenting always a neat and cleanly appear- 
ance to the public as well as in quarters. It 
not only creates a favorable impression, but 
begets a sustaining self resj ect. It is scarcely 
reasonable of a man who does not respect 
himself to look for much consideration from 
others. It is not the cost of clothing, but the 
scrupulous care of it that counts. 

The American- La France Fire Engine Com- 
pany of California h.ivr moved from 660 Mis- 
sion street, to the Greenwood Building, 151 
New Montgomery street, between Miheion 
and Howard sireets. where tluy have large 
and commodious quarters. 



U. J. BORCK, m ™ LO * 

MAKES A SPECIALTY I 'I 

FIREMEN'S '." UMI-OWMS 

also FINE c/17/./.i.v srns 
93 EDDY STREET San Fr«nci»co 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



U 



American-La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CAUFORNIA 
151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...PI.ORISTS... 



Fresh cut dowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and Dowering plants in variety. 

Sperial attention given to Wedding "'"I h'ttiierttl Order*. 

Artisttr Decorations tniil Designs. 

(iartiening. h'te. 

TELEPHONE MISSION ISS3 

To KkaCH Niirsehies, take Castro street ear to 23rd. or 

Mission. 2Jth street and Hoffman avenue ear 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



p, \ Domfa. 4934 

rhon "/ Home C 2842 



Phone 



iWm . 586 

'HomeS 3174 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Airent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 

WM. F. EGAN 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



VETERINARY SUROEON TO S. F. F. D 

1155 OOI.DEN OATE AVE. 

Telephones Park 1 IT and US -, 4*s«* Franci-sco. Cal. 



Serveau Bros. 



Phone DousUi 4716 



Home C 2458 



FLORISTS 



128 POST sr. 



21 10-21 14 FILLMORE ST. 



1 12 S. -Spring St. 
Los Angeles 



717 K Street 
Sacramento 



LAMANETBROS 

HATS. 11NDKRWEAH. I- TC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



EAGLESON & CO. 

Import** i and Manufacturer. 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Klannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

I I 18 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 



relrphnne I ),.„ B I.- 2«7 I 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



WARRAM BROKLRS 



Phone M.rkel 5417 



G30 KEARNV STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO COR COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



rE best attention and service for the man who car- 
ries a HOWARD Watch - not on account of the 
watch, but because he is likely to be that kind 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does sug- 
geBI » man who appreciate- quality and is quite able to 
know whether he is getting ii or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Walch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a irond man to know. 

A Howard watch is always worth what you 
I pay for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attached— from the 
17-jewel idouble roller! In a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra sola-filled case at $40. to the 23- 
jiwel at $150— and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. 

Admiral Slgobee has written a little? book. 

"The Log of 'be Howard Walch." giving the 
record of his own Howard in the V. g. Navy. 
Ynn-I enjov it. Drop us a post-card. Oei.t N. 
and we'll send ynn a copy. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mast 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AIN'D JEWELRY 

71 -VAI | FR ST. ^ s FRAN CISCO 

We Do Artistic 

Job Printing 




flHEMN 




VOL. X.-NO. 25 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Pity the Insurance Man! 

If any of our readers has a large 
supply of pity on hand and nohody in 
particular to give it to, we suggest 
that he present some of it to the in- 
surance companies— they reed a lot 
though they don't deserve any. 

They have reached the place where 
not only firemen and fire commission- 
ers and magazine writers say that 
their methods are responsible for 
much of our lire loss, but a Grand 
Jury, made up of men who pay fire 
insurance, after hearing much evi- 
dence and after careful deliberation, 
has found that the fire insurance com- 
panies invite fraud by accepting 
"rotten risks," by openly over-insur- 
ing and by carefully refraining from 
fighting claims based on suspicious 
fires. 

The Chicago Grand .Jury tells the 
companies, in effect, that one of the 
pillars supporting the great and 
wealthy business of fire i i deiv ritirg 
is arson, and that they connive for 
their own profit at the operations of 
fire bugs. 

This is surely a very terrible charge 
to make against the v\ < all hy and elo- 
quent gentlemen who are the big 
figures in the insurance world. Ii is 
nol i he busin< ss of the fire ii sui ance 
magnates I" be made i he obji els of 
charges of i his soi I. hit il has been 
emphatically their business to address 
charges of carelessness againsl the 
public, of inefficiency againsl fire de- 
partments, to make speech* s i n Fire 
Prevention Day and in the meantime 
to wink i heir tear- hi dimn i d eyi s al 
i h ' arson which their own mel hods 
foster. Ii is plain, therefore, thai their 



present plight makes them fit sub- 
jects for pity — or something else not 
quite so soft. — Firemen's Herald. 

Drug Company Fire. 

Last Tuesday morning a fire at First 
and Mission streets caused considera- 
ble excitement. The blaze was in the 
office of the Emerson Drug Company, 
on the fourth floor of the Shawmut 
Building, 517 Mission street. 

A small oil stove in the center of 
the room was accidentally upset and 
the oil, spreading over the floor, caught 
fire. An employe tried to open the 
window and throw the stove out, but 
was prevented by the flame surround- 
ing it. By this time the flames had 
reached the woodwork and furniture 
in the office. Ralph Strohmeler, a lad 
of about 16. turned in the alarm. 
Only prompt response by the depart- 
ment and quick work by the men pre- 
vented a serious blaze. 

The loss, aside from the furniture, 
including destruction of many of the 
Accounts and bcoks of the company. 

Berkeley. 

Win. I!nur of Berkeley, at Ihere- 
i|u< si of his parents', was held last 
week by Fire Chief Vollmer, pending 
an investigation of the fire which de- 
stroy* ii the Row e home, E8 Panon mic 
road, one day last wnk. Re we was 
seen in i he vicinitj of thi file tr\ h ur 
befoi e the alai m was turn< d in. 1 h 

was fully dressed. It is lepnl ted thi - 

is the fourth of a number of myste- 
rious earl} mornirg fins which have 
occurred w ithin l he lasl few months, 
and ii is believi d i hat yoi i » Row e 

maj be able to i hrovi s e light upon 

their origin. 



Last Sunday Morning's Blaze. 

Last Sunday morning, early, a fire 
in the dry color warehouse of the R. 
N. Nsson Paint and Color Works, Fif- 
teenth street and Potreio avenue, 
gave the fire department a stubborn 
fight for more than an hour and 
threatened the entire block of paint 
and oil factories. 

The fire started simultaneously in 
the oil filling room and in a laige tank 
of refuse on the sidewalk, a] i are ntly 
from spontaneous eoml ustion, though 
the owners could not account for the 
fire starting in two places. 

Hundreds of cans of kerosene were 
destroyed, the oil igniting under the 
feet of the firemen and driving the m 
back repeatedly. A serious of explo- 
sions threatened to spread (he fames 
to the adjoining factory of the Tair.m 
& Nolan varnish works. 

Butte's Fire Tower. 

The Underwriters' Reporl says [he 
members of the Butte FireDepartnv tit 
are busily engaged in completing the 
lire tower at the Quartz street station. 
Five' of the seven stori* s have' I 
completed and the n en are now on the 
sixth. The lower will measure from 
the sill to the top, 77 fi i i ii inches, 
and w ill be the' high si of its kind in 
the W( Me i n Slat, s, all others be'ing 
but six stories. The tower will ;>i sw i r 
il e' same i ur] o i ai d 

give the men much needed piactice at 
rope, life and ladder wen k. so ll at in 
case' of a fire in a tall build 
will have no trouble reai hing 1 1 ■ 
storii s. The "li fe gun" w ill also I e 
used. Tl ii shi ots a roi e to any de- 
sired poi ei n tended to enable 
pi r "lis in a burnii g buildii g to n 
r< und. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



The Two-Platoon Agitation. 

The present year appears likely to 
be marked by a great deal of activity 
on the part of the advocates of the 
two-platoon system in fire depart- 
ments. 

In Iowa, in addition to a bill on the 
subject which is to be presented to 
the State legislature, the Des Moines 
adherents of the change have secured 
a largely signed petition which is to 
be presented to the City Council. If 
that body declines to adopt the neces- 
sary ordinance, then it is said to be 
their intention to demand a special 
election. 

The Massachusetts legislature will 
consider a bill providing for the sub- 
mission of the two-shift plan to the 
voters in cities of 40,000 and over at 
the next State election. This pro- 
posed measure is probably due to the 
success of the one-day-in-five referen- 
dum, under which 27 Massachusetts 
cities have granted the relief asked. 
Also, a bill having the support of the 
mayor was to be presented this winter 
to the New York State legislature 
providing for the installation of the 
two-platoon system in the Yonkers 
Fire Department. 

In other States, notably Ohio and 
Oklahoma, two-platoon activity also 
appears probable. 

In Lincoln, Neb., those who favor 
the change are hopeful that they will 
succeed this year, as Omaha did six 
years ago. 

Hose Salesmen Must Keep Away. 

A motion has been passed by the 
Council Bluffs, la., City Council, pro- 
viding that no representatives of fire 
hose companies be sent to that city 
when the 2,000 feet of hose needed is 
purchased. The proposer of the mo- 
tion contended that it must cost the 
manufacturers a good deal of money 
for traveling and entertainment ex- 
penses to send their salesmen to get 
contracts, and that this money must, 
in the end, he added to the price of 
the hose. 

The motion is to the effect that it 
be stated in the advertisements call- 
ing for bids that all samples of hose 
be sent by parcel post and that no 
representative of the company for- 
warding the sample should come to 
Council Bluffs. 



Alcazar Theatre. 

"A Tale of Two Cities." adapted 
from Charles Dickens' imperishable 
story of London and Paris during the 
French revolution, is to be started on 
a one-week run next Monday evening 
in the Alcazar, with Charles Waldron 
as Sydney Carton and Miss Justina 
Wayne, one of America's most capa- 
ble and experienced young leading 
women, specially engaged for the 
acting role of Mimi. All the members 
of the stock company and a number of 
extra players will round out the cast. 
Alcazar patrons need not be told that 
Mr. Waldron is eminently qualified to 
give the complex character of Carton 
an impressive interpretation, but it 
may not be amiss to state that Miss 
Wayne is equally well adapted by 
physique and temperament to faith- 
fully portray the little seamstress, 
that which no more pathetic figure 
was ever drawn. 

Empress Theatre. 

Slayman Ali's Hoo Loos troupe of 
eleven swift and intrepid Arabian 
acrobats will toplinethe new program 
that opens at the Empress Theatre 
Sunday afternoen. Mr. & Mrs. Mark 
Murphy, the evergreen favorites, will 
divide headline honors with the Arab 
troupe with their latest Irish comedy, 
"The Coal Strike." Vilmos Westony, 
the only living Wagnerian pianist, 
will offer a large repertoire. Marie 
LaVarre, a radiantly beautiful French 
comedienne comes from the Follies 
i Marigue. Paris, with aongs and sur- 
prises. Ernest Rackett. the "Richard 
Carle of Vaudeville," will dish up 
some unctuous comedy. Hall and 
I Clark are gymnasts of unusual clever- 
ness. Their feats are performed with 
style and finish. Shields and LePont, 
the elite entertainers, are among sev- 
eral other features. 

The Los Angeles City Attornev has 
been instructed to draft ordinances 
necessary tocarry out the two charter 
amendments approved recently by the 
people, providing for the establish- 
ment of relief and pension funds for 
the fire and police departments. 



THE 



TRIPP REMEDY COMPANY 



Horn* phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZN1C Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Brodeiick 
Tel^phow We* 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



POSITIVELY CURES 



Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh, Rheumatism. 



Goitre, Tumorous Growths, Malaria, 



Erysipelas, Scrofula, Lupus, 



Tuberbular-Glands. 



Joints and all Blood Diseases 



479 TURK STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1' A C..1 J' i C 1'IKK M A .. 



When You're Buyln 9 Oil 

buy a g'Ood oil- — Panhard, for instance. You owe it 
to your motor (and your purse) to ^ 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Soie r< ! str : 1iutor for the Pr-crfic Const 543 Oo'den Oste Ave., F.-n Frpndfro 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manajrer 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance J2.00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 
I nserted on the most favorable terms, especially lartre and 
continuous ones. ^__ 

Kditotial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908, at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



The firemen of Alameda are now wearing: 
the regulation blue uniform, having- discarded 
the olive-drab heretofore worn. A $1,000 
death benefit has been paid to the widow of 
the late fire chief Fred K. Krauth. 



The Fire Commission Friday approved and 
ordered spread upon the minutes a communi- 
cation from ihe tenants of the Malta Apart- 
ments, commending- the department for the 
efficient services rendered at a fire April 26, 
in which Battalion Chief Murphy is highly 
commended for his ability in handling the 
fire. A copy was ordered forwarded to him. 

The latest reports from St. Joseph's Hos- 
pital concerning Lieut. Lavaroni's injuries 
is anything but assuring. The doctors state 
he is suffering from a broken hip, a broken 
arm, and a broken pelvis bone, and are not 
sure, as yet, that his skull is not fractured. 
An ex-ray was used Thursday to locate any 
other injuries he might be suffering from. 
The chances are if he pulls through he will 
be a cripple for life. 

In the way of real fire news, which should 
prove of more than passing interest, not only 
to the members of the department, but to 
every school boy and girl of San Francisco, 
that great authority on fire matters, Fire and 
Water Engineering, in its issue of April 30, 
says: "As Fire Chief Sullivan of San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., is moving in the direction of organiz- 
ing a dynamite squad, the Fire Commissioners 
have asked the Supervisors of the city to 
allow a selected crew of firemen to take part 
in dynamiting the foundation of the old city 
hall, on the ground that it would be good 
practice for them." 

Underwriters' Report says owing to lack of 
facilities for holding life saving drills in the 
Oakland Fire Department, a request for a 
practice fire drill tower has been embodied in 
the next budget by Fire Marshal Ball. The 
prooosed praciice tower will be sixty feet 
high, and planned to represent a six story 
apartment house. The firemen will he taught 
how to use scaling ladders and rescue people. 
Ball also asks for another automobile, aero 
hook and ladder truck, automobile tractor for 
use *t the Santa Clara fire station, an auto- 
mobile chassis for the hose wagon at the 
sam j station, and two automobile pumping 
engines. 



Plea for The Firemen 

Under the above head, a writer in a recent 
issue of the Daily News, signing himself 
"J. T. P." says: 

"I see where the San Francisco firemen 
have formed a club to fight for their rights. 
That, I think, is very good. As a citizen 
and a strong democrat, I believe the public 
should give these men the two-platoon system. 
If this city can afford to give the police de- 
partment, after July, one day off for each 
man a week, I cannot see why it should not 
devise some way with the fire department of 
giving two shifts in 24 hours, and one day off 
in seven or even ten days. 

"I am sure our mayor and supervisors could 
devise some plan and present it to the voters 
at the next election, asking the voters to re- 
consider the two-platoon system. It looks 
rather ridiculous to see two bodies under civil 
service, one where the men work 120 hours 
before they are off duty and the other where 
the men work eight hours and are then off 
16. One (police) strolls along at his duty, 
getting fresh air, seeing new things, while 
the other (fireman) is caged like a monkey. 
When he gets up in the morning at 5:45 (if 
he is not on watcht he cleans the stable, the 
horses, trucks, brass work and sweeps up— 
that is if he doesn't go to the drill tower. 
When the bell hits a fire he's off to save 
property and life and returns wet and worn 
out. He must then clean everything, no 
matter how late or how tired he is, before he 
can change his wet clothes. 

"Does the public know that the fireman 
sleeps with his clothes on. This is what the 
public calls a snap. Is it justice to have one 
force given better hours than another?" 

Scanned Club Elect Officers. 

At a meeting of the Directors of the Scan- 
nell Club, held in the Veteran Firemen's 
Hall April 29, the following officers were 
elected: 

President, Alexander George; First Vice- 
President, Willis Gallatin, Jr.; Second Vice- 
President, Eugene Mulligan; Secretary, Chas. 
J. Brennan; Treasurer, SamuelJ. Spear. 

A committee on constitution was appointed, 
composed of Directors Gallatin, Spear and 
Dolan. The initiation, fee, together with the 
first month's dues, was fixed at fifty cents, 
payable on May 1; and it was determined that 
the dues thereafter should be fifty cents per 
month. 

Edward Gallatin was appointed financial 
agent, and members are requested to pay 
their dues to him when he calls. 



The injuries of Lieut. Lavaroni of engine 
17, received while fighting a blaze on the sec- 
ond floor of the American Tvpe Foundry at 
820 Mission street, last Saturday night, was 
thought at the time would prove fatal. He 
was hurried to the Central Emergency Hos- 
pital, but. later was taken to St. Joseph's. 

The lieutenant was leaaing his men into 
the thick of the fire when he crashed through 
a window and dropped to the sidewalk below. 
He received dpep cuts about the face and 
arms from broken glass and internal injuries. 



Hillsborough's Fire Marshal. 

In discussing the appointment of Walter A. 
Grant, for many years a prominent member 
of the San Francisco Fire Department, as 
Fire Marshal of Hillsborough's municipal 
colony, the Examiner of Thursday says: 

Hillsborough, the municipal colony of aris- 
tocrats, which in the last four years has lost 
more than $1,000,000 through fires, is install- 
ing the most perfect fire system that can be 
devised. 

Under the direction of Walter A. Grant, a 
professional fire fighter, who has been ap- 
pointed Fire Marshal by the city fathers, the 
employes of the various estates will be drilled 
weekly in the work of extinguishing flames. 
A minature fire house will be erected on each 
of the larger Hillsborough estates in which 
the requisite apparatus will be provided. 

Grant's scheme is comprehensive in scope, 
as several of the Hillsborough estates each 
employ more than fifty men. "New Place," 
the peninsula residence of Wm. H. Crocker, 
steadily gives employment to about sixty 
men. Chas. W. Clark's ranch, known as 
"EI Palomar." has an equal number of men 
on hand. The Eugene de Sable residence, 
which is undergoing extensive improvements, 
furnishes employment to several score. 

Grant figures that it will take him about 
six months to perfect his system of fire pro- 
tection. 

The Burlingame Country Club, the Jos. D. 
Grant place, the A. L. Stone residence, the 
Chas. W. Clark place, and the Thomas A. 
Driscoll house are among the places visited by 
fire in the last several years. 

Relief for Dayton Fire Department. 

Hon. James Rolph. Jr.. Mayor of the City and County of 
San Francisco. 

Dear Sir:— I hereby present you with a 
draft to the amount of two thousand and 
eight dollars and fifty cents ($2008.50), which 
amount was subscribed by the members and 
employes of the San Francisco Fire Depart- 
ment and which I, as collectnr and secretary 
thereof, desire to have forwarded through 
your office to the Mayor of Dayton, Ohio, and 
by him transferred to Frank B. Ramly, chief 
of the Dayton Fire Department. 

It is the wish of the subscribers that the 
money be distributed amongst the members 
of the Dayton Fire Department who suffered 
losses there during the recent fire and flood, 
by Chief Ramly, in the proportion that he 
may deem just and equitable; preference 
being given to widows and orphans, if there 
be any. Very truly yours, 

Geo. F. Brown, 
Captain Eng. Co. 39, S. F. F. D. 

2136 Geary Street. 



ROSENBLUM=ABRAHAM CO. Inc. 

TAILORS POR MEIV 

IIOS MARKET ST. 

ODD FELLOWS BUILDING 

Phone Market 1503 

UNIFORMS OUR SPECIALTY UNION LABEL USED 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
May 9, we take the following excerpts from 
the AdministrativeCommittee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the Spring Valley Water Company be 
requested to install fire hydrants at the fol- 
lowing locations: S. E. corner Santa Rosa 
and Alemany avenues; S. E. Bush street and 
Burdette Place; west line of Stockton street, 
250 feet north of Bush; S. E. corner Thir- 
teenth avenue and Lincoln Way; S. E. corner 
Twentysizth avenue and Lincoln Way; S. E. 
corner Thirty-fourth avenue and Lincoln 
Way. Approved. 

From Baldwin & Howell, requesting that a 
fire hydrant be installed at Alemany and 
Santa Rosa avenues. On the recommendation 
of the chief engineer your committee recom- 
mend that the Spring Valley Water Company 
be requested to comply with the above. 

From the tenants of the Malta Apartments, 
commending the department for the efficient 
services rendered at a fire on April 26. Filed 
and a copy forwarded to Battalion Chief 
Murphy. 

From the first assistant chief engineer, 
submitting a list of members of the depart- 
ment who have been off duty on sick leave 
for the p?.st three months or over. Recom- 
mend that said members named in this report 
be eited to appear either before the Board of 
Fire Commissioners or before the Adminis- 
trative Committee for examination, as may 
be determined by the Board. 

From the Board of Public Works, relative 1 
to the retaining of certain inspectors and en- 
gineers connected with the high pressure 
auxiliary high pressure water systtm. Filed. 

From James J. Woods, truckman truck 5,, 
tendering his resignation as a member of the 
department. Accepted, to take effect from ' 
date. 

From Battalion Chief Boden, submitting a 
complaint against James Collins and Joseph 
O'llrien of engine 29, for quarreling. After 
an investigation of this matter your com- 
mittee find that the matter was not serious 
enough to warrant any action other than to 
admonish said members and accordingly re- 
commend that the complaint, be dismissed. 

From the chief engineer, submitting a re- 
port from Battalion Chief Boden, relative to 
the efficient duly performed by members of 
the department at the tire at the establish- 
ment of R. N. Nason & Co. on the 3rd inst., 
and recommending that each member that 
worked at that tire be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for t went v-four hours with pay. Ap- 
proved and said members allowed Fuch leave 
alter the annual vacations have terminated. 
From Battalion Chief Boden, reporting 
that Samuel Nelson, driver truck 8, met with 
an accident while olf duty on May 4. Filed. 
From Battalion chief liritt, submitting a 
report of an injury sustained by John Lava- 
roni. lieutenant engine 17, while working at 
a (ire on May 2. Filed. 

From the chief engineer, reporting that 
the headquarters of Battalion Chief Cook 



have been changed from 128 Jackson street 
to the quarters of engine company 1. This 
change was necessitated by the leasing of 
the former headquarters, and recommending 
that the Board of Public Works be requested 
to have the frame building on this site torn 
down, as it is within the fire limits. Ap- 
proved and so ordered. 

From the Industrial Accident Board of the 
State of California, requesting that this de- 
partment submit reports of all accidents to 
members or employes where the disability is 
of over seven days duration, dating from 
January 1, 1913. Recommend that this mat- 
ter be referred to the City Attorney for an 
opinion as to whether the Act under which 
the Industrial Accident Board was estab- 
lished and the provisions thereof would apply 
to members or employes of this department. 
From the Superintendent of Engines, sub- 
mitting a complaint against B. A. Davis, 
watchman at the corporation yard, for ab- 
senting himself from duty without permission 
on May 2. Charges filed. 

Your committee recommends that the City 
Attorney be requested to furnish an opinion 
as to whether a written resignation of a 
member of this department is self operative, 
if in its terms it contains no limitations or 
conditions, or whether it is necessary for 
this Board by proper resolution or otherwise 
take formal action on the acceptance of the 
same. 

Your committee further recommends that 
the following rule governing the Board be 
adopted: 

Whenever the Administrative Committee 
makes any recommendation with respect to 
the action which it deems should be taken by 
the Board of Fire Commissioners on the con- 
duct of any member or employe of the de- 
partment, such member or employe shall be 
notified by the Secretary of the Board to be 
present at the session of the Board at which 
such recommendation shall be submitted. 

The following leaves of absence were 
granted without pay: Captain Muldowney, 
15 days; Edward Downs, 15" days; Chas B. 
Rogers was granted an extension of his leave 
of absence for one month, commencing on 
the 8th inst., with permission to leave the 
city, on account of sickness; J. A. Lewis, 
15 days. 

Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

From J. A. Philips, water tower 1, that he 
be granted a leave of absence for 30 days, 
with pay, on account of sickness. Granted. 

From the Webb Motor Company, request- 
ing an extension of time until May 20 on con- 
tract for motor-driven chemical. Granted. 

Receiving of bids for 2000 feel of one-inch 
rubber fire ho.se. Approved. 

From Gorham Engineering Company, re- 
garding proposed s) ecilications for tractor- 
drawn steam lire engine. Approved. Matter 
lo be taken up after first of July. 

Approvul of specifications for furnishing, 
testing and delivering one or more ga&olfne 
motor tractors. Brandenstein, Harr.merand 



Pfaeffle "aye," Dillon excused. 

Approval of specifications for furnishing, 
testing and delivering one or more steam fire 
engines with gasoline motor tractor attach- 
ment. Brandenstein, Hammer and Pfaeffle 
"aye," Dillon excused. 

Firemen Defeat Park Habitues. 



The Firemen engaged in a game of base- 
ball at Golden Gate Park, Saturday, May 3, 
and demonstrated to the Park Hahitues that 
they can still hold their own in the national 
pastime, defeating the Habitues by the score 
of 7 to 5. 

Eddie Shay was on the mound for the Fire- 
men and he humbled the Habitues by his 
masterly pitching; and it was his bingle that 
put over two runs in the eighth inning that 
clinched the game. McAllister for the Habi- 
tues pitched fine ball outside of that eighth 
session. He was relieved by Tom Comber 
and then the bombardment stopped, as Com- 
ber had the Firemen eating out of his hand 
in the final frames. From a spectator's point 
of view, it was one of the most interesting 
games seen at the Park in a long time. 
Raby of the Habitues gives his version of the 
affair in this way: "It was a tough game to 
I lose and my team is ready for a return game 
any time the Firemen are ready to play, ' ' and 
he winds up with, "that fellow Shay as some 
sweet ball player." 

Those taking part in the game were as 
follows: 

l,,>»ui> Par/. ll<ih<l«< B 

Moholy Catcher Raby 

Shay Pitcher McAllister 

Linderberg First Base Tom Comber 

E. Comber Second Base Sweeney 

Walsh Third Base Smith 

Brennan Right Field Ellery 

Hughes Left Field Bachelder 

Riedy Center Field French 

Hackett Short Stop Terry 

The Firemen expect to play Healdsburg 
about the first of June. 

AChicago dispatch of May 7saysTruckman 
Win, J. Werner turned in a lire alarm to 
enable members of truck company 19 to at- 
tend his wedding. His companions could not 
all be relieved of duty to be his guests, so at 
10 o'clock, when everything was ready for 
the ceremony, Werner pulled a box. 

When the" apparatus arrived Werner ex- 
plained that the "fire" was in his heart and 
ushered the firemen into the home of the 
bride, rubber boots, mackinaws, helmets and 
all. A half hour later tiny Were back at the 
tire station. 

Werner met his bride, who was Miss Sarah 
Miller, when he rescued her from a lire sev- 
eral months ago. 

Jesse I. oh. while working at the R. N. 
Nason lire in Fifteenth stnit last Si i 
lost a valuable sienet rirg. Any | i rs< i l'i >!• 
ing same and returnipg it to owner will re- 
ceive Fuitable rev aid 



Tebphm D.hhI.. I2S5 

U. J. BORCK, in. iailor 

MAKES A SPF.CIAl.TY OF 

FIREMEN'S '. UMFORMS 

ALSO FINE CIVIl IAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



O 



□ 



American -La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 



lustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



o 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 2 *nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Kresh cut [lowers an d boqueta always <<<\ hand. Also 

ornamental and Dowering ulajitG ill Variety. 

■■■,., , .,,.< attt i ■■ n to W ■ ■■ / *uneral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations ami Devtffns. 

Gat dt •">•<:. Etc. 

I'BLEPHONE MISSION 1553 

I'n Iti ten Nl tcsEi it.-, take Caatra street cat lo 23rd, 01 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th sti eets 



Ph..nr M-rrm 44-17 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

I2J8 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



WM. F. 



I Home C 2342 



I NJVsi . 586 



Serveau Bros. 



12-1 ;'OS r S 



FLORISTS 

2110-2114 FILLMORE ST. 

I 717 K Sireel 

Sacia.ienlo 



EAGLESON & CO. 



Imporle s and Manufactu 



MENS FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Hannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

IMS MARKET ST.. c rP . Seventh 



M. R. C I £ 

VRTKRINAR) SURGEON TO S. F. F. I). 
1155 GOLQEN OATE AVE. 

IVIrnhnnes I';.- 1. 117 and II* Run Francisco. Oat. 

Phone Doosla. 4716 

LAMANETBROS 

HATS. UNDI RWEAK. I TC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SKIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suiis Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

M-pUne Donsls. Hf) I Horn. C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 



THE best attention and service for the man who 
ries a HOWARD Watch not on 
watch, but because he is likely to be that kind 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does sug- 
gest a man who appreciates quality :ir d is quite able to 
\ (^ fi^ [\j know whether he is getting ii or not 

Not every jeweler can sell you ;i HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD »ur town and talk to 

him. He ts a good man to knuw. 

A Howard Wat:h is always worth what you 

p [>■ for it. 

The ■ Axed 

tory and a print .1 ticket all 

i (double roller) in n Crcs en I Extra <>r 
BOSS Extra gold-filh d < ise it - 1 I, tO I 
jewel at J150 -and the Edward Howard 
Home C 2458 at 

1 ki 

L g I' the How.)' j ' 8 the 

Hcjvard i' 

I !'■;■( N , 

and we 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston, Mai* 



Phone Market 5417 



630 KEAR.NY STREET 
SAN FRAI RC1AL FF CISCO 



T. H. KILCO 

DIAMONDS ArS'O JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST. S AN FRANCISCO 

We Do Artistic 

Job Printing 




VOL. X.-NO. 26 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, MAY 17, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Purchase of New Motor Fire Apparatus. 

At last week's meeting of the Fire 
Commission, they completed the pur- 
chase of three American-La France 
motor-driven combination hose and 
chemical wagons at a cost of $6266 
each, after a satisfactory test. The 
machines were manufactured express- 
ly for the department according to 
specifications, and are pronounced the 
most modern gasoline fire fighters of 
the kind in the world. The three ma- 
chines were tested on Haight street 
and other steep hills of the city Tues- 
day afternoon, May 6, with a 4500 lb. 
load on a high gear, including men, 
hose and chemical tanks charged, and 
the demonstration showed a speed of 
sixty miles an hour on light grades. 

The machines are equipped with gas- 
oline motors and are intended to serve 
outlying districts, where speed is a 
very important factor in getting to a 
fire. 

With the purchase of the three new 
machines the department now has 
twenty-two pieces of motor-driven ve- 
hicles, including passenger machines 
for the officers, with four new pieces 
ordered. 

The motor-driven apparatus of the 
department represents an expenditure 
of about $130,000, and when the four 
additional machines arrive, which are 
in transit, at a cost of $23,000, over 10 
per cent of the apparatus of the de- 
partment will be motor-driven. The 
budget for the ensuing fiscal year 
allows $10(1.000 for the purpose of new 
motor-driven machines, and, in time, 
tl ntire work of tire extinguishing 

in this city will be done with motors. 



Strike of Salt Lake City Firemen 

The refusal of the Salt Lake City 
Fire Commissioners to raise the sala- 
ries of the members of the fire depart- 
ment, says the Underwriters' Report, 
resulted in a crisis in which every 
fireman in the service, with the ex- 
ception of the chief, tendered his re- 
signation, to take effect Tuesday, May 
6th. For some time it looked as if 
the city might be left entirely with- 
out a department, but Mayor Park, 
who is Commissioner of Public Safety, 
met with the men and persuaded them 
to withdraw their resignations. The 
increase has been agitated for somo 
time. 

Under the existing schedule the pay 
for firemen is as follows: Chief, $200; 
assistant chief, 120; captains, $95; 
lieutenants, $90; inspectors, $90; fire- 
men, first grade, $85; firemen, second 
grade, $80; firemen, third grade, $75; 
superintendent of fire alarms, $100; 
secretary to the chief, $90; engineers, 
90. The ordinance was introduced to 
increase the pay as follows: Assis- 
tant chief, $130; captains, $110; lieu- 
tents, $105; inspectors, $105; firemen, 
first grade, $100; firemen, second 
grade, $90; firemen, third grade, $80; 
superintendent of fire alarms. $110; 
secretary to the chief, $1C0. 

The position of engineer was abol- 
ished by the ordinance, a man for this 
place to he chosen from among the 
firemen. By a vote of three to two, 
the ordinance failed to pass. 

Mayor Park asked the men to re- 
main in the service, promising them 
to continue his efforts to secure the 
increase. As a mark of confidence hi 



him, the men decided to remain in 
the service. 



Eleven Hundred Firemen to Sue. 

Eleven hundred and seventeen mem- 
bers of the New York Fire Department 
have filed claims with counsel to re- 
cover pay during the period they 
served as probationers. The amounts 
asked range from $16.67 to $51. 

In 1907 the legislature passed a bill 
putting probationary fire fighters on 
the pay roll. It became effective on 
July 15 of that year. Five hundred 
of the claims come from men who 
worked for nothing after the law be- 
came operative, and the others may 
ask the courts to decide their cases. 
Counsel for the firemen has submitted 
a dozen claims to the City Comptroller 
as test cases. The complaining fire- 
men didn't learn they were entitled 
to back pay until some of them took 
the examination for promotion. 

Great Falls Gets Two-Platoon. 
The petition of the uniformed force 
of the Great Falls, Mont., Fire De- 
partment was granted on April 1, 
when the City Council ordered that 
the two-shift system be inaugurated 
May 1, and thai four additional men 
be engaged to enable the change to be 
made. 

When the matter was being <!is- 
cussed by the Council, Chief -lain, s 
E. Jewell explained thai ui d< r the 

present system each man was allowed 

one day in eight; that under the now 
9J stem there would he mOl e men re- 

g'ulaily on duty than at the present 

time, and that fir< neii who are oil' 
duty will he subject to call at an\ * 
lhe\ are required. There was no 
rious opposition to the new system. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Hillsborough's New Motor Chemical. 

The San Mateo Times, in last week's 
issue, had the following to say about 
Hillsborough's new American -La 
France motor chemical fire engine: 

Hillsborough's handsome new auto 
chemical fire apparatus arrived last 
Saturday afternoon, and after several 
exhibition and trial trips about the 
Three Cities, was installed in the Geo. 
H. Howard garage at the town hall 
which will be its headquarters. 

Chairman Samuel Knight of the 
Fire Committee announced its arrival 
at the Trustees' meeting Tuesday, 
adding that a few minor articles of 
equipment would have to be added 
before it was accepted. He was au- 
thorized to purchase these articles. 

He said the committee accepted the 
hose, which cost $1100, and the claim 
for this was allowed. The committee, 
he said, recommended the appoint- 
ment of Walter A Grant, an expe- 
rienced fire fighter of San Francisco 
as chief of the department and custo- 
dian of the engine and equipment. 
Salary was fixed at $125 a month, 
and on motion of Mr. Scott, he was 
elected. 

The new chief was then instructed 
to respond at all times with his equip- 
ment at the request of the San Mateo 
or Burlingame departments. Mr. 
Knight stated it was their intention 
to organize some sort of volunteer fire 
department, with regular drills, the 
details of which had not yet been 
worked out. 



was destroyed by fire, the loss aggre- 
gating $10,000. The employes of the 
Oroville station did not observe the 
strike order. The origin of the fire is 
not known. 



Fire in the Harrison Primary School 
last Monday morning sent 178 children 
out of the building in quick time by 
means of the fire drill. No panic 
marked the progress of what might 
have been a serious blaze. 



The two new fire engine houses 
under construction for the depart- 
ment—engine 24 at Hoffman avenue 
and Alvarado street, and engine 47 at 
Girard and Wildo streets— are rapidly 
nearing completion. 

Alcazar Theatre. 



material songs and comic impersona- 
tions. Swaine-LePlatt & Swaine, a 
trio of musical artists, in a delightful 
musicale and "Signa," "The Girl 
from Norway, "a young woman whose 
identity no one knows, will contribute 
some clever character work. The 
Essanseescope will show some photo- 
plays fresh from the producer's 
studios. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



Berkeley. 

Owing to the recent disastrous fires 
in Berkeley, the residents of Pano-' 
ramie Way, an exclusive section of 
the city, are about to form a volun- 
teer fire department, and have notified 
the City Council of their plans. One 
of the reasons siiven is that the women 
of that section are in a nervous state 
over the numerous fires of undoubted 
incendiary origin that have occurred 
in ihe neighborhood. An investiga- 
tion of the charge that the firemen 
have been unable to secure sufficient 
water pressure to subdue the fires in 
the recent blazes will also be made by 
Prof. Lewis. 



At Oroville, May 12, the Pacific Gas 
and Electric Company's sub-station 



Charles Waldron's farewell week at 
the Alcazar begins next Monday even- 
ing with an elaborate production of 
Edward People's beautiful play, "The 
Prince Chap," in which he will have 
the title part. This offering will also 
be the medium of closing Justina 
Wayne's all-too-brief engagement in 
the O'Karrell-street home of drama. 
She will be seen in two distinct char- 
acters. Also in the cast are the re- 
gular stock company and several 
specially-engaged players, among the 
latter being two very clever children. 
Mr. Waldron is eminently qualified to 
give a satisfactory impersonation to 
Peyton. In the first act Miss Wayne 
will be seen as the mother of Baby 
Claudia and in the final act as eighteen- 
year-old Claudia, who she portrayed 
j in this country and Australia when 
! the play was in the heyday of its 
popularity. 

Empress Theatre. 

Joe Boganny's Royal Luna tic Bakers, 
an English comedy acrobatic act, will 
headline the bill at the Empress, with 
an original creation called "Fun in a 
Bake House." Theadded feature at- 
traction is Roland West's tabloid drama 
en I it led "Trapping Santa Clans," with 
Caddie Hayes, a juvenile actress and a 
supporting company of three. Fred 
Holmes and Lulu Wells, adueof youth- 
ful musical farceurs promises to he 
another pleasing feature. The title 
of their dainty contribution is "Just 
Because." Joe Kelsey. a character 
sinking comedian, will offer his latest 



THE best attention and service for the man who car- 
ries a HOWARD Watch-not on account of the 
watch, but because he is likely to be that kind 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does sug- 
Itesl a man who appreciates quality and is quite able to 
know whether he is setting it or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attache^ — from the 
17-jewcl (double roller) in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at St", to the 23- 
lewel at $150— and the Edward Howard model 
at |350. 

Admiral Sigsbee has written a little nnnk, 
"The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record "f his own Howard in the I'. S. Navy. 

You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, D-.pt. N. 
and we'll send you a copy. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston, Mass 



T. I-l. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AIND JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST.. . SAN F RANCISCO 

Home phone S 25 1 7 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

VNDKKWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2206-98 (iKARY S1Rl.LT 

Near Broderick 
TelenHor* W« 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 

THE 

TRIPP REMEDY COMPANY 

POSITIVELY CIKIS 

Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh, Rheumatism, 

Goitre, Tumorous Growths, Malaria, 

Erysipelas, Scrofula, Lupus, 

Tuberbular- Glands, 
Joints and all Blood Diseases 

479 TURK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Safe, Sane and Reliable Motor Fire 

Apparatus 



The Santa Cruz (California) Evening News 
of April 24, 1913, relative to the recent Municipal 
Exhibit in that city, says: 

Probably the most comprehensive practical display 
in the Armory is the municipal fire department. Here 
we see figures that tell the advantages of motor-driven 
fire apparatus over the old horse-drawn system that 

" should shame some of the lying croakers that are abroad 
on the streets shouting "graft" and stirring some one 
else s political porridge incidentally. Using a six-months' 
period for comparative purposes it is shown that where 
the horse-drawn vehicle of the past days answered 
forty-two calls at a cost to the city of upkeep of 
$204.92, the faster motor-driven apparatus answered 
the same number of calls, going a distance of thirty-two 

" miles further, AT A COST OF $22.78. When it 
is considered that the motor-driven apparatus cost 
$2348 more than the two horses and the hose-cart 
the city comes pretty close to having a splendid invest- 
ment. To the credit of the increased cost of the newer 
apparatus may be placed the increased speed to fires, 
resulting in lower insurance rates and a greater saving 
of personal properly, and the almost imperceptible 
percentage of depreciation as compared to the old 
apparatus." 

The apparatus to which such a high compli- 
ment is paid in the foregoing paragraph is an 
American-La France Type 10 four-cylinder 70- 
horsepower double 40-gallon combination chemical 
engine and hose wagon with hose carrying capacity 
for 1200 feet 2A inch. This selection and purchase 
was made as the result of an exhaustive investiga- 
tion and comparison by Santa Cruz municipal and 
fire department officials. As the resul) of the in- 
vestigation the vole of the Santa Cruz City Council 
stood four to one for the American-La France. 
Among the many harsh remarks of the disgruntled 
representatives of competing apparatus at the 
time was one made on the floor of the Santa Cruz 
City Council by a well-known fire apparatus repre- 
sentative, who is now circularizing the California 
territory to the effect that his concern up to this 
time has sold more pieces of motor apparatus in 
this slate than any other (which is a lamentable 



fact), that at that time San Francisco had con- 
tracted for three pieces of so-called motor fire 
apparatus— "one piece of real motor fire apparatus 
and two experiments." Subsequently the piece of 
alleged "real motor fire apparatus," after two in- 
effectual attempts to fulfill its contract require- 
ment-, was withdrawn by. its San Francisco agency 
rather than suffer official rejection. The two so- 
called "experiments" duly qualified under San 
Francisco conditions and requirements, and have 
ever since been regularly attending San Francifco 
fires. One of the referred-to "experiments" is 
the American-La France Type 10 four-cylinder 
70-horsepower double 80-gallon straight chemical 
engine in Bush street, between Kearny and Grant 
avenue, San Francisco. This apparatus was 
placed in service February 1, 1912. With the ex- 
ception of repairs necessitated through collision 
with a high concrete sidewalk and an electrolier 
light pole, this machine has never been out of 
seivice for repairs or adjustment of any kind. 
It has more than met every service demand made 
upon it. As to its attempt to climb the lamp post, 
it was not demonstrated that it could not do it, 
for the pole broke off short at the sidewalk before 
the "experiment" was concluded. The "experi- 
ment" came through the "experience" suffering 
only minor injuries. 

The manufacturers' claims for the stability 
and safety of this apparatus were more than 
verified by this incident, for, notwithstanding 
that subsequent official investigation developed 
that the apparatus was travelling al a speed of 
not less than thirty miles an hour, the apparatus 
was not overturned, and not a man of the five 
thereon left his position on the machine. The 
circumstances were such that the driver was 
forced to take to the sidewalk rather than run 
the risk of killing a lady and three gentlemen in 
a touring Car that was trying to speed over a 
crossing ahead of the tire apparatus. 

Perhaps the good firemen who happened to 
be riding thereon arc not satisfied with the 
American-La France. Call and ask them about it. 

Birds will come home to roost, 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance 52 

Six months l'n 



ADVERTISEMENTS 
Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 
continuous ones. 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6S67. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908, at thfl 
Postolfice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



Mayor Rolph Transmits Relief Fund. 

\ Mayor's Office 

?San Francisco. May 12, 1913. 

Captain Heorge F. Brown. Engine Co. No. 39 S F F D 
2136 Geary street. San Francisco. 

Dear Sir: — 1 have for acknowledgment 
your letter of Ihe 6th instant, enclosing draft 
for $2008.50, which you request me to send to 
the Mayor of Dayton, Ohio, for distribution 
among the firemen of that. city. 

I congratulate the members of our fire de- 
partment for the generosity shown by them 
as an expression of their sympathy to firemen 
in another community, on whom misfortune 
has fallen. 

As you will see by the enclosed copy, I 
have forwarded the draft, as requested by 
you, to Mayor Phillips, explaining jour desires 
in the matter of its disposiiion. 
Yours very truly, 

James Rolph, Jr., Mayor. 

(COPY I 

San Francisco, May 13, 1913. 

Hon Edwatd Phillips, Mayer of Dayton. Dayton. Ohio. 



Brave Officer Rescues Two Lives. 

Motorcycle Officer Louis LaPlace is a real 
fire hero. Last Wednesday he rescued Mrs. 
Mary Johnson and her twodays-old baby 
from a burning building at 292 Moultrie street. 
He rushed into the blazing structure and re- 
turned with the mother and baby. The three 
of them were almost lost when the stairway 
on which the officer was staggering with his 
burden collapsed beneath their weight and 
sagged almost to the floor, tumbling him, the 
woman and child down the flight. 

At the foot of the stairs the firemen reached 
for the trio and dragged them into the open. 
The baby, almost strangled, was still elapsed 
to its mother's bosom. Neighbors immediately 
cared for the three and they were soon 
revived. 

When LaPlace arrived on the ground, he 
asked if all were saved. The husband cried 
to him: "No, my wife and baby are in (here, 
but it is tori late to save them." The officer 
immediately went into the blaze with the 
above result. 

The building was a three-story structure, 
the ground floor occupied by the grocery 
store of Matthew Matson. who owned the 
property, while the Johnsons lived above. 
The origin of the fire is unknown. The build- 
ing was gutted. The damage is estimated 
at $3000. 

Large Ears and Fire Fighting. 

A correspondent writes to the Fireman's 
Herald from Tucson, Ariz., Ihatthe members 
of that city's fire department have been dis- 
cussing whether men with large ears make 
the best tire fighters, after reading a state- 
ment credited to Chief Jacob Klein, Albu- 
querque, N. M., that firemen with big side 
wheels are the most valuable men in a fire 
department. 

Our correspondent says that Chief Harry 



Dear Mr. Mayor:— 1 take pleasure in band- Parker, Tucson, when asked for his opinion, 
ing you herewith check for $2008.50, which replied: "It's a new one on me. I don't 
the fire department of San Francisco has re- i think there is anything in it. Men wiih big 
quested me to semi you for disposition, as ears may be generous and good-hearted but I 
expressed in Ihe following extract from letter, doubt if they would make any better firemen, 
received from Secretary George F. Brown, Judging by the way animals are it looks as 
captain engine company No. 39. S. F. F. D. : though the bigger a man's ears are the more 

"It is the wish of i be subscribers that the stubborn he would be. It's hard to get a mule 
money be distributed amongst the members j with long ears near a fire." 
of the Dayton Fire Depariment who suffered The statement reported to have been made 



Thrilling Escapes from Fire. 

Early last Monday morning a fire partially 
destroyed the Lafayette apartment house on 
Dwight Way, Berkeley. There were many 
thrilling escapes owing to the halls being filled 
with smoke. 

The building has fifty-two apartments and 
extends a whole block, having about 200 occu- 
pants. R. W. Madison, one of the tenants, 
was the first to notice the fire. He was 
awakened about 3 o'clock to find his apart- 
ment so dense with smoke that he could not 
see the electric lights. 

Madison, finally fighting his way to the door 
leading into the hall he sent in an alarm, and 
then groped his way back into his apartment 
to rescue his wife and child. Mrs. Madison 
had collapsed at the foot of the bed and the 
baby, Ryland, 4J years, was staggering 
around the apartment. Mrs. Madison man- 
aged to get to the window, where her husband 
helped her over the ledge and holding her by 
the wrists, dropped her to the ground, a dis- 
tance of ten feet. Then he handed out the 
baby. 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles Z. Ellis with apart- 
ments on the top floor, fought their way 
through smoke-laden halls to the fire escape. 

Owing to the refusal of a raise in salary 
three firemen quit the Salt Lake City Fire 
Department last week. One of the disap- 
pointed men commented on the affair as fol- 
lows: "It isn't money enough for twenty-one 
hours and^forty minutes of alertness every 
day. I hated to quit and only did it when I 
became sure there was no chance that the 
pay of the firemen would be raised. I have 
another good job to go to, but I would like to 
see things different for the boys who stay 
with the department." 

The World's Fair buildings and grounds 
committee has awarded a contract for con- 
struction of three fire houses on the Exposi- 
tion site, to H. Chase. 



losses thnre during the recent fire and flood, 
by Chief Ramly, in ihe proportion that he 
mav deem just and equitable, preference be- 
in", given to widows and orphans, il there 
be any. ' ' 

This check goes to you as an expression of 
Ihe di-ep sympathy of our fire boys for their 
brother firemen stricken and suffering, 
through Hie recent terrible calamity that has 
befallen your community. 

Thanking \ mi in anticipation of your kind 
attention to the request herein, and with best 
wishes, I am. 

Very sincerely \ours. 
(Sgd ) James Rolph. Jr., Mayor. 

Lieut. Malloi-k's case was submiited Wed- 
nesday. Decisions in both the Maxwell and 
Matlock ca»es will be handed down ihis com- 
ing Week 



by the Albuqueique chief follows: 

"The fellows wilh big ears are not reckless, 
although sometimes they may appear to be. 
They are simply brimful of vitality and they 
find an out let in action. They never see danger 
ahead and when Ihey get in a 'tight' place 
ihey always are the fellows who escape. I 
don't mean that they run away when they 
finally realize that they are in danger, but 
these fellows with ihe big ears seem to have 
charmed lives. 

"Anoiher point in favorof the man with big 
ears is that he usually is not a grandslander. 
He is full of dash whether he has an audience 
or not. I do not mean ihat the fellows with 
spare ears, laying close to their heads, are 
always granristanders or thai they do not have 
■pep.' Often they make just as good firemen 
as the others." 



A Los Angeles dispatch of May 12 says 
Captain Thos. J McDonald, 60 years old, 
defied death as a member of the local fire de- 
partment for more lhan twenty years, with- 
out sustaining any injury, but died to-dav as 
the result of a fall of nine feet from a step 
ladder, while dusting a shelf, during leave of 
absence. 

Walter Hannan, engineer of engine 1, it is 
reported, was married last Tuesday to an es- 
timable young lady of this city and hied them- 
selves to Los Angeles where they will spend 
their honeymoon. Walter Griffin, a member 
of the same company, if rumor is to be be- 
lieved, is also contemplating matrimony in 
the near future. 



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TAILORS FOR MEIN 

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Ph. 



UNIFORMS OUR SPECIAtTY 



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UNION LABEL USED 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 



At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
May 16, we take the following excerpts from 
the Administrative Committee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From Geo. Linehan, lieutenant engine 13, 
requesting that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence, without pay, from June 16th to July 
1st. Granted. 

From the Civil Service Commission, advis- 
ing that the demands of members of this de- 
partment whose annual vacations begin on or 
after the 15th day of the month will be ap- 
proved for the full month when presenttd at 
that office, in order that said members may 
receive their salary when going off on such 
vacations. Referred to secretary with in- 
structions to prepare said demands for pay- 
ment in advance of regular monthly demand 
list. 

From the Secretary to the Mayor, relative 
to the creation of new positions in connection, 
with the high pressure auxiliary water sys- 
tem and stating that recommendations for 
such places will be made as are included in 
the forthcoming budget. Filed. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, re- 
questing that a ruling be made as to whether 
Richard Cole, John Kane and G. D. Harper, 
machinists at the corporation yard, are en- 
titled to annual vacations during the present 
year. Said employes having worked at the 
corporation yard for several years past, but 
were dismissed and reappointed under civil 
service. Said employes allowed annual vaca- 
tions this year. 

From Captain Rocca, acting battalion chief, 
submitting a report of an accident to the fire- 
boat Dennis T. Sullivan by the propreller 
coming in contact with some submerged ob- 
struction on the 9th inst. Filed. 

From Charles Mulloy, lieutenant engine 7, 
requesting that he be allowed a leave of ab- 
sence for fifteen days, without pay, com- 
mencing June 16. Granted. 

From the chief engineer, submitting com- 
plaints against officers of companies for fail- 
ing to respond to alarms of fire with their 
companies in accordance with the rules as set 
forth in the assignment bonk, as follows: 

C. J. Brennan, lieutenant truck 4, for fail- 
ing to properly respond to an alarm of fire 
from box 78, while acting as captain of en- 
gine 8, on the 2nd inst. 

Thos. Magner, captain engine 20, for fail- 
ing to properly respond with his company to 
an alarm of fire from box 78, on the 2nd inst. 
Jas. Feeney, lieutenant engine 21, for fail 
ing to properly respond to an alarm of fire 
with his company from box 78, on the 2nd inst. 
Geo. Brown, captain engine 39, for failing 
to properly respond to an alarm of lirt' with 
his company from box 78, on the 2nd inst. 

The above named members appeared be- 
fore your committee and admitted that they 
had made a mistake in pegging up on their 
assignment boards. As these mistakes were 
clearly unintentional upon the part of said 
members your committee does not believe 
that the same call for any special action, and 



after cautioning them to use more care in the 
future, we recommend that the complaints be 
dismissed. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, rela- 
tive to a resolution of the Board providing 
for time allowance, etc., for overtime worked 
at the corporation yard bv employes. Re- 
ferred to the Board for action without re- 
commendation. 

From the City Attorney, submitting an 
opinion in the matter of resignations of mem- 
bers and advising that this Board has no legal 
power to take any formal action. Filed. 

From Harry Carter, hoseman fireboat 1, 
requesting that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for five months, without pay, commenc- 
ing June 1. Granted. 

From Jas. Flater, lieutenant engine 29, 
submitting a complaint against John Mc- 
Carthy, hoseman engine 29, for being under 
the influence of intoxicating liquor while on 
duty on the 11th inst. Also complaining 
against the treatment accorded him by Batta- 
lion Chief Boden in relation to this matter. 
Referred to the Board for action without re- 
commendation. 

From the chief engineer, submitting com- 
plaints against Captain W. J. Byrne of engine 
16 and Captain W. F. Curran of engine 9, for 
failing to properly respond to an alarm of fire 
with their companies on May 2. The above 
named captains appeared before your com- 
mittee and admitted they had made a mistake, 
and as the same was not intentional your 
committee recommend that the complaints be 

dismissed. 

Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

Report of members of this department who 
have been off on sick leave for three months 
or over. O'Farrell, Jeffers, Hart, Higgins, 
Rogers and O'Keefe appeared. All reported 
improvement with the exception of O'Farrell. 
From the Superintendent of Engines, rela- 
tive to overtime work at the corporation yard 
by employes. Referred to Administrative 
Committee. 

From Jas. Flater, lieutenant engine 29, 
submitting a complaint against John Mc- 
Carthy, hoseman engine 29, for being under 
the influence of intoxicating liquor while on 
duty on the llth inst; also complaining 
against the treatment accorded him by Batta- 
lion Chief Boffen in relation to this matter. 
In this case considprame'discusbion ensued as 
to whether McCarthy was intoxicated. After 
hearing the testimony of both the chief and 
lieutenant, the Board w;is unable to decide 
what action to take and flnallv put I he mat- 
ter over until next week. 

From the t'ivil Service Commission, cerfi 
fying Owen E. McNulty f< »r appointment as 
hoseman. Appointed. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the Finance Committer of the Board of 

Supervisors apply the remainder of the ap- 
propriation tor im'w buildings and sites to the 
Board of Public Works for plane and specifi- 
cations for new lire houses. Approvi d 
At a special meeting of the Fire Commit 



sioners Wednesday the trial of B. A. Davis, 
watchman at the corporation yaid, for ab- 
senting himself from duty without permission 
on May 2, was heard. He was found guilty 
and deprived of 30 days' pay and given two 
months to pay it — 15 days each. 

Would Make Divorce Compulsory. 

In contradistinction to Judge Graham of 
this city, known throughout the Pacific Coast 
as the great reconciler of married couples 
with martial woes, now comes Judge Gemill 
of Chicago who advocates that divorce laws 
instead of laws to make divorces harder to 
obtain should be made compulsory. Judge 
Gemill, it is said, has perhaps listened to 
more miseries of martial woes than any other 
judge in the United States. 

"There are people living together to-day 
who should be forced by law to separate," 
says Judge Gemill. "There are women suf- 
fering untold misery through a mistaken 
sense of the binding quality of the marriage 
tie. God never meant that a woman should 
spend all her days with a brute." 

Kurt F. Neitzke, recording secretary of 
the Los Angeles Firemen's Relief Associa- 
tion, was a welcome visitor at this office last 
Wednesday. 

Driver Ed. Downs of chemical 12, it is ru- 
mored, was to be married to-day (Saturday.) 
The bride, we understand, is one of Visalia's 
fairest daughters. 

It is reported that Lieut. Lavaroni is getting 
along nicely, considering his condition. He is 
the recipient of many callers, both friends, 
relatives and firemen. 



Mrs. O'Malley, wife of Engineer O'Malley 
of engine 2, it is reported was very low. 
They have the sympathy of every member of 
the department, who hope for Mrs. O'Malley's 
speedy recovery. 

Battalion Chief Cook has gone to Maraga 
Valley on a hunting and fishing trip. We 
hope the game warden won't pinch him this 
lime for killing all the game. The members 
of engine 1 are making preparations to give 
him a royal reception on his return. 

Battalion Chief Wills, senior chief of the 
department, has about made up his mind to 
retire from the service, having put in forty 
years fighting fires. It is thought his appli- 
cation to be retired will come up before the 
next meeting of tin* Pension Board. 

Driver Jim Cronan of engine 21 was knock- 
ed oft his engine; in collision with an in- 
bound Haves street car last Monday i 
while responding to a still alarm. His injuries 
are not at all serious, we are pleased to 
t ounce, being nol hing w nrse t nan the : ■ 
lure of a f mall bone ov< r the U ft « j e. The 
middle horse of the team waa killed in 
collision. 



Ttkpbott Dooda 

U. J. BORCK, IHI tailor 

MAki s \ spi ciai n 

PIKEMRN'S V LNIPOkMS 

FINE CI\ 1 1. 1 i.v srirs 
93 EDDY SIR! I I San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



American -La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and HoweiinK plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders, 

Artistic Decorations and Designs, 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

Tit RKACH Nuksehies, take Castro street car (o 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Ph„„« > CWas 4934 
Fhon«, HomeC2842 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



LOTS $150 



$150 LOTS 



EASY TERMS 



IN 



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M. n. C. V. s. 

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1155 GOLDEN UATl 



Telephones Park 117 and US 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 



21 10-21 14 FILLMORE STREET 




■ancisco. Cal. 



I 12 S. Spring St. 
L.os Angeles 



717 K Street 
Sacramenlo 



EAGLESON & CO. 

impoxlett and Manufacluiers 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

I I 18 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 



Phone Douela. 4716 ^ ' PTSJe C 2458 

LAMANETBROS 

HATS. UNDFRWEAK. ^^C 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douilas 287 I Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 



Phone M.rk.-l 5417 



630 KEARNV STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Marine View Terrace 

(THE PIEDMONT OF RICHMOND) 
DON'T 

let this opportunity pass by. This is absolutely 
your last chance to get close in property at such 
prices and terms. 

Only seven minutes walk from the 
City Hall. Ashland Avenue will reach 
Marine View Terrace through the municipal 
tunnel and continue en thrcuth the entire length 
of the property to the new ferry from which beats 
will run regularly to and from San Francisco. 

Bonds have been sold and the monty is 
now in the hands of the Cily Treasurer fcr the 
immediate construction ol thf:e improve rr enis 
and values will double and treble in a very 
short time. 

Don't delay — bi y now instead of 
wishing you had ater on. 

For maps or further information, see or write 

WENHAM & PAUL 

1444 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, California 




VOL. X.-NO. 27 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Tractors for Fire Apparatus 

At the latest convention of the In- 
ternational Association of Fire Engi- 
neers, R. H. Bowker, chief of the fire 
department of Passaic, N. J., read a 
paper entitled "Tractors for Steam 
Fire Engines, Aerial Trucks and 
Water Towers," in which he favored 
the use of tractors, in which opinion 
he was supported by Chief Kenlon of 
the New York Fire Department. The 
Passaic department has one 90-horse- 
power truck which pulls an aerial 
truck having a 75-foot extension lad- 
der and weighing 10 tons; also an 80- 
horsepower truck pulling an ordinary 
size city truck. During the year from 
May 30, 1911, to May 30, 1912, the 
tractors cost an average of $8.85 a 
month, while the horses used for the 
same apparatus had cost $90 a month. 
The sum named in the case of tractors 
included repairs of every description, 
while in the case of horses it included 
only the feeding and shoeing and did 
not include harness repairs and veteri- 
nary fees, which would have brought 
the cost of maintaining the five horses 
up to $100 month. During the eigh- 
teen months that the two tractors 
have been in service there has not 
been a single instance when they had 
experienced any trouble in s -farting or 
in arriving at or returning horn a fire. 
The tractor was very effective in pull- 
ing the heavy apparatus up the steep 
hills, making eight miles an hour on 
the steepest of them, and also in the 
winter season when snow and ice in- 
terfered with horse-drawn apparatus. 
In one instance, when it had been 
snowing continuously for twenty-four 



hours, a run was made through snowed- 
up streets, which had not been broken 
by traffic, at a speed of 15 miles an 
hour, which is about three times as 
fast as the best horses could have done 
under similar circumstances. 

Chief Bowker preferred the tractor 
for steam fire engines rather than 
using gasoline for pulling power on 
the same frame with steam boiler and 
pump. In fact, all the auto hose 
wagons in the city are practically 
used as tractors, as the horses of the 
department have been entirely dis- 
pensed with and the steamers are 
drawn to the fire by auto hose wagons 
whenever they are needed. 

Chief Kenlon stated that the New 
York department had definitely 
adopted the tractor, having more than 
fifty of them in use or ordered. One 
of the first of these was placed in ser- 
vice in connection with a second size 
engine, and in six months from Feb- 
ruary 19 to August 19, it made over 
500 runs and in no case failed to reach 
the fire when desired and in almost 
all cases in faster time than horses. 
In comparing the tractor and the 
horse from the financial point of view, 
this speaker took up the matter of in- 
terest and depreciation in each case. 
He assumed the tractor cost $5,500 
and a team of three horses $1,050. 
Interest he assumed at 4 per cent, the 
life of a tractor he estimated at twelve 
years under New York City service. 
The average life of a horse in the New 
York Fire Department is seven years. 
He thus makes a depreciation charge 
on the three horses of $150 and an in- 
terest charge of $36.75. Feeding and 
bedding he figures at $380, veterinary 



service at $50 and shoeing at $120. 
This would make an annual charge of 
$736.75 per year on the three horses or 
about $20.50 per month for a horse. 

In the case of the tractor, he figured 
a depreciation at $333 per year, inter- 
est $140, gasoline and oil $100, and re- 
pairs $100; making a total annual cost 
for the tractor of $673— a difference on 
this basis of $63.75 -">er year in favor 
of the trac 

In other c. es \ conditions are 
not nearly so strenudus, the life of 
both the apparatus and the horse 
would probably be longer, and the 
prices for repairs, gasoline, etc., as 
well as depreciation would be corre- 
spondingly less, while the interest 
would be the same. 



The Two-Platoon System. 

Under the above head, the Fire- 
man's Herald of recent date, edito- 
rially said: 

The legislatures of a number of 
cities are going to be busy this year 
considering bills relating to the intro- 
duction of the two-platoon system in 
fire departments. In some localities 
it is sought to have compulsory legis- 
lation passed, while in Massachusetts 
all that is to be asked is that the ques- 
tion be submitted to the voters of 
cities containing at least forty thous- 
and people. The latter appears to be 
the wiser method, since each city must 
bear the added cost of introducing 
the system and a large part of the 
opposition, both among fire officers 
and municipal authorities, is based on 
the increased outlay involved in the 
change. In any case, it is char beyond 
argument that two-plalobnUm is not a 
dead issue. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Firemen and Policemen. 



The following is an extract from an 
editorial discussion of the above sub- 
ject in the May American Magazine: 

"Why is it that nobody ever has a 
good word for policemen? Wherever 
you go, good policemen are always in 
the next town. New York praises 
Cleveland's police, and you believe it 
till you read the Cleveland papers. 
Cincinnati people tell you what a| 
splendid force they have in Detroit. 
Detroit tells you about St. Louis, St. 
Louis about Toledo. But go from one 
city to another and the citizens all say 
that the local force is no good and so 
it goes. 

"On the other hand they generally 
try to tell you that their fire depart- 
ment is better than others. They are 
proud of their firemen. You never 
hear specific charges like graft or in- 
efficiency brought against firemen. 
The general current estimate of the 
two branches of the service seems to 
rank firemen and policemen on two 
entirely different grades of character 
or levels of manhood. It is something 
like a light case of race prejudice. 
Everybody believes in firemen, and no 
one believes much in policemen. Fire- 
men are taken for granted as brave 
and manly, and policemen are always 
supposed to bear watching. Yet the 
two branches are recruited from ex- ; 
actly the same stock or grade or class 
or whatever you have a mind to call it; 
and they are picked for about the same 
run of qualifications." 

Judge Disapproves Firemen's Hours. 



Advocates of the two-platoon sys- 
tem for firemen will probably find 
support for their views in some ex- 
pressions contained in the judgment 
rendered last week granting a divorce 
to Fred W. Salisbury, a member of 
the Cleveland (0.) I'ire Department. 
Judge Pearson, in dismissing the 
wife's divorce petition and in grant- 
ing the cross-petition of the fireman, 
observed as follows: 

"Rules regulating the time firemen 
are required to be on duty should be 
changed. 

"Firemen should have more time to 
spend in their homes. 

"The rule of the department pre- 
venting firemen from having homes in 



the suburbs should be changed so that 
they could have the same privileges of 
living in the fresh air and sunshine 
that other city employes have." 

The Firemen's Relief and Pension 
Fund of San Diego has been organized 
with Superintendent of Fires A. E. 
Dodson, president; Fire Chief Louis 
Almgren, Jr., secretary, and City 
Treasurer Don M. Stewart, secretary- 
treasurer. The City Council voted to 
contribute $1,000, and $1 a month will 
be deducted from the salary of each 
fireman, and 50 cents a month from the 
salary of each call man, for the fund. 

George G. Chute, a fireman, and 
Chester A. Groat, an ex-fireman, both 
of Portland, have applied for patents 
on a device that will automatically 
start the engine of the auto fire truck, 
sound the alarm gong and turn on the 
lights in a station. The device is 
operated by simply pressing a button. 
A specimen has been installed in the 
Stark street station and works suc- 
cessfully. 

At Richmond, Cal., the new auto 
fire engine that has been bought for 
company 2 of the Richmond Fire De- 
partment is proving an effective piece 
of apparatus. More of this modern 
equipment is to be added. New hy- 
drants are being placed to improve 
the system. The council will spend a 
large sum of money in this direction. 

The people of Rosehurg, Ore., have 
rejected the bond issue of $15,000 for 
modern fire-fighting apparatus by a 
vote of 467 to 442; the levying of a 
1-mill tax with which to maintain 
a paid fire department, 445 to 443. 

Fire Chief Jas. Wilkinson of Pomona 
states that the present equipment of 
his department is inadequate. A new 
pumping engine and more hose is 
needed. 

Alcazar Theatre. 

"The Ne'ev-Do-Well,"Chas. Klein's 
dramatization of Rex Beach's famous 
tale of life in the Panama t anal zone, 
will he started on a w-ep'k's run next 
Monday evening in the Alcazar, with 
an extra Memorial Day matinee. Alice 
Fleming and Kernan Cripps are spe- 
cially engaged to lead a cast that em- 
braces the complete stock company 
and a number of extra people. In 



this play is finely preserved the spirit 
of adventure and romance that made 
Rex Beach's novel so popular. If the 
author of "The Music Master," and 
"The Lion and the Mouse" had aimed 
at putting a "bestseller" on the stage 
in such a way that it would convey 
just the same feelings created by the 
book, his success could not have been 
more thorough. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



THE best attention and service for the man who car- 
ries a HOWARD Watch-not on account of the 
watch, but because he 18 likely to be that kind 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does sug- 
gest a man who appreciates quality and is quite able to 
know whether he is getting it or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch Is fixed at the fac- 
tory and a printed ticket attached— from the 
17-jewel (double roller) in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at $40. to the 23- 
jewel at $150— and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. 

Admiral Stgsbee has written a little book. 

The Log of the Howard Watch.'" giving the 
record of his OJVIl Howard iti the B, S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card. Dept. N. 
and we'll send you a COM 

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Home phone S 2517 

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L. R1ZN1C Proprietor 

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PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Seagrave Motor Fire Apparatus in California 




GORHAM AUTOMOBILE FIRE ENGINE 



San Francisco, Cal., May 21, 1913. 
Editor Pacific Fireman. 

Dear Sir:— Very recently we signed a contract for the 51st Seagrave fire machine sold 
in California. We thought you would be interested in knowing this because it will give you 
some idea of the extent to which the California departments have been motorized. 

The Seagrave fire machines are generously scattered over the State from Redding on the 
north to San Diego. on the south, and none but good reports are being received from any of 
them. There are more Seagrave machines in service in this State than there are of all other 
makes combined. The most gratifying feature of our business is that the Seagrave cais have 
actually sold themselves ; that is to say, no Seagrave car has ever been purchased by any city 
without a careful investigation first being made of all other makes. 

A great many false reports are circulated very generously about Seagrave apparatus, but 
they have very little effect on the purchaser, because thorough investigation always disproves 
and dissipates them. 

I am sending you a cut of the first Gorham automobile fire engine. This was placed in 
service in the City of Oakland about one year ago. At the time it was placed in service it 
Was the largest auto fire engine in the world, and the only one of large capacity fitted with a 
Turbine pump. Since being placed in service it has given perfect satisfaction and successfully 
proven that it is in every respect superior to the steam fire engine. 

With best wishes, we remain 

Yours very truly, 

GORHAM FIRE APPARATUS COMPANY. 

By C. A. TABER. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all cheeks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2.00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 

continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Tele phone Franklin Mt',7. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908. at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



Battalion Chief O'Brien, a twenty-year 
veteran of the San Francisco Fire Depart- 
ment, was stricken with paralysis early 
Thursday morning. He has an application 
pending for retirement from the service, 
which will be heard at the next meeting of 
the Pension Board. 



A clipping from the San Mateo Leader of 
May 8 has reached us just as we go to press, 
highly commending the arrival of the 
American -La France auto chemical engine, 
recently purchased by the Hillsborough 
millionaire residents, but owing to lack of 
space is crowded out, but will appear in our 
next issue. 

Last week, at a meeting of Hillsborough's 
city fathers Fire Chief Walter Grant asked 
for assistance, stating that while he was 
willing to risk his life in a fire, he wanted at 
least an even break. After some discussion 
a resolution by City Trustee Knight was 
passed unanimously empowering the fire 
chief to call upon the police in case of emer- 
gency. 

At a meeting of the Public Health and 
Safety Commissioners of Sacramento, held 
last Monday, with Mayor Burke sitting as 
chairman, they awarded a contract to the 
Gorham Fire Apparatus Company for furnish- 
ing the fire department with a Gorham tur- 
bine pumping engine at a cost of $9,500. The 
Gorham people were given 120 days to make 
delivery. 

Judge Murasky was to have rendered a 
decision in the Maxwell case Thursday, but 
when court opened Charles Wesley Reed, 
through his client, President Walcott, re- 
quested permission to file a brief to show 
that the amendment which went into effect 
March 27, 1913. gives the Civil Service Com- 
mission discretionary power as to holding a 
physical test. Counsel for both sides agreed 
to the filing of the brief. 

Owing to the showing made by Chief Engi- 
neer Murphy, previous to the passage to 
print of the increased budget, he showed, to 
the satisfaction of the members of the con- 
ference that the high pressure system for fire 
protection was being neglected and was leak- 
ing at the rate of 190,000 gallons a day, there 



having been an increase in the leakage since 
May 6 of 50,000 gallons a day, the budget 
allowance was increased by $10,669 for 
manning the system properly. The budget 
will be finally passed a week from Monday. 

The Examiner of Thursday, commenting 
editorially on the delay of the Superior Court 
in handing down a decision in the Maxwell 
case, proceeds to settle the matter to its en- 
tire satisfaction, after which it takes the 
court to task by administering the following 
jolt: "When so simple a matter as the appro- 
priateness of requiring a sound body and good 
health in men called upon to take up the 
strenuous work of fire chief is in question it 
should not take a reasonable man long to 
come to a decision." And in a closing sen- 
tence says: "It is hard to see why any 
question ever arose about it." 

N. Y. Legislature Pass Two Platoon. 

New York State Legislature passes Malone 
bill providing for a two-platoon system for 
New York, Buffalo and Rochester. 

Notwithstanding the bitter antagonism of 
Commissioner Jos. Johnson and Chief Kenlon 
of New York, one of the last acts before ad- 
journment of the legislature was the passage 
of the two-platoon bill proposed by Senator 
John Malone of Buffalo. 

This happy culmination is the result of per- 
sistent and united effort on the part of the 
firemen of New York state. They were ably 
represented at Albany by Captain James D. 
Clifford, president of the Firemen's Mutual 
Benefit Association of New York; Captain 
Boore, president of the Dauntless Club of 
Buffalo; Frederick H. Cowles, a fire preven- 
tion expert and an ardent worker for better 
conditions for firemen, and by officers of the 
Firemen's Association of Rochester. 

The measure now needs only Governor 
Sulzer's signature to become a law, and the 
advocates of the bill claim that the Governor 
is favorable to legislation of this class. As 
the bill affects all first class cities of the state, 
it becomes a law if the governor signs it, the 
mayors of the several cities not having the 
power to veto, which they possess on bills 
affecting their cities alone. 

Captain Clifford regards the measure as 
important not only to New York, but to every 
state in the Union, as he believes that if the 
two-platoon system is established in the chief 
cities of the Empire State it will soon be 
adopted by fire departments of large munici- 
palities elsew here. 

Commissioner Joseph Johnson is urging the 
Governor io veto it. He says it will result 
in the complete demoralization of the de- 
partment. 

If twenty four hours of enforced absence 
fiom home and laniilv is necessary to avoid 
demoralizing the men of the New York de- 
partment, what is the state of the men em- 
ployed only eight hours a day in all other 
departments of municipal, state and federal 
irovernments? 



have formed an auxiliary and will conduct 
social affairs in the interest of the club. The 
object of the David Scannell Club is to protect 
Civil Service rights and to bring about better 
conditions generally; also to keep up the 
agitation for the two-platoon system in the 
department, which was defeated at last 
year's election. 

Increased Budget Passed to Print. 

At a meeting of the Supervisors Tuesday, 
notwithstanding the protests of Supervisors 
Jennings and Murphy and the other memberB 
of the FinanceCommittee, they passed to print 
the budget increasing the salaries of all city 
employes who asked for more pay, and even 
adding pay for some who did not ask it. 

A total of $52,849 was added to the annual 
appropriation, which will increase the tax 
levy 1 cent, raising the rate to $2.24, as 
against $2.09 this year. The total sum ap- 
propriated for the expenses of the city gov- 
ernment for the next fiscal year will be 
$14,275,082, as against $12,887,626 for 1912. 

Out of the above the fire department will 
receive $10,669 in order to properly mann the 
high pressure system. This sum was voted 
on the protest of Chief Engineer Murphy and 
the Fire Commissioners that the system could 
not be properly operated unless they were 
given what they thought to be necessory in 
the way of funds to carry on the work. 

On the statement of Chief Murphy at Mon- 
day's conference that it was utterly impossi- 
ble to properly run the department with nine 
battalion chiefs, $5,400 was added to the 
budget, thus retaining the present number of 
battalion chiefs. 

Veteran Firemen's Picnic. 

According to Captain Brown, chairman of 
the Committee of Arrangements, the annual 
picnic of the Veteran Firemen's Association, 
Sunday, May 25, atScheutzen Park, promises 
to be the biggest event ever held by the 
Vets. He reports the public have taken keen 
interest in the affair and states the committee 
experienced no trouble in disposing of more 
than the usual number of tickets. 

An athletic, musical and amusement pro- 
gramme will be carried out. Following are 
the committee in charge: 

Arrangements— George Brown, chairman; 
Thomas J. Coogan, secretary; John Murphy, 
Albert Leaf, Samuel McDowell. James Britt, 
Thomas Sands, William D. Waters. 

Amusements — Edward Gillig, chairman; 
Henry Reid, secretary; Samuel Baker, William 
Brown. Henr> Tricon, William Siewert, Rich- 
ard Cox, George Bridgewood, M. J. O'Connell, 
John Cains, Charles Healey, Rit hard Downing, 
Thoma- McLaughlin, William Conniff. Henry 
Casey, John Cahill, Sh'adrick Campbell, Frank 
Jordan. Frml. Ellenherper. Leo Costillo. 



The wives, sisters and mothers of the mem- 
bers of the recently organized Scannell Club 



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Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
May 23, we take the following excerpts from 
the Administrative Committee's report, which 
Was approved by the Board: 

From Battalion Chief Boden, reporting the 
suspension of John McCarthy, hoseman en- 
gine 29, for being under the influence of 
intoxicating liquor while on duty at the quar- 
ters of truck 8 on May 17. Charges filed. 

From W. H. Brown, machinist at the cor- 
poration yard, requesting that he be allowed 
salary for four days absent from duty during 
the month of April, 1913, on aecouivt of sick- 
ness. Granted. 

From Acting Battalion Chief Whitaker, 
submitting a complaint against Edward 
Carter, truckman truck 5, for addressing im- 
proper language to his superior officer, Capt. 
Otto, and for failing to respond to an alarm 
of fire with his company on May 6, 1913. 
After an investigation of this matter your 
committee recommend that Carter be dt- 
prived of one day's pay. 

The following members were granted leaves 
of absence: W. P. Delany, extension of time 
off with pay on account of sickness; Hugh 
Carr, 14 days; H. J. Anderson, 15 days with- 
out pay, commencing July 1; Captain Dugan, 
15 days without pay, commencing June 16; 
F. C. Gerlach, 30 days, on account of sick- 
ness, with permission to leave city. 

Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

From Thos. Muldowney, captain engine 2, 
complaining against the actions of Frank 
Smith, lieutenant of that company. 

From the testimony given in this case by 
Capt. Muldowney and Hosemen Witts, Re 
gan and Haynes, who testified in his favor, 
proved conclusively that Considerable es- 
trangement has existed between Lieut. Smith 
and Capt. 1 Muldowney and other members of 
the company for some time. Smith had no 
witnesses, wiih the exception of Battalion 
Chief Britt, but he might as well have intro- 
duced a dummy for all the aid or comfort 
he derived from the chief's testimony. 

As to the complaint of supplanting his 
Captain at fire, Smith admitted he might 
have been wrong, but denied all the other 
acrus;iiions made by (apt. Muldowney. 

At i he conelu-ion of the testimony Com- 
missioner Brandenstein stated he believed 
that the lieutenant was jMJ'lly of using in- 
sulting language to his captain, when ordered 
by him to brush up the dormitory which was 
<*o i rohora i ed by two wit n esses, Regan and 
Ibiwies, bill this Smith denied. The emu 
mi . .liner then moved he be allowed another 
bearing lo prove hi* innocence of the charge 
which was approved by tin- Board. 

At the close of the trial (';ipt. Muldowney 
sliited lo the Hoard that he thought Smith 
should make application for a transfer GO 
another company, in which the lieutenant 
virtually acquiesced, slating he did not dei ire 
to go back to the company OH account of the 
•trained relations between himself and (apt. 



Muldowney. The next hearing will take 
piece some evening next week at the call of 
the chair. 

Resolution requesting temporary appoint- 
ments for the month of June, 191:', where 
there are no civil service eligibles available. 
Approved. 

Pacific Coast Fire Chiefs' Convention. 



Seattle, Wash., May 10, 1913. 

Editor Pacific Fireman. 

The executive committee of the Pacific 
Coast Association of Fire Chiefs, acting with 
the Tacoma authorities, has fixed the dates 
fpr the twenty-first annual Convention as 
Monday, Tuesdav, Wednesday and Thursday 
of the last week in August, which will be the 
25th, 26th, 27th and 28th of that month. 

Preparations are being made that will in- 
sure a large and successful convention. Fur- 
ther notice will be sent by mail. 

The convention will be held at Tacoma, 
Washington. 

Respectfully yours, 

Harry W. Bringhitrst, Sec. 



Around the Bay Cities. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

The Civil Service examination for firemen 
in the Oakland Fire Department will be held 
June 15. The examination for stoker will 
also be held on the same date. Any male 
applicant between the age of 21 and 35 years, 
who has been a resident of Oakland for five 
years and is a citizen of the United States, is 
eligible for this test. Both physical and 
educational test will be given. 

Two firemen were seriously burned while 
fighting a fire in the home of Deputy Sheriff 
Reilly on the Redwood road, last week. C. 
Phaler, chauffeur for Chief Ball, and C. Sabero 
were burned about the face and hands while 
attempting to extinguish a blaze in the build- 
ing. The fire started from a defective flue 
and the loss is estimated at $1500. 

Charges have been made by Prof. Lewis of 
the University of California, that the recent 
fire that, destroyed the Rowe residence in 
Berkeley gained great headway because the 
water company had the hydrant shut off. 
The water company denies this and claims 
the hydrant was at fault. Commissioner 
Hoff will investigate the charges. 

Councilman Stewart introduced a resolution 
at the meeting of the Alameda City Council 
Wednesday night to investigate the charges 
of Fire Commissioner Hynos that the depart- 
ment is out of date, the houses old and the 
apparatus inefficient . 

The Alameda Council has appointed K .1. 
Bevan Police and Fire Commissioner, to 
succeed Frank Smith, whose term expired. 

From the present Btate of affairs it looks 
as though Chief Steinmetz will not gel the 
machine thai the old council promised him. 
The chief's auto was made part of the plat 
form of the present administration, and judfi 
ing from the action at Wednesday night 's 

t -ting, the chief will be forced to do with- 
out the auto. The Police and Fire Commie 
sioners ordered the machine Borne time ago 



but did not complete the final arrangements 
until after the election. The car is now ready 
for delivery. 

To Cross Bats with Healdsburg Nine. 

The members of the fire department have 
the base ball germ in their system, and the 
only way to effect a cure for the disease is to 
get a number of them who are inoculated 
with the germ to play a real live base ball 
game. Now Ed. Shea and J. Walsh, seeing 
the condition of their brother members, have 
arranged a game with the Healdsburg team 
on the 1st of June. And in anticipation of a 
hard game, they havebeen practicing on their 
days off at Golden Gate Park. 

A number of the boys were there last Sat- 
urday afternoon and with the "pep" they 
displayed the Healdsburgers had better look 
out for their honors. Tom Buckley was there 
and was putting the boys through a number 
of up-to-date base ball stunts, such as the hit 
and run, the hook slide, the double steal and 
a number of other things in modern baseball, 
when rain interfered and the boys beat it for 
cover; not that they were afraid of getting 
wet, as that is in their line of business, but 
someone suggested it was bad foi the salary 
arm and it would be simply out of the ques- 
tion to have any one of the stars injured when 
so important a game was on. 

Arrangements are now being made and 
those who have consented to make the trip 
and take part in the game are the following: 
. Ed. Shea, engine 33; P. Moholy, engine 11; 
Jesse Loh, engine 17; Ed. Comber, engine 20; 
Jas. Walsh, engine 38; J". Gavin, engine 31; 
F. Hughes, engine 23; S. Hackett, engine 34; 
A. Robertson, engine 31; C. Brennan, truck 4; 
E. Linderberg, truck 4; T. Buckley, corpora- 
tion yard; Ham Iberg, corporation yard; Bill 
Parry, operator. 

Members on their day off and looking for 
an outing are extended an invitation to make 
the trip. All are welcome. 

At Kansas City, recently, the people, bv a 
vote of 16,610 to 4,618, adopted the two- 
platoon system for its fire department, to go 
into operation January 1, 1914. This is the 
second city to vote for that system, theother, 
Seattle. Wash., putting it into effect on April 
1. Two other cities now have it. Omaha, 
Neb. and Kansas City, Mo. Several state 
legislatures, including Massachusetts, have 
this year defeated bills for its adoption, and 
oii er bills are now pending in two or three 
legislatures. 

Chief J. E. Nygren, Beloit, Wis., has 
recommended to the aldermen that the 
two-platoon system be put into force 
in the lii-f department 



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MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
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Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



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To Rkach Nurseiues. take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

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Marine View Terrace 

(THE PIEDMONT OF RICHMOND) 
DON'T" 

let this opportunity pass by. This is absolutely 
yout last chance to get close in property at such 
prices and terms. 

Only seven minutes walk from the 
City Hall. Ashland Avenue will reach 
Marine View Terrace through the municipal 
tunnel and continue on through the entire length 
of the property to the new ferry from which boats 
will run regularly to and from San Francisco. 

Bonds have been sold and the money is 
now in the hands of the City Trepsurir for the 
immediate construction of these irr.i roverrents 
and values will double and treble in a very 
short time. 

Don't delay — buy now instead of 
wishing you had later on. 

For maps or further information, see or write 

WENHAM & PAUL 



1444 San Pablo Ave., 



Oakland, California 




VOL. X.-NO. 28 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MAY 31, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Hillsborough's Motor Chemical Engine. 

The San Mateo Leader of May 8, dis- 
cussing- the arrival of Hillsborough's 
new motor chemical fire engine re- 
cently had the following to say of it: 

The American-La France combina- 
tion chemical and hose fire apparatus 
has arrived. It is a handsome ma- 
chine of which our millionaire neigh- 
bors may well feel proud. 

At a meeting of the City Board last 
Tuesday evening a resolution was 
passed to the effect that should San 
Mateo or Burlingame have occasion to 
call upon the Hillsborough fire depart- 
ment and this auto-chemical apparatus 
a cheerful and ready response should 
be made to the call. 

One peculiarity about this new ma- 
chine is a little enclosed space with a 
door on the side, which aroused the 
suspicions of President Brewer, but 
when it was opened only showed some 
extra hose (fire hose). It looks like a 
handy place for cool things— cham- 
pagne for millionaire fire lighters, for 
instance. 

Any hopes that Walter Hohart or 
any other clubmen might have had to 
be chief of the new Hillsborough vol- 
unteer fire department were officially 
dispelled when the Board of Trustees 
app tinted Walter A. Grant, a profes- 
sional fire fighter, as chief. Grant will 
also drive the new auto chemical. It 
was suggested thai a volunteer fire 
company he organized among the mil- 
lionaire residents and that nam I lily fire 
drills be held. 

With the arrival of the new appara- 
tus the Hillsborough Trustees have 
taken occasion to express their grati- 



tude to the sister cities of San Mateo 
and Burlingame, whose volunteer fire- 
men have protected Hillsborough. 

The Seagrave Pumping Engine. 

The year has been signalized in this 
company's history by the production 
of the new motor pumping engine. 
This pump is of the multiple-stage 
turbine type and is the first one of this 
type of pump to be used in fire depart- 
ment service. This type of pump is 
being used in practically every other 
line of business where pumps are re- 
quired, but not until the Seagrave 
Company had presented it to the pub- 
lic has there been one used in fire de- 
partment work. Six of these pumps 
have been sold to Los Angeles, four 
to San Diego, one to Visalia, one to 
Pasadena, one to Oakland, fine to 
Columbus, Ohio, and one to Sacra- 
mento. 

This pump is made in 700 and 1,000 
gallon capacity. The particular fea- 
ture of it is the efficiency and the flexi- 
bility, it being possible to shut off any 
and all lines of hose at the same time 
without stalling the motor or causing 
complications in the way of using re- 
lief valves, turn valves, etc. 

This firm is also bringing out a 
piston valve motor which opens and 
closes the ports at the proper time 
and seals the purls by means of a valve 
having rings the same as the rings on 
the big piston in the main cylinder of 
the motor. By the use of this piston 
valve motor all cams and valve 
lifter guides, springs for closing the 
valves, etc., are eliminated. The 
piston valve throttles only one lair as 

fast as the big piston in the cylinder, 



hence the wear is reduced to a mini- 
mum. In other words, when the large 
piston is traveling 64 inches the valve 
pistons are only traveling 16. 

Los Angeles. 

The Los Angeles Budget Committee, 
says the Underwriters' Report, has 
rendered to Fire Chief Eley, the Ma J or 
and members of the Fire Commission 
the ultimatum that not more than a 7 
per cent increase over last year's ap- 
propriation for the fire department 
can be made. 

As a result of this, not more than 
$50,000 will be to hand for the exten- 
sion of the service through the 107 
square miles of the city. Members of 
the Budget Committee and City Coun- 
cil are agreeing with Fire Chief Eley 
that the only way to meet the city 's 
needs is by making a new bond issue 
to the extent of $350,000 or $500,01 0, 
while Councilman McKenzieis urging 
$1,000,000. 

The need of the city acquiring the 
small water . systems and | lacing thtm 
under the control of the city water 
department, the elin inaiitn oi ile 
$15,000 or more expense now paid in 
rentals to private companies fi i v atcr 
and fire hydrant service and the 
utilizing of future city a| propriatii is 
for the maintenance of the i \| anding 
fire department are some of the fea* 
tu res of i he si lua i ion which have h' en 
recognizt d. 

The lend between the Taunton, 
Mass. police and fire departments is 
at an end. The police w i i p dii pi un- 
tied because i he fit i n en op] est <i the 

pension bill, and I he lireiih n 
cause the polici n < n did 1 1 e .-an e to 
the one-day-oll m-live bill. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Want More Drills and Practice. 



Owing to the recent result of fires 
in Sacramento Fire Chief Anderson 
and his department has been subj ected 
to some sharp criticism by the mer- 
chants. They claim there should be 
more practice and fire drills. Chief 
Anderson states that the lack of fire 
apparatus and the necessity of keep- 
ing all that is at present available in 
constant readiness has prevented his 
allowing the same for practice or 
drilling purposes. It is probable the 
city will purchase more fire apparatus. 

Portland, Ore., has received a new 
American-La France auto pumping 
engine and also a La France auto com- 
bination hose and chemical wagon, the 
latter being the fourth of its kind to 
be received. The auto pumping en- 
gine was put through a series of tests. 
The volume of water delivered under 
the required pressure, requiring the 
pumping of water to a height of nine 
stories, and the speed of the engine 
on some of the steep and level grades 
of the city, were some of the tests. 

A school for Cincinnati, O., fire 
chauffeurs was opened last week at 
engine company 45, to instruct fire- 
men in the operation of the new com- 
bination chemical engines and hose 
car which will soon be put in service. 
Fifty firemen from the various engine 
houses have been registered and they 
will be divided into three classes. It 
is the intention of Safety Director 
Cash to devote three days each week 
to instruction work. 



James J. Rowley, lieutenant of en- 
gine company 5, and John Dooley 
driver of engine company 96, have 
been elected trustees of the Chicago 
Firemen's Pension Fund. Rowley re- 
ceived 965 votes and Dooley 976. 
$268,505.17 was paid out in pensions 
from January 1, 1912, to December 
31. 1912. 

The movement to raise the salary of 
all Detroit, Mich., firemen $100 a year 
is maeting opposition. 



R0SENBLIM4BRAHAM CO. Inc. 

TAILORS POR JVIEIN 

IIOS MARKET SX. 

ODD FELLOWS BUILDING 

Phone M.ikei 1503 

UNIFORMS OUR SPECIALTY UNION LABEL USED 



The Berkeley City Council is con- 
sidering the advisability of calling a 
bond election for establishing a high 
pressure water system for adequate 
fire protection. Two reservoirs of 
100,000,000 gallons capacity each are 

proposed. 

Alcazar Theatre. 

There is no finer war play than "The 
Heart of Maryland," which is to be 
revived next Monday night and 
throughout the week at the Alcazar, 
with Alice Fleming and Kernan Cripps 
leading an augmented company. Writ- 
ten by David Belasco, it reveals in 
abundance the wizardry of the stage- 
craft. Viewed from an angle, it defies 
detection of imperfect workmanship. 
Its story was ingeniously conceived 
and is interestingly unfolded, afford- 
ing opportunities for effective acting 
by almost every person in the cast 
and enabling the scenic artists and 
mechanics to invest their best talents 
in the construction of inanimate ac- 
cessories. To all of which may be 
attributed its retention of popularity 
long after many plays with similar 
theme have been permanently retired. 
When last presented in the Alcazar. 
about five years ago, "The Heart of 
Maryland"exceeded the management's 
most sanguine expectation by exceed- 
ing a fortnight run, and that it will 
be witnessed by crowded audiences 
during its revival is certain, for spe- 
cial inducement to attend is offered to 
all who wear or have worn Uncle Sam's 
military or naval uniform. 

Empress Theatre. 

Frank Stafford, assi-ted by Mis* 
Marie Stone will headline the new bill 
at the Empress Sunday afternoon, 
presenting a novel nature idyl, enti- 
tled "A Hunter's Game." "Rox" 
and "Don" English, the Irish setters, 
are introduced in this act. Another 
spectacular feature will be Bothwell 
Brown, in a pantomimic dancing pro- 
duction of the historical death of 
Cleopatra, entitled "The Serpent of 
the Nile." Mr. Ernest Young and a 
ballet of twelvedancing girls make up 
the company. The monologue that 
made Al Herman famous in vaudeville 
in less than a year is the third fea- 
ture. Sidney Broughton and Grace 
Turner, former favorites of "The Red 



Rose," "The Gypsy" and "The Prince 
of Pilsen" will present "Just Landed," 
a tuneful oddity. Moffat-La Reine 
Company, human dynamos, offer an 
exhibition of power over electricity. 
More comedy will be served by W. C. 
Hoefler, the cycling clown, who makes 
fun on a bicycle that will not behave. 
Lillian Holmes, a cultured contralto, 
will make her debut in vaudeville. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



THE best attention and service for the man who car- 
ries a HOWARD Watch-not on account of the 
watch, but because he is likely to be that kio-i 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does stlg- 
iresl a man who appreciates quality and is quite able to 
know whether he is getting it or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD W r atch. 
Find the lloWAIill jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 

pay for it. 

The price of each watch Is fixed at the fac- 

,,,,1 a printed ticket attached— from the 

17-jewel 'double roller' C ent Extra or 

BOSS Extra gold-filled I ISC "I ?<". to tile 23- 

r fl50 and the Edward Howard model 
ii (350 
Udmiral Sigsbee has written a little book, 

"The Log of II"' Howard Watch," giving the 

,, i of Ms own Howard In the T S. Navy. 

you'll enjoy it. Drop its i st-card, Dept N. 

and we'll semi you a copy. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boiton. Mas. 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZN1C Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDEKWBAR A SPECIALTY 
2>06-y8 GEARY STREET 

Near Brodtrick 
Telephone We., 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



THE 

TRIPP REMEDY COMPANY 

POSITIVELY CURES 

Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh. Rheumatism. 

Goitre. Tumorous Growths, Malaria, 

Erysipelas, Scrofula, Lupus, 

Tuberbular-Glands, 

Joints and all Blood Diseases 

479 TURK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 







PACIFIC FIREMAN 


3 




When You're Buyin 9 Oil 






buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 






Jc|j2_-- 


to your motor (and your purse) to jig^fT_^ 




nil 


y feed it the best lubricant money ffjfmijji 




RJPLTKtirjlH 


1 can buy pill 






&3m 


1 unless, of course, you are married Kjli&y 






to the repair man. e^^sBgf 






But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 






good oil, say 






PANHARD OIL 






BERNARD 1. BILL. 






Sole Distributor for the Pacific Coast 543 Oolden date Ave., Fan Francisco 











PACIFIC FIREMAN 



P 



•acifi 




IREMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

J AS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance LOO 

Six months . 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially larjreand 

continuous ones 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 2L 1908, nl the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act nf Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



The further hearing of Lieut. Smith's case 
is scheduled to come up before the Board at 
the call of the chair next week. 



We regret to announce that upon the re- 
commendations of Commissioner Johnson and 
Chief Kenlon. that the Malone hill, which was 
passed by the New York legislature, granting 
the two- platoon system to the firemen of New 
York city and other cities of that state, has 
been vetoed by Governor Sulzer. 

The Civil Service Commission, following 
the decision of Judge Murasky in upholding 
the elimination of the physical test, examina- 
tions for promotions from battalion chief to 
assistant chief in the department will be held 
along about the first of July, as one or two 
of the chiefs take their vacations about the 
loth of June. 



purpose in small villages and small towns and 
at firemen's conventions. In fact, many a 
city has discontinued the annual parade of its 
force because it has felt that such a demon- 
stration is rather rural and unbecoming to 
the rank, dignity and statureof a full-fledged 
city or large town. " 

W. J. Mathison of engine 35, who was sus- 
pended for one year for being under the in- 
fluence of liquor and failing to respond to an 
alarm with his company, appeared before the 
Board Thursday. When the box came in 
Mathison was asleep on the table, and Capt. 

W is being unable to awake him, after 

shaking him, was compelled to respond to box 
without him. When the company returned, 
after an absence of an hour and a half, 
Mathison was still asleep. Commissioner 
Brandenstein, owing to Mathison's bad rec- 
ord, suggested that he be dismissed from 
the department, but after some discussion 
and a plea for leniency by President Hammer 
and a promise from Mathison to make good 
if given a last chance, it was so ordered. 
Upon Chief Murphy staling that there being 
no vacancy, Mathison would have to wait a 
few days before being assigned. It was i 
the sense of the Board that he again enter, 
the service as a probationary member, and 
upon any violations of the rules that he be 
dismissed from the department. 

Politics Barred. 



over examinations for promotions. 

Maxwell brought suit alleging that his posi- 
tion might be filled by a man who was physi- 
cally incapable of attending to his duties. A 
temporary injunction was issued and the ex- 
amination which was scheduled for two months 
ago has never taken place. 

Judge Murasky hold that the Board of Civil 
Servict Commissioners is a power unto itself 
and that the courts have no jurisdiction to in- 
terfere in its work. 

The judge also says that in his interpreta- 
tion of the city charter it is mandatory for an 
applicant for an original appointment to any 
branch of the city government to take an ex- 
amination as to his physical qualifications. 

In cases, however, where the man is al- 
ready a member of one of the city depart- 
ments and is to take an examination for pro- 
motion in that department it is wholly within 
the discretion of the Civil Service Commis- 
sioners whether he shall again pass a physi- 
cal test. 



Jerry Collins, who was recently promoted 
to captaincy in the department and assigned 
to engine company 29, the Civil Service Com- 
mission has decided that he must relinquish 
the position as Chief Murphy's operator for 
which he is at present drawing a salary of 
$125, if he desires to receive a captain's 
salary of $155. 

Chief Murphy, speaking of men charged 
with being addicted to using liquor while on 
duty, stated that many good men get their 
skins full of liquor, but use good sense and 
judgment in not allowing it to interfere with 
their business. Supposing we had many 
members in the department like McCarthy 
and Mathison. what would become of the 
lives in the Webster street fire. I would 
rather see house after house go up in flames 
than know 'hat one human being perished or 
in any way maimed through the neglect of 
the department in rescuing them. 

The Fireman's Herald of May 14, editorially 
commenting on New York's municipal em- 
ployes' parade, especially the part firemen 
and fire apparatus played in it, says: "Many 
persons who usually know what they are 
talking about say that public parades of fire- 
men and apparatus in large cities are out of 
place. That sort of thing, they say, was all 
very well years ago, and still serves a useful 



According to an order issued by Chief Eley 
of the Los Angeles Fire Department, any 
member of the department found guilty of 
political activity during the present campaign 
will be subject to summary dismissal from 
the service. 

In his order the chief says: "You are hereby 
notified that you must refrain from any poli- 
tical activity. You will bearin mind that you 
are paid by the taxpayers of this city to pro- 
tect life and property, and not to do politics. 
Political activity on the part of members of 
the department only engenders bad feeling 
and destroys the efficiency and discipline of 
the department, and the public suffers in con- 
sequence. Such action on your part is also 
contrary to Section 8 of Rule 7 of the Civil 
Service rules and regulations, under which 
you were appointed. It is not the intention 
of this order to interfere wiih your rights as 
an American citizen to vote for whom you 
please, nor does ii prevent you talking to any 
candidate for political office, but it does pre- 
vent you being active in politics. Any mem- 
ber found guilty of violating this order will 
be subject to summary dismissal from the 
department. " 



Civil Service Commission Wins Out. 

According to a decision handed down by 
Judge Murasky of the Superior Court last 
Friday in the John R. Maxwell case, who en- 
joined the Civil Service Commission from 
holding an examination for first and second 
fiiv chief engineers in the fire department, 
without a competitive physical test, the Civil 
Service Board has full discretionary powers 



Test of American-La France Auto Engines 

In the test of the two American-La France 
motor chemical fire engines, held Saturday, 
May 24, barring an accident to the carburetor 
of one of the machines which took fire while 
ascending the California-street hill, between 
Stockton and Powell streets, and had it not 
been for the presence of mind of Sam 
Makowitz. driver of chemical company 3, 
would undoubtedly have been more serious, 
but Makowitz exlinguishea it and in doing so 
risked being very badly burned, otherwise 
both machines more than met all require- 
ments of Fire Commissioners Hammer, Dillon 
and Pfaeffle, Chief Engineer Murphy, Super- 
intendent of Engines Bermingham and R. S. 
Chapman, Manager Altizer of the American 
La France Fire Engine Company of Cali- 
fornia, besides many other gentlemen inter- 
ested in fire department affairs. 

The second machine went through without 
any mishap and showed excellent endurance 
and speed in climbing the steep hills. The 
requirements of the department for motor 
fire apparatus are most severe, owing to the 
steep grades of some of the city streets, that 
only the most approved motor apparatus can 
be successfully used by the department. 

After the speed test of the hills a run was 
made out to Golden Gate Park and the ocean 
boulevard. On some of the easy grades on 
Haight street it is said forty-five miles an 
hour was attained, and on level thoroughfares 
a speed of fifty miles was easily maintained. 

Owing to the accident to the first machine, 
before it can be accepted by the department, 
it will be necessary that another test take 
place, but we have not been apprised of 
the date. 



Webster Street Fire. 



Captain Sewell took photographs from 
every angle of the fire at 1328 Webster street 
Tuesday, which were on display at the meet- 
ing of the Board Thursday morning, in which 
Patrolmen H. W. Levy and T. M. Hyland 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



distinguished themselves in saving the life of 
Mrs. Anna Sehaffer, at the risk of being 
nearly suffocated from the blinding smoke. 
Emma, Grace and Irving Inez, children, were 
overcome by smoke. Sydney Inez, aged 8, 
was overlooked in the excitement and was 
found sleeping. He was restored to his 
frantic parents. 

Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
May 29, we take the following excerpts from 
the Administrative Committee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From Wm. Jeffers, engine 20, requesting an 
extension of time on his leave of absence, on 
account of sickness. Granted. 

From the Board of Public Works, stating 
that Consulting Architects have been directed 
to prepare specifications and plans for engine 
house at Twenty - second and Wisconsin 
streets; also Class "C" building at Southwest 
corner of Drumm and Commercial streets. 
Filed. 

From the Board of Public Works, stating 
that thev have requested an opinion from the 
City Attorney regarding the responsibility of 
the Board to repair the damage to the high 
pressure system on O'Farrell street, between 
Stockton and Powell, on April 29, 1913, occa- 
sioned by cave-in. Filed. 

From J. B. Cane, driver chemical 8, re- 
questing that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for two weeks, without pay, commenc- 
ing June 1. Granted. 

From John Bohan, stoker engine 19, re- 
questing that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence, without pay, from June 17 to July 1. 
Denied, as too many previous applications 
have been granted for the period applied for, 
and that Mr. Bohan be advised by letter to 
that effect. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the Board of Public Works be requested 
to have, the crown of the grade reduced on 
the northern side of the hill on Union street 
al Leavenworth. Approved. 

Prom the chief engineer, recommending 
that the proper authorities be requested to 
have gas mains installed in the vicinity of 
engine 47, so thai that company may have 
gas service. Recommend be approved, and 
gas company be requested to give immediate 
attention to the matter. 

Authorization I or t he purchase of one 2 hour 
Dreager helmet complete, $140; one extra 
cylinder for same, $15; six extra cartridges 
at$l. 80 each, $10.80. Total $165.80. Authori- 
sation for purchase granted. 

I'' rein flunk Bacigalupi, thanking the de- 
partment for the installation of a tin- hydrant 
ai ( leary and Collins si roots. Filed. 

From I). R. Sewell, captain engine 80, en- 
closing letter from Hirseh & Kaiser, giving 
prices on photographic material and supplies, 
htkI asking that same be purchased for use in 
t he department. Authorization given for the 
purchase of one Graflt x camera, $110; 5 v. 7 
Voighi lander holier lens, $90. andonedozen 
plate holders, $15. Total, $215. 

From the San Bruno Av. one Improvement 



Club, expressing their appreciation of the 
promptness and zeal of members of this de- 
partment in extinguishing fire at Harrison 
Primary School on May 12. Filed. 

From the chief engineer, submitting a list 
of probationary members who have been 
satisfactorily passed upon at the school of in- 
struction and the drill tower. Filed. 

From the chief engineer, recommendation 
for installation of fire alarm box 834 at Edin- 
burgh and Avalon streets in the Excelsior 
Homestead District. Approved- 
Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

From Jas. Bohan, stoker engine 19, re- 
questing a leave of absence, without pay, 
from June 1st to June 15th, on account of 
business. Granted. 

From T. J. Harrington, lieutenant truck 5, 
requesting a further leave of absence, with 
permission to remain in the country, on ac- 
count of illness. Granted 30 days. 

From the chief engineer, reporting the 
number of pieces of motor-driven apparatus 
in the department and location of same; also 
list of apparatus contracted for. Filed. 

Receiving of bids for dry-docking, painting 
and general repairs to fireboat David Scanned, 
in accordance with resolution passed by the I 
Board May 16, 1913. Awarded to Union Iron < 
Works for $1046. 

From the Civil Service Commission, au- 
thorizing temporary appointments for the 
month of June. Filed. 

Trial of John F. McCarthy, hoseman engine 
29, for being under the influence of intoxicat- 
ing liquor while on duty May 17. 

McCarthy, upon appearing before the Board 
Thursday, admitted that he was guilty as 
charged. Commissioner Brandensteiu asked 
him if he had anything to say why the penalty 
of six months' suspension should not be car- 
ried out. Upon receiving a negative reply, 
the commissioner turned to Battalion Chief 
Boden and asked him what he would suggest 
in the matter. The chief stated, in answer 
to the commissioner that McCarthy resign 
Irom the department, as he had talked and 
advised him to entirely refrain from liquor on 
numerous occasions to no avail and considered 
it a hopeless case. When asked if lien' were 
no mitigating circumstances I'.oden said there 
might, after which McCarthy's record was 
produced, when il was found that this was 
his fourth appearance before the Board. At 
this juncture President Hammer came to 
McCarthy's assistance with a humatarian 
plea for the mmi's wile and children, who 
were depending upon him for their support, 

requesting that he lie given one more chiinre 
to retrieve; thai he he mil dismissed, hut that 
Ilia suspension should dale from day of his 
suspension by Battalion Chief Boden for six 
months; also that he should report to Boden 
monthly as lo hi- good behavior in refraining 

from intoxicating liquor, while tl hief in 

turn will report to thit Board n Ihly al o, 

which was approved by the Board. 

Subscribe lor the I'm hi. I'iki m \v 



The Veteran Firemen's Picnic. 



The Veteran Firemen's Association of San 
Francisco held its 14th annual picnic and re- 
union Sunday, May 25, at Scheutzen Park. 
The veterans and their friends, numbering 
about 2000, participated. It was a grand 
success socially and financially. 

The day was ideal, and those assembled tried 
to outvie the weather, and not a single hap- 
pening occurred to mar the pleasure of the 
day. The boat and train service was up to the 
regular standard, about 500 arriving at the 
park by the forenoon trains, but the crowds 
swarmed in in the afternoon. 

The morning was occupied in going the 
rounds of the party renewing and reviving 
old acquaintances. After luncheon was par- 
taken of, dancing was indulged in to the 
strains of splendid music, and during the 
afternoon games for old and young were run, 
three prizes being awarded to the winners of 
each event; there were running races for boys 
and girls, 12 years and under, young men and 
young ladies, fat men and fat women, old 
men and old ladies, married men and married 
ladies, members ana members' wives, also 
free-for-all races. The sports were some- 
thing out of the ordinary. 

The committee in charge of the races were: 
Past President W. H. Williams, judge; ex- 
Battalion Chief Harry Horn, starter; Com- 
rades D. J. Harrison and Capt. W. J. Ken- 
neally of engine 14, time keepers. 

President A. C. McKenzie and his estimable 
wife, with others of her lady friends, enter- 
tained handsomely, serving an elegant lunch, 
both solid and liquid. The special guests 
were Past Presidents Baker and Williams. 

We also noticed among the guests ex-Chief 
P. H. Shaughnessy and ex-Assistant Chief E. 
F. McKittrick. 

A very elaborate programme was gotten up 
for the occasion and distributed to each per- 
son entering the gate. Everybody enjoyed 
themselves highly, the time for home 
coming by far too early. 

The affair, we understand, war. the best 
ever held under the auspices of the as 
tion, and the various committees deserve 
great credit for their untiring efforts in mak- 
ing the 14th annual outing such an eminent 
success. 

Captain Curran of engine !' is making 
elaborate preparations for a big rich Mulligan 
stew . He is stuffing several big buck rabbits 
lor tie- occasion. Every morning when he 
goes out h. feed tl" m the bucks cannot 
derstand why all this tine barlej and other 
good ilnnus w huh ral hits i!. light lu n 
The captain believes I he) Bl e I" gil llina to 
ej i' him with suspicion The) I ;n e I" cue i,, 
think he has evil designs ot ihem i I ■ 
for the I. ic festival w ill he dulj tnni in i ■ 
i i.-v b can in. do an i i ioi > lor a 

t o\ ;i I f. i 



i. Dona!*, I2SS 

U. J. BORCK, m. IA...OK 

\i \kt - \ -ft i i \t n ui 
PIRBMBN'S UNIFORMS 

FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET Sin I ran 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



M 



American -La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIR 



APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to It', dding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Ett. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Rkach NllRBEiclBS, take Castro street car In 28rd, M 

Mission. 24th street iind Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



p. n „ > Doutrlas 49J4 
^""f Home C 2842 






I W«t . 566 

I HomeS 3174 



Phone Merrill 4447 



LOTS $150 



$150 LOTS 



H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue, Oakland 



EASY TERMS 



IIN 



\A/M. F. EIGAN 



Marine View Terrace 

(THE PIEDMONT OF RICHMOND) 



M. R. C. V. S. 

. VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D. 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cn\ 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 



21 10-21 14 FILLMORE STREET 



Phone Dousl.s 4716 



Home C 2458 



112 S. Spring Si. 
Los Angeles 



717 K Street 
Sactamenlo 



EAGLESON & CO. 

Importers and Manufacturers 

MENS FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 
I I IB MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 



Phone Market 5417 



DON'T 

let this opportunity pass by. This is absolutely 
your last chance to get close in property at such 
prices and terms. 

Only seven minutes walk from the 
City Hall. Ashland Avenue will rtach 
A 1\ /T A \. T I - " - ! - " O T~> /"\ O Marine View Terrace through themumcipal 
r\ I V I r\ l\l I* i DIyvJ^ tunnel and continue on thrc ufch the entire l< ngth 

of the property to the new terry from which boats 
will run regularly to and from San Francisco. 

Bonds have been sold and the money is 

now in the hands of the City Treasurer fcr the 

immediate construction ol these imcrovenfr's 

- and values will double and treble in a veiy 

Home C 4992 sn0 rt time. 

Don't delay buy now instead of 
wishing you had later on. 

For maps or further information, see or write 

WENHAM & PAUL 

1444 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, California 



HATS, t'NDKRWKAK. ETC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 267 I 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 



630 KEARINV STRKET 

SAN FRANCISCO COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 




VOL. X.-NO. 29 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Stockton's Antiquated Fire Apparatus. 

A Stockton paper of recent date, 
speaking of the fire-fighting equip- 
ment of that city, says: "The Mer- 
chants' Association has protested to 
the City Council against the ancient 
fire- fighting equipment used. The 
whole truth ahout that pile of junk on 
wheels, officially known as fire equip- 
ment, has never heen told, but Chief 
Murphy has said that his men have 
cause to be afraid to build fires in the 
engines, as they are old and danger- 
ous and may blow up at any moment. 
Chief Murphy further said tl at if he 
had his way ahout it he would dump 
them in I he slough and the fire depart- 
in 'til would be wpII rid of a menace. 
The council is not to blame for the 
condition of the fire equipment, but 
it will be unless the city is giyen an 
opportunity to vote bonds so that 
adequate equipment may he secured. 
If the bonds are defeated, then the 
council will be absolved and the citi- 
zens will have to endure the risks that 
Stockton inns from fire. This city has 
been particularly fortunate that the 
business district has not been wiped 
out. A little blaze and a high wind 
and all that the bravest fire laddies 
and ablest child' could do would not 
Stop the conflagration. Stockton is in 
danger, and (he Merchants' Associa- 
tion l.-is done well to again call atten- 
tion to thai fact. " 

Firemen Probe Urged. 

A grand jury investigation of the 
finances and methods of the Firemen's 
Benevolent Asseciation of New York 
city has I n sought by Fire Commis- 
sioner Johnson in a letter addressed 



to District Attorney Whitman. Ap- 
pended thereto was a statement by 
Walter Duggan, a fireman and mem- 
ber of the organization, that while its 
officials announced recently that there 
was a balance of $93,000 in the treas- 
ury, he estimates that the balance 
should be $243,000. How the money 
has been spent is what the commis- 
sioner would like to know. The two- 
platoon bill, recently passed by the 
legislature, was supported by the 
association. There is a city ordinance 
prohibiting any member of the uni- 
formed force from contributing to any 
political fund. 

At last, week's meeting of the Los 
Angeles Fire Commission Chief Eley 
was reappointed by the Mayor. He 
was given a leave of absence for one 
year, which he will take under the 
heading of a captain in order to secure 
his civil service standing. While on 
his leave of absence, the chief will 
attend the convention of the Interna- 
tional Fire Engineers, which will he 
held at New York next September. 
The Fire Commission has recom- 
mended to the City Council that an 
appropriation of $3f he granted him 
for the expenses of his trip to .New 
York, and while there he will make a 
strong bid to secure the International 
Fire Engineers' convention for Los 

Angeles in 1915. 

While practicing in the street was 
being held by engine company 20 of 
Los Angeles, the firemen lost control 
of t he hose and a se\ i re accidei i re- 
sulted to Glen Knabenshue, residing 
at 1 12 Nort h I [arvard houlei at d, w ho 
was observing operations. He suf- 
lerred a broken leg as a result of the 
hose striking him, 



A Poor Opinion of Jerusalem. 

Fire Commissioner Sidney T. Man- 
ning of Baltimore has just returned 
from a tour of Europe, and from his 
opinion of the city of Jerusalem it 
must be a very dirty place. "I will 
knock the block off the first man who 
again attempts to sing to me 'Jerusa- 
lem, the Golden.'" He meant the 
earthly Jeruusalem, and said Commis- 
sioner of Street Cleaning Larkins 
would need 1,000 men and carts a day 
to clean up the streets and make them 
look like the streets of Baltimore. 
Commissioner Manning saw many 
things that interested him, but wl at 
he talked about most was a drill of the 
London Fire Department, which he 
witnessed at Southwark. His com- 
ment was that London seemed to pay 
particular attention to the soldiery 
appearance and drill of its firemen. 
The engines, he said, were lighter 
than those of the Baltimore depart- 
ment. At the same time he did not 
seem to think that the apparatus here 
would be suitable to London, the street 
conditions being diffen nt there, Mr. 
Manning said that London had forty 
motor engines and was going to 1 uy 
more. The drill he saw was a regular 
Wednesday drill of the department. 
"I saw no people, country or place 
that suited me as well as n \ own." 

W. F. Nelson, member, aof t] efire 
department of Memphis. Tenn., died 
a few daj s ago from lockjaw resulting 
from injuries received while lighting 
a fire, 

Henrj 1'- O'Bryan, of Troy, N. Y.. 
died a few days ago from injuries re- 

i ei\ ed while at a lire. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



"Smoke-Eater" Shaw of the New Orleans 
Department. 

The transfer of Captain E. J. Shaw 
of engine company 20, in the Dryades 
Market, to engine company 2, Julia 
street, New Orleans, says Fire and 
Water Engineering, has revived the 
memory of many incidents in his 
career. For sixteen years he has been 
in the Thalia street company, and dur- 
ing that period he earned for himself 
a reputation that easily placed him at 
the top of the city's firefighting force, 
and he was looked up to on all sides as 
one who would give the best service 
to the Dryades street business men 
and, besides, would be in easy reach 
for the large fires common in that dis- 
trict. During the whole of his connec- 
tion with the department his sole idea 
has been to be known as a fireman and 
nothing else. As the best all-around 
fireman in the department he stands 
acknowledged by all, and as he has 
sustained the most injuries of any man 
in the service, some idea may be gain- 
ed of his intripidity and fearlessness. 
Two instances of each quality may be 
quoted: Some years ago at a large 
hardware fire on Dryades street, the 
report gained currency that there was 
a number of demijohns of gasoline in 
the path of the flames, and if they 
were once reached by the flames there 
would be trouble and a-plenty of it, at 
that. Shaw heard what was wanted 
and was the first man to volunteer. ' 
He crawled in on his hands and knees [ 
and made four trips, until every bit of 
the gasoline was removed. His hands 
and face were blistered, and the only 
comment of the "Smoke Eater" was, I 
"Well, chief, I got the durn stuff."! 
When Driver Leveque was pinned in 
a third story attic, and all escape cut 
off and death seemed imminent, Cap- 
tain Shaw scaled a steep slate roof 
and swung himself down into a win- 
dow until Leveque's rescue was 
effected. 

At all of the large fires in the busi- 
ness district whenever the cry goes 
out that a man is hurt or burned, the 
usual comment is, "I bet you Shaw is 
hurt." The man is a perfect wizard 
when it comes to twisting in and out 
of tight places, and it is said that he 
can stand more smoke and flame than 
any youngster in the business. On 



the ladders he is as agile as a monkey. 
He is always at the pipe, and only 
gets excited when he cannot be the 
first to enter the burning structure. 

At last week's meeting of the Los 
Angeles Fire Commission the follow- 
ing men were appointed, at the re- 
commendation of the chief: Eli 0. 
Carlsen, lieutenant; Geo. A. Kelley, 
captain, and Emil H. Holmes, fireman. 

At a recent meeting of the Fire- 
men's Pension Board of Los Angeles, 
the death of two pensioners were re- 
ported and the adjustment of insur- 
ance referred to the City Attorney. 
Thos. J. McDonald, captain, entered 
the service in 1895, and died May 11, 
1913, as the result of an accident. 
Wm. Stewart Rowan, lieutenant, en- 
tered the service in 1891, and died in 
San Francisco while on the pension 
list, May 17, 1913. 

Alcazar Theatre. 

What promises to be the most bril- 
liant season in Alcazar history is to 
commence next Monday evening, 
when Leo Ditrichstein, the noted 
actor-author, will appear in David 
Belasco's greatest comedy production, 
"The Concert," in which he will be 
aided by thiee prominent members of 
his original support, Isabel Irving, 
Cora Witherspoon and Madge West, 
with Alcazar players completing ihe 
cast. Mr. Ditrichstein and the Misses 
Irving, Witherspoon and West. ha\e 
come direct from the Belasco Theatre . 
New York, where "The Concert" 
closed its third consecutive year as a 
high-priced attraction in tl at city and 
on tour. Notwithstandirg the extra- 
ordinary expense of obtaining the play 
and its principal interpreters, the 
Alcazar management, will adhere to 
regular admittance rates, which are 
fifty per cent less than those which 
were charged for the privilege of wit- 
nessing the same performance in this 
city a few months ago. 

Empress Theatre. 

The headline attraction at the Em- 
press Sunday afternoon will be Mr. 
Hal Stephens, the distinguished char- 
acter player presenting "Famous 
Characters in Famous Scenes." The 
feature attraction is a novelty fresh 
from the London Hippodrome, pro- 



vided by the Nathal Trio, one member 
of which climbs up into the boxes and 
along the edge of the balcony in such 
a manner as to prompt the question, 
"Is it man or monkey?" The Four 
Melody Monarchs will be another fea- 
ture of a strong and active comedy 
bill. Gales of laughter will follow in 
the wake of Van Cleve-Denton and 
"Pete." Pete is a mule that is almost 
human. Fred (Broomstick) Elliott, 
with his one-stringed fiddle and his 
quaint rube mannerisms, will keep 
patrons on the alert. A diverting 
comedy playlet entitled "A Snap 
Shot" will be presented by Joseph 
and Mara Dowling, old-time favorites. 
Sid Vincent and Irene Lome have a 
series of songs, dances and charac- 
terizations. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CAbH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



THE best attention and service for the man who car- 
ries a HOWARD Watch not on account of the 
watch, but because he is likely to be that kind 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does su*r- 
pesl a man who appreciate* quality and is quite able to 
know whether he is getting it or not. 

Not every' jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 

pay for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, anil a printed ticket attached— from thi 
17-jewel (double roller) in a Crescent Extra or 
Bi ss Extra gold-filled case at $40, to the 23- 
[ewel at $15<>— and the Edward Howard model 

Admiral Slgsbe< has written a little t k. 

i..lt of the Howard Watch." giving 
ol his own Howard in I S Nav) 

enjoy it. Droi d, Dept w. 

and we'll send you a copy. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AIND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. 



I RANCISCO 



Home phone S 2317 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZN1C Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Brodcri(k 
Trtphonr UV.I 4824 S AN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mei rill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1218 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



en You're Buyin 9 Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

^S 



to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 
But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 





good oil, say 



PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Soie Distributor for the Pacific Coast 543 flolden date Ave., fan Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom nit checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance . $2.00 

Six months 1.00 



ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 

continuous ones. 



Kditurial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908, at the 
Postolfice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



Owing to Captain Muldowney being in the 
hospital, the further hearing of Lieut Smith's 
case was put over. 

At a meeting- of the Pension Board last 
Monday night, George McDonald was granted 
a pension for disability, to take effect July 1. 

The Finance Committee of the Board of 
Supervisors has seen fit not to recommend 
the appropriation to purchase a camera and 
supplies to be used by the fire department in 
taking photographs of fires, etc. They claim 
it is entirely unnecessary, stating the police 
outfit is at the department's disposal. 

During April the fire loss in Seattle was 
$23,623.78. of which $12,947.66 was in build- 
ings and $10,(176. 12 on contents. There were 
115 alarms; actual fires, 98; fires with loss, 
47; no second alarms and but one special call. 
The total value of buildings and contents in- 
volved in fires, $300,369.55. 



The recent conn decision in Seattle sustain- 
ing the action of the Board of Public Works 
in purchasing three Seagrave motor hook and 
ladder trucks, will probably end the political 
and newspaper activities which have pestered 
the Boaid for the past three years. Seattle 
can now buy fire apparatus and hose on merit. 



Chief Officer Ha rrieB. Lee of the Melbourne, 
Australia, Fire Brigade, reached Seattle the 
early part of last week, having landed in 
Victoria late last month. He has been sent 
by his municipality to inspect fire apparatus, 
especially motor, in the principal cities of 
this country, Canada and Europe, and will 
not arrive in Australia again until the middle 
of October. On last, Saturday he witnessed 
i he* official test of ihe new Gorham engine at 
Tacoma and was much pleased, but thinks so 
powerful a machineunnecessary in his city. 

On the morning of June 1st, the big Sea- 
grave motor aerial truck at Seattle fire head- 
quarters, turned from Third avenue South 
into Jackson street at a high rate of speed. 
A freight car was in the street and the hind 
end crashed into it, hending the channel 
frame, sixth wheel, hind axle and other rear 
parts. Fortunately no one was seriously 
hurt, a sprained ankle being the worst injury 
to the men. The most unfortunate feature 
is that Seattle has no reserve truck and con 



sequently No. One will be off the map for 
some time to come. Their truck had run 22 
months without having to go to the shop. 

In an article which appeared in last week's 
issue in connection with W. J. Mathison's 
appearance before the Fire Commission, at 
the expiration of his one-year suspension, 
which he spent in visiting the picturesque 
spots of England and Ireland, we erred in 
stating he was a member of engine company 
35. At. the time of Mathison's suspension he 
was a member of engine6and was suspended 
by Acting Battalion Chief Conroy (now cap- 
tain of engine company 22), on complaint of 
Captain Lawson. It is the wish and hope of 
the editor of the Pacific Fireman that both 
he (Mathison) and McCarthy make good and 
never again appear before the Board except 
for some meritorious action. 



Relief Fund Acknowledgements. 

Department of Public Safety. 

Dayton, 0., May 22, 1913. 

Mr. Geo. F. Brown. Secretary Fire Department Mutual Aid 
Association, 2136 Geary Street. San Francisco. Cal. 

Dear Sir: — Some few days ago I received a 
letter from you stating that your organiza- 
tion had turned over to Mayor James Rolph, 
Jr., the sum of $2008.50 for the unfortunate 
firemen of this city. To-day Edward Philipps, 
Mayor of this city, has handed me your draft 
for this amount. 

I can assure you that I am unahie to express 
in writing mv thanks to your organization 
and yourself for this magnificent gift, for you 
have given as only those who have met with 
such a disaster could understand how to give. 

As yet the men of the department are not 

aware of this most generous offering, but as 

soon as they are informed of the fact, I am 

sure you will receive many letters of thanks. 

Respectfully yours, 

Frank B. Ramby. 
Chief of Fire Department. 



Executive Department. 

Dayton, 0., May 22, 191.1. 

Hon. James Rolph, Jr., Mayor City of San Francisco. Cal. 

My Dear Sir: — 1 am in receipt of your letter 
of the 13lh inst., with check for $2008.50 for 
the stricken firemen of this city. I have de- 
livered this to Mr. Frank Ramby, chief of 
the fire department, who will see that proper 
distribution is made. 

I wish to express my sincere thanks to the 
fire department of your city and to yourself 
for this most generous and noble deed, and 
you can rest assured that same will always 
be remembered. 

Respectfully yours, 

Edward Philipps. 
Mayor City of Dayton, Ohio. 

Mayor's Office. 
San Francisco, May 29, 1913. 

Captain Georpe F. Brown, care San Francisco Fire De- 
partment. San Francisco. California. 

Dear Captain Brown: — It affords me pleas- 
ure to hand you herewith a letter received by 
me from Mayor Philipps of the city of Dayton, 
Ohio, acknowledging receipt of the generous 
contribution of the firemen of San Francisco 
to the stricken firemen of Dayton, and sent 



to the mayor through me at your request. 

I know you will be pleased at the tenor of 
Mayor Philipps' letter, and I again desire to 
express my thanks and appreciation at the 
generosity displayed by our own San Francisco 
fire boys, in whom I feel a personal as well as 
an official interest. 

Very sincerely yours, 

James Rolph, Jr., Mayor. 



Business Meeting of David Scannell Club 

San Francisco, May 29, 1913. 

A specially-called meeting of the David 
Scannell Club was held May 29th, 1913, at 7 
p. m., at Veteran Firemen's hall, 368 Fell 
street. 

The meeting was called to order by Presi- 
dent Alexander George. Secretary Charles 
Brennan and Director Frank Smith were 
absent. 

The following bills were ordered paid: C. 
W. Nevin & Co., printing, $25; Veteran's 
Hall Association, hall rent for April and 
Mav, $10. 

The Committee on Constitution and By- 
Laws presented a draft of a constitution. 
After a general discussion, the president was 
ordered, on a motion regularly made, seconded 
and carried., to have sufficient copies made 
and to present one to each director for further 
study and consideration. 

On a motion made, seconded and carried, 
the Humboldt Savings Bank was designated 
as the depository of the funds of the club. 

A motion was unanimously adopted stating 
that it was the sense of the directors that the 
members of the club should be fully ac- 
quainted with the proceedings of each meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors and that the 
columns of the PACIFIC Fireman should be 
used to accomplish this purpose. 

The secretary reported the collection of 
dues and initiations from six hundred and 
fifty-three members. 

The treasurer's report showed a balance on 
hand of $294. 

A motion was made to adjourn at the call 
of the chair. Seconded and carried. The 
meeting then adjourned. 

S. J. Spear, 

Secretary Pro. Tern. 

We are requested to announce the coming 
nuptials of Michael Dwyer of engine com- 
pany 21 by his many friends. The bride-to- 
be is the beautiful daughter of an old Spanish 
family, who is at present employed as an 
operator in the San Francisco Telephone Ex- 
change. The marriage is to take place Sun- 
day, July 20, and will be solemnized in the 
Sacred Heart Church. We understand the 
happy pair will spend their honeymoon in 
Honolulu, as the bride has relatives residing 
there. Dwyer has a host of friends in the 
department, and the young lady is a general 
favorite)among her numerous co-workers. The 
many friends of the couple extend congratu- 
lations, including the editor of the Pacific 
Fireman. 



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PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
June 6, we take the following excerpts from 
the Administrative Committee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From A. J. Anderson, hoseman engine 45, 
requesting that the date of the leave of ab- 
sence for fifteen days heretofore granted 
him, be changed so as to commence on July 
16th instead of July 1st, as stated in his 
original application. Granted. 

From Battalion Cook, submitting a com- 
plaint against J. Woodman, hoseman engine 
5, for addressing insulting language to .his 
superior officer, Lieut. Isaacs of engine 5, on 
May 2G. Referred to the Board for hearing. 

From the Civil Service Commission, that if 
J. L. Collins, captain engine 29, continues in 
the position as operator to the chief engineer 
that it will not approve of his salary demand 
as captain in the department. Referred to 
City Attorney. 

From the Foreman Hydrant, requesting 
that the Hydrant Department be furnished 
with a typewriting machine. • Referred to 
the Secretary of the Board to report back. 

From the chief engineer, calling attention 
to the need of repairs to the drill tower and 
recommending lhat the same be given a gen- 
eral overhauling and that some additional 
equipments be installed. Approved and that 
the chief engineer prepare a list of the re- 
pairs and alterations required to be submitted 
to the Board of Public Works. 

From Louise Nippert, notifying the Board 
that she is about to excavate her lot adjoin- 
ing on Stockton street occupied by engine 
company 5, and requesting this department 
to take the necessary steps to protect its 
property. Referred to Board of Public Works 
Cor- immediate action. 

The following applications for salary on ac- 
count of disability, resulting from injuries re- 
ceived in the discharge of duty, were allowed: 

Michael A. Foley, hoseman engine 19, re- 
questing I hut he be allowed salary during 
disability, resulting from an injury to his foot 
while working at a fire on May 6. 

Joseph Nannery, driver engine 44, request- 
ing that he be allowed salary during disability, 
resulting from an injury to his foot while 
working at the quarters of his company on 

May ;i. 

Frank Murphy, lieutenant engine 45. re- 
questing ihat he be allowed salary during 
disability, resulting from an injury l<» his 
wrist while on duty at the quarters of his 
' patty '»ti Anril 8. 

A. A. M Carte, truckman truck 12, re 
-lie 1 ting lhat tie be allowed salary (hiring 
dis ilnlil '. . re tilt ing fi out ;m injury to his 
arm while on duly a I I lie quarters of his com- 
pany on A pril 30 

P. W. I, ally, truck 9. requesting thai he I" 
allowed salary during disability, resulting 
from an injury to his toot while working at a 
lire on May 1H. 

i'\ C Gerlach, hoseman engine 5. r. que I 
ing that he lie nllowud ,-al:ir\ dining (lis 
ability, re lilting fi "in an Injur) tele fool 



while working at the quarters of his company 
on March 15. 

From T. J. Sheehan, engineer engine 32, 
requesting a leave of absence for twelve 
days, without pay, commencing August 1. 
Granted. 

From the Comptroller of the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition Company, cmplaining that a num- 
ber of the members of the department are 
failing to pay their subscriptions made to 
that company. Referred to the chief engi- 
neer to call to the attention of the members. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the pits for the hydrants and hydrant 
valves at the Fair Grounds be made large 
enough to accommodate the regulation high 
pressure valves of this department and also 
that a man from this department be detailed 
to work in conjunction with the fire protec- 
tion engineers while the high pressure pipes 
are being installed there. Approved and 
that the matter be referred to the chief engi- 
neer to take up with the Panama-Pacific Ex- 
position Company. 

From the City Attorney, submitting an 
opinion in the matter of the members of the 
Underwriters' Fire Patrol being entitled to 
free installation and maintenance of fire 
alarm tappers. Filed and a copy forwarded 
to Chief Nixon of the Department of Elec- 
tricity. 

Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

From Lieut. A. Isaacs, Acting Captain en- 
gine 5, complaining against the actions of 
Hoseman J. Woodman of that company. 

When Isaacs and Woodman were sworn, 
Isaacs was asked to tell the Board about the 
case. He had no sooner started in than 
Woodman stood up and addressing himself in 
a loud voice personally to Commissioner 
Brandenstein, calling him "chief," denied 
every statement made by Isaacs. Both were 
standing up, yelling and gestulating at once, 
making such a din lhat Commissioner Dillon 
had to remind them Ihey were not in a Broad- 
way dive and told them to take their seats, 
thecommissionerassuring Woodman he would 
be given a chance to air his side after Isaacs. 

The Board, after hearing the testimony "I 
liulh contestants and witnesses, decided that 
;i reprimand and a lew words of caution from 
Chief Murphy to both men in future would do 
this time, providing Woodman would apolo- 
gize to lsnacs, which he promised. 

From the Webb Motor Fire Apparatus 
i lompam , nolifj ing Hi I nard I hal chemical 
engine was shipped ott M;.> 81, 1913, and re- 
questing extension el limi until June26, 1918. 
Granted. 

Matter of 111.' select inn of life line bs 
lei I 1 lit lei < li cal \ i .i I , 1918 II, anil all 

i hnrizit e the tarj t" puri tie i 

Appmv i (i. 

Approval of specifications covering instal- 

lation ol an equipping firel is with marine 

end ine t emaphoi as Pul over next met til p 

Frc.ni the chief engii r, calling si tention 

i e the facl t hal I" 1 i roi i ion hni I" t n madi 
in i he budget for 1913 l I for the position ol 
in t am i .mi. i in. , i en" 'i in i onnection 
■nli l In- auxiliary high pressure system. 
Tut over one week. 



Fireman Nine Good Losers. 



The Fireman nine, comprising the picked 
talent of the San Francisco Fire Department, 
went up against Healdsburg's crack nine in 
that city last Sunday and took their wallop 
to the tune of 7 to 1 so good naturedly that 
the Healdsburgers invited them to come again, 
later on, and take another, but the boys de- 
clare it will be horse and horse next time. 

In a communication to this paper a member 
of the Fireman's nine writes of the game as 
follows: 

The game started with the Fireman at the 
bat, and Loh hit one to center that looked good 
for a single, but after a hard run the center 
fielder made a great catch; Hackett walked, 
Hughes fouled to the catcher and Shea lined 
one into the waiting hands of the right fielder. 
No runs. Healdsburg, in their turn, scored 
one run. The score stood one to nothing until 
the fourth inning, when the Fireman tied the 
score; Hughes, the first man up, singled, 
Shea then singled, sending Hughes to third 
and Moholy scoring Hughes by a clean drive 
to center. The score stood one to one until 
the last of the seventh, when luck played into 
the hands of the home team, they scoring two 
runs without a hit, the umpire giving them a 
shade on close ones. It was in this inning 
that Moholy brushed off the plate and the 
umpire made the remark that if he had done 
that before he might have give him some that 
cut the corners. 

The Fireman got busy in their half of the 
eighth and it looked as if they would even up 
the score, for with three on bases and only 
one out, Comber hit a line drive to right lhat 
looked good for a home run and it looked 
mighty blue for Healdsburg; but they did net 
figure on Bennett, the right fielder, who made 
a great catch end easily doubled Walsh at 
second, who had already crossed the plate, 
thinking Bennett haa no chance to make the 
catch. 

In the last half Shea struck out Mtesnerand 
Bennett, hit lex; McCord got one oh an error. 
Fox going to second; Mitchell then advanced 
them to the next station with a single and 
then Kennedy with two and three hit a long 
foul to left tiial bounced in (he grass, and, to 
the surprise of everybody, the umpire called 
it a fair hall, and before they found the ball 
four runs were scored. Neither side done 
anything in tin' ninth, the game ending 
Healdsburg 7, Fireman 1. 

The line up was as follows: 

Moholv Cat hi ' Vi In 

Rhoa .......... Pllcaai 

Ltnd ' bet B 4 Buckle Base 

I ,.i, ii. i p.i' , 

Mil i. :.'.! Baar Mitchell 

I.. . S|). 'i I St.'ii i 

Collett. In, da l "I.! . 

. . i 

Hackatl ' ■ nter F leld : Brlroid 

'the boj s hud a fine tin 
burgers declare 'he Fireman line t" b 
the town. 
ti'Ti'i'i'i. d ii-.- Fin n nr I ine i nt up a 
" "i game al Goal Island, Saturday, June 7. 



Telephone DouaUi 1255 

U. J. BORCK, mi i a., or 

\l\Kt S A SP1 i IAI IV OF 

PIRBMBtVS UINll "< )RM8 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 F.DDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



o 1 



American -La France Fire Engine Co. 



OF CALIFORNIA 



151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries! BROWN & KENNEDY LOTS $15 



$150 LOTS 



Cur. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



FLORAL 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 

Freeh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Alsu 

ornamental and Dowering; plants in variety. 

Special attention given to II". riding and Pun* rai Ord* n 

Arttstu Decorations ami D* *ign». 

Gardening, f-.'tc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To ItKAOfl Nims[-:iiiES, take Castro street car lo 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

t<> Douelass and 24th streets. 




112 S. Spring Si. 
Los Angeles 



I Hi* M 1615 
• Market 5725 



717 K Street 
Sacramento 



EAGLESON & CO. 



■-.■<. E. KENNEDY 

Phones 

FUNERAL WORK A SPECIALTY 
LOWEST PRICES 

3091 SIXTEENTH STREET 

NEAR VALENCIA 
UNION STORE SAN FRANCISCO 



Tiportera and Manufacture 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 



Home C 4<*)2 



MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1118 MARKET ST., opp. Seventh 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



WARRANT BROKHRS 



Phone Market 5417 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Douglas 4716 



Home C 2458 



630 KEARNV STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



LAMANETBROS wm. 



F. EIGAN 



HATS. UNDKEWEAR, FTC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Qenls' Furnishing Good? 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



M. It. C. V. S. 

VHTHRINARV SURGEON TO S. F. F. D. 

1155 GOLDEN UATE AYK. 
l\ lephonea Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



EASY TERMS 

=IN= 

Marine View Terrace 

(THE PIEDMONT OF RICHMOND) 
DON'T 

let tins opportunity pass bj . This is ai solute ly 
your Lst chance to get close in propel ly at such 
prices and terms. 

Only seven minutes walk fr«m the 
City Hall. Ashland Avenue will reach 
Marine View Terrace ll r< leh ll t n uticipal 
tunnel ?nd continue on throui h ihf i i.l if 1 1 tlh 
of the property tithe new (eny Iron' which I rats 
will run regularly to and (rem ^an Frat Cisco. 

Bonds have heen sold ard the n < nc y is 
now in the hands of the City 1 iffsuri I for 'he 
immediate construction o( tl rre n;r<\cn<rls 
and values will dcuble and trttle in a veiy 
short time. 

Don't delay buy now instead of 
wishing you h:d later on. 

For maps or fuither tnfoimalion, see cr write 

WENHAM & PAUL 



1444 San Pablo Ave. 



Oakland. California 





wsBsa 




_^^o''::7 7\ : v : 



fIREMAN 



=DQ= 




VOL. X.-NO. 31 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JUNE 21, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Does Motor Apparatus Mean Fewer Men ? 

It has not been found by experience 
that the motorizing of fire departments 
has led to a reduction of the number 
of men, the Director of Public Safety 
John H. Dailey of Pittsburg is re- 
ported assaying that this is one of the 
economies which motorizing fire de- 
partments will eventually effect. 
Speaking of his own department, he 
calculates that if it were completely 
motorized a saving of about $85,000 
would result. Concluding his state- 
ment, he says: 

"A very large item of economy that 
must be added to this is that brought 
about through the reduction of men 
in the service. This reduction, it 
should be understood, will not be 
caused by the discharge of any of 
those now in service. The fire de- 
partment loses every year through 
various causes, such as illness, death, 
voluntary resignation because of en- 
gaging in other business and retire- 
ment on pension, 40 to 50 men. It 
will take about three years to com- 
pletely motorize our department, 
which means we will lose in that time 
from 120 to 150 men now members of 
the department. When the latter is 
completely motorized, with the same 
number of pieces of apparatus now 
used, we will need 116 men less, as 
til 're are that many who do nothing 
but take care of their horses. This 
reduction in the force will mean an 
additional saving to the city of ap- 
proximately $143,000, and this added 
to the saving in i he cost of mainten- 
ance ni ikes a total of $227,000. 

"When the entire department is 
[notorized we will be able to dispense 



with about 12 engine houses now in 
operation without decreasing the effi- 
ciency of the department. This, of 
course, will be made possible by the 
increased radius of motorized appa- 
ratus, amounting to perhaps 300 per 
cent. The city will have 12 valuable 
pieces of property for sale, and it is 
fair to assume that we will receive at 
least $500,000 for all the property sold. 
Add to this the saving in maintenance 
and decrease in wages and we have a 
total of $727,000. The cost of motor- 
izing the department will be approxi- 
mately $500,000, leaving a net profit 
of over 50 per cent on the transaction." 

On the way to a fire in No. 190 West 
street. New York city, on May 25, five 
firemen and Lieutenants James Mc- 
Cambly and Louis Grimm were dan- 
gerously injured when fire truck 10 
was steered to the sidewak at West 
and Fulton streets to avoid crashing 
into a fire engine. The men were 
putting on coats and hats as the truck 
turned down Fulton to West street. 
When it rounded the corner engine 6 
was seen coming north on West street. 
The chauffeur of the truck and the 
driver of the engine tried to stop, and 
in trying to avert a crash the automo- 
bile swung against a platform running 
the length of a warehouse. All of 
the firemen were thrown from their 
places. Grimm fell beneath the 
wheels of the truck and both his legs 
were broken. The other men suffered 
from cuts and shock. 

The Civil Service Commission al 
Newport. Ky., has been abolished and 
henceforth both the fire and police 
departments will be under the direct 
control of Commissioner Ebert. 



Protest Against Rigid Regulations. 

A correspondent writes to the Fire- 
man's Herald that a shake-up in the 
Detroit Fire Department is probable 
before July 1. It is said that several 
officers, including at least two assis- 
tant chiefs, will be retired on account 
of old age. The commission will also 
make some important changes in the 
rules. Mayor Marx, shortly after his 
election, threatened to "open up" the 
fire department. The mayor had his 
attention called to the "closed" policy 
of the commission through the com- 
plaints of the men in the ranks against 
some of the rigid regulations. The 
mayor quietly investigated and con- 
vinced himself that a number of im- 
portant changes ought to be made for 
the betterment of the service. When 
the mayor appointed Louis Katz fire 
commissioner to succeed William V. 
Moore, he expressed himself as satis- 
fied that the new commissioner would 
champion the cause of the men. 

Members of the Alpena (Mich. ) Fire 
Department are indignant over an 
order issued by the Council that, be- 
ginning June 1, the firemen shall rise 
early in the morning and Hush the 
paved streets of the city with hose. 
The men declare it will be practically 
impossible to accomplish this work 
and are planning to protest to the 

( 'onncil. 

Owing to repeated injuries received 
in the line of duty. Battalion Chief 

Bert Fisher. Chicago, secretary of the 
National firemen's Association, has 

been retired ,.n a pension of half pa\ . 
He u ill enter business life in the sup- 
ply department of a prominent manu- 
facturer of lire apparatus. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Nevada City's Auto Seagrave. 

The Morning Union of Grass Valley 
of May 1, speaking of Nevada City's 
new $6000 Seagrave fire auto, says the 
capabilities of the machine were de- 
monstrated to the people of this city 
yesterday, the members of the Nevada 
City Fire Department having brought 
the machine down at the request of 
Chief Clinch of the Grass Valley de- 
partment. With the machine at a 
standstill in front of the Eagle Hose 
house, an alarm was turned in from 
box 51, cornerof Main and Altastreets. 
The machine was started up and was 
in front of the box before the alarm 
had come in the third time. The ma- 
chine is certainly a splendid one and 
bespeaks of the enterprise of the fire- 
men of the sister city. 

Edward Gallivan, a member of the 
Elmira (N. Y.) Fire Department, has 
been appointed master mechanic of 
the department by the Fire Commis- 
sioners. Gallivan was formerly em- 



Van Order will receive back pay from 
the time of his suspension in De- 
cember. 

Alcazar Theatre. 

Leo Ditrichstein's newest comedy, 
"Such is Life," will be presented for 
the first time on any stage next Mon- 
day evening at the Alcazar, with its 
author leading a cast which includes 
Isabel Irving, Cora Witherspoon, 
Madge West, Anne Livingston and the 
best talent of the stock company. This 
latest work of the prolific playwright 
has been in rehearsal daily during 
the last two weeks, and all directly 
concerned in its production predict 
another Ditrichstein success. If their 
expectation is fulfilled, "Such is Life" 
will be its creator's next starring 
vehicle under David Belasco's direc- 
tion, opening on Broadway before this 
year expires. Places shown are a 
country inn frequented by artists, 
Black's studio in New York and his 
friend's residence in the same city. An 
atmosphere of Bohemianism through- 



BUY A LOT IN 

BEAUTIFUL FAIRFAX HEIGHTS 

AT THE STATION OF FAIRFAX 
FINE INVESTMENT 

LOTS $100 and "P $10 down $5 per month 

Wooded and Cleared. Water-piped to Every Lot and 
All Roads Built 

ROCCO BROTHERS 

MATT BROWN Agent at Trad 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



ployed by the American-La France 

Fire Engine Company. After becom- j out the play will be sustained by real 

ing a member of the fire department I islie staging and appropriate musical 



he spent two months there on spec,ia 
leave of absence to study motor appa- 
ratus. He possesses a civil service 
commission certificate. He has been 
authorized to select men and instruct 
them for work as engineers and as 
drivers of motor apparatus. He wi 1 
have charge of all the engines and 
motor apparatus in the department. 

William Boland, a Chicago "fire 
fan," died at the county hospital last 
week as the result of his attempt to 
jump on the step of the apparatus of 
engine 15 April 27, while it was re- 
sponding to an alarm from South 
Center avenue and West Twenty- 
second street. The horses were gal- 
loping as Boland tried to swing him- 
self into the vehicle and he missed his 
footing and fell, striking his head 
against the pavement and fracturing 
his skull. 

Ths Appellate division has denied 
the request of the city of Troy, N. Y., 
to go to the Court of Appeals with 
the case of Joseph Van Order, the 
E Idy steamer company hoseman, who 
was dismissed from the service by the 
city and unanimously ordered rein- 
stated by the Appellate Division. 



effects. 



Empress Theatre. 



,One of the greatest laugh producers 
in vaudeville holds headline place on a 
programme overbalanced with comedy 
at the Empress Theatre Sunday after- 
noon. It is "Fun in a Boarding House," 
■the stage settingsof which shows two 
floors ot an actors' hotel. The feature 
attractian is provided by the Bowman 
Brothers, "The Blue Grass Boys," 
well known blackface minstrel come- 
dians, who toured the country as stars 
of Bowman Brothers Minstrels. Del 
Adelphia, the Master Magician and 
his five assistants will present "The 
Mysteries," the staging of which re- 
presents a cost of $10,000. Bob Archer, 
of Archer and Belford. offer the ex- 
traordinary comedy hit "A Janitor's 
Troubles." Julia Rrorty is the co- 
medienne of the celebrated Rooney 
family, her father being Pal Rooney, 
the famous Irish comedian. Alvin and 
Kenny, corns dians on the flying rings, 
will be found an element of newness 
to a marked degree. Their work is 
thrilling and daring and is filled with 
comedy exploits. Shuyler & Young, 
entertainers, and the Essanceescope 
make up the bill. 



THE beet attention and service for the man who car- 
lies a HOWARD Watch- not on account of the 
watch, but because he is likely to be that kind 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does sub- 
gesl a man who appreciates quality and is quite able to 
know whether he is getting it or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, anil a printed ticket attached— from the 
17-jewel (double roller! in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at $40, to the 23- 
(ewel at $150— and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. 

Admiral Sigshee has written a little book. 
"The Log "f Hie Howard Watch." giving the 
recnrrl of his own Howard in the U. S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Orop us a post-card. Erept. N, 
a n.l we'll send you a copy. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mars 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS A.ISD JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

Home phone S 25 1 7 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Broderitk 
Telephone We.1 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



Tripp Remedy Co. 

POSITIVELY Cl'KKS 

Blood Poison. Chronic Catarrh, Rheumatism, 

Goitre, Tumorous Growths, Malaria, 

Erysipelas, Scrofula, Lupus, 

Tuberbular- Glands, 

Joints and all Blood Diseases 

473 TURK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



[' A (J 1 1' 1 e I 1 ' IKE M A iS 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Sole Distributor for the Pacific Coast 543 Golden Oate Ave., San Francisco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 



P 



►acifi 




IREMAN 



Drury of engine 35, who died last Monday, 
adjourned out of respect to that officer. 
The resolutions were ordered spread upon 
the minutes and a copy of same was ordered 
sent to his surviving relatives. Captain 
Drury was about 48 years of age and was a 
member of the department eighteen years. 
His funeral took place Thursday. Interment 
was in Holy Cross Cemetery. Chief Murphv 
stated he was a brave officer and was a lieu- 
tenant of engine 26 for many years. Captain 
Drury was not a married man. 

Trial of Lieut. Smith and Hoseman Horan 

The second hearing of the case of Lieut. 
Frank Smith, charged with using certain lan- 
guage towurd Capt. Muldowney, was heard 
Wednesday night by the Fire Commission. 
Much of the former testimony wasgone over. 
( 'ominissioner Dillon endeavored lo show collu- 
In justice to Driver De Martini of engine 5, , s j„ n between Capt. Muldowney and certain 
it is only fair to state he was not inchargeof witnesses-Haines in particular. After some 
the apparatus at the time of the accident to discussion between Commissioners Branden- 
the engine at Dupont and Washington streets stain and Dillon in the matter, Haines, who 
Sunday, May 8. The seat was occupied by a I p r0V ed a prolific witness, was put on the stand 

relief driver. and interrogated by Dillon. Haines stated he 

Julvl Battalion ~Chief WilhTsevers his con- [ met Muldowney, Regan and Witt on their 
nection with the San Francisco Fire Depart- tt 
ment, retiring on half pay of battalion chief. 
He claims 46 years continual service. Dr. 
Lagan, physician to the department, pro- 
nounces him in exceptionally fine condition, 
considering his age and service in the de- 
partment. 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BV 

JAS. K, MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance 

Six months . 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

1 1 isoi ted mi the most favorable terms, especially large and 

continuous ones. 

Ivditoiial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
PostofRce at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
cress of March 3. 1879. 



There is.no perceptible improvement in 



go along and tell what he knew about the 
case, which he agreed. Haines, when asked 
by Dillon, when did he learn that Muldowney 
had filed a complaint against Smith? Haines, 
in answer, stated he knew of the complaint 
before he left on his vacation, after which 
Commissioner Brandenstein stated that he 
felt satisfied that the lieutenant was guilty 



Battalion Chief O'Brien's condition, outside of the language used toward Muldowney, but 
of that he is able to move the fingers of his if he could produce any witnesses to prove 
left hand — the side that's parahzed. A man otherwise he was in favor of giving him a 
from his district is detailed each day to keep [ chance. Smith stated he could produce sev- 
him company and attend to his immediate eral but did not care to make any trouble for 
wants. The chief is not at all despondent them, hut mentioned Operator Nolan. 



that when Horan entered quarters he was per- 
fectly sober. Asked if he was trying to shield 
Horan he replied no, not any more than any 
other man in the house. As to mutilating 
the house journal, Horan explained that the 
book fell to the floor in the excitemeut in re- 
sponding to an alarm and picking it up hastily 
the leaves became torn; he also stated he 
only drank one bottle of beer at supper and 
claimed he was perfectly sober; and as to 
the abusive language to Spellman, he did not 
intend it to be serious and did not think the 
lieutenant would take it that way. 

After considerable discussion, and as the 
case seemed to be pretty well tangled up, the 
Board went into executive session, including 
Chief Murphy and Battalion Chief Murphy, 
which lasted over half an hour. 

After reconvening Commissioner Dillon 
stated Horan was found guilty of the first 
charge and it was the - judgment of the Board 
that he be suspended 30 days from June 3. 
As to the second charge, the evidence was 
not conclusive, it was therefore dismissed. 

When the name of Lieut. Smith was called 
it was found he had gone back to quarters, 
but after some delay he arrived. Dillon 
asked him if he had any objection to taking a 
transfer to some other house? The lieutenant 
ansured the commissionerhe had not; in factit 
was just what he wanted, stating he was on 
pins and needles all the time he remained in 
his present quarters, as he knew some of the 
men would pay no respect to his orders, and 
it was agreed that he make application as 
soon as possible, whereupon the case of Capt. 
Muldowney was dismissed, Smith shaking 
hands with him before leaving the room. 



and bears up well considering his trouble. 

At Wednesday's session of the Fire Com 
mission bids were submitted by the American- 
La France Fire Engine Company, Gorham 
Lnuineering and Fire Apparatus Company 
and the Alliance Auto Company for fire! 
steamers and tractors and steamers combined. 
The matter is to be further threshed out ; 
Monday night. There is a balance of $23,000 
on hand of last year's appropriation for the i 
fical year ending June 30, to be spent for 
apparatus. 

The firemen of National City, Cal., have 
formed a firemen's club. It is called the 
National City Firemen's Clnb. The following 
is a list of ihe officers: Harry M. Lindner, 
president; Claude BulUn, vice-president; R. 
Victor Langford, secretary; Geo. E. Miner, 
financial secretary; Carl S. Owtn, treasurer; 
Kyle Wm. Alexander, chaplain; Arthur K. 
Patterson, captain of the guards; Robert 
Clemens, inside guard. Directors ; R. E. 
Miner, chairman; F. M. Tattersall, A. G. 
Arnold, W. J. Markham, J. Fred Patterson. 
The PACIFIC Fireman is kept on file. 

The Fire Commission, at a special meeting 
Wednesday night, after adopting a set of re 
solutions on the death of Captain Michael 



Nolan not being present was sent for. When 
Nolan took the stand he knew very little; he 
seemed to have a poor memory for times or 
date-; he stated he heard something about 
Haines being Muldowney's "star" witnes? in 
the case. Finally the case was put aside 
without any action to take up the Horan case, 
requesting Muldowney and Smith to remain, 
the witnesses being dismissed. 

In the trial of P. H. Horan, hoseman engine 
10, for absenting himself from quarters on 
June 3, after 10 o'clock without permi?sion; 
also for mutilating the official book of said 
company on said date. Horan, when sworn, 
pleaded guilty to the first charge and not 
guilty to the second. Lieut. Spellman was 
put on the stand and stated when Horan en- 
tered quarters it was 10:20 and that he was 
intoxicated. When asked by Commissioner 
Brandenstein how he knew Horn was drunk, 
Spellman stated he looked drowsy and acted 
like a drunken man; he also said that Horan 
threatened him with vile and abu.-ive lan- 
guarge if he reported him. Battalion Chief 
Murphy, who arrived in the meantime, stated, 
while talking to Horan, said he smelt the odor 
of liquor on his breath. Asked if he thought 
he was incapacited for duty the chief thought 
not. Lvnch, who had the floor watch, stated 



Before leaving the Board room Wednesday 

: night every member of the commission, in- 

, eluding Chief Murphy, tendered their best 

wishes for the future guidance of Lieutenant 

Frank Smith, particularly Commissioner 

Brandenstein, who said: "Lieutenant, as an 

officer of the fire department, in order to 

maintain your position and the respect of 

your men you must not become too familiar 

with them if you wish them to respect your 

orders; you must hold yourself aloof to a cer- 

' tain extent in order to maintain discipline." 

1 Frank Smith was the happiest man that 

walked out of the Board room Wednesday 

night. The Commissioners also commended 

Captain Muldowney as a man and a fireman. 

Last Monday night the Civil Service Com- 
mission adopted a resolution callirg upon the 
mayor and police and fire commissions to con- 
fer in an effort to secure an adjustment of 
the difficulties attending the recent court de- 
cision that the commission must submit the 
names of three applicants for a vacancy in- 
stead of only the highest one. 



ROSENBLUMABRAHAM CO. Inc. 

TAILORS FOR MBIN 

IIOS MARKET ST. 

ODD FELLOWS BUILDING 

Phone Market 1503 

UNIFORMS OUR SPECIALTY UNION LABEL USEO 



PACIFIC F1KEMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
June 20, we take the following excerpts from 
the Administrative Committee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From Geo. W. Harris, boilermaker at the 
corporation yard, requesting that he be al- 
lowed salary on account of an injury to his 
eye while in the discharge of duty on June 4. 
Granted. 

Your committee recommend that the fol- 
lowing rule relative to the proceedings of the 
Board be adopted: Whenever the chief en- 
gineer of the fire department shall file a re- 
port of the suspension by him of any member 
or employe of the department the secretary i 
of the Board shall submit such report at the 
next meeting, whether regular or special, of 1 
said Board. 

In the matter of the breaking of the door! 
leading into the dormitory of the house of 
truck 7 and engine 10, which was incorpo- 
rated in the complaint submitted by Battalion 
Chief Murphy at the last legular meeting of 
the Board against P. D. Horan, hoseman en- 
gine 10, your committee find, after an inves- 
tigation of the matter, that there is not suffi- 
cient evidence to warrant it in making auy re- 
commendation for action whatsoever against 
any member of the companies stationed there. 

From S. S. Gill, clerk and commissary, re- 
questing that he be granted permission to 
visit his family in Sonoma county at the end 
of each week, returning on Mondays, during 
the months of June and July. Granted. 

From Geo. H. Knorp, requesting that he 
be granted permission to visit his family after 
working hours, while they are residing in 
Marin county during the month of July. 
Granted. 

From N. Perrone, hoseman engine 20, re- 
questing that he be allowed salary on account 
of an injury to his ankle, received while 
working at the quarters of engine 5 on April 
24. Granted. 

From A. A. McCarte, truckman truck 12, 
tendering his resignation as a member of the 
department, to take effect from date. Ac- 
cepted. 

Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

From John Farrell, driver engine 8, re- I 
questing a leave of absence for 00 days, with 
pay, with permission to leave the city, on 
account of sickness. Granted 30 days. 

From the chief engineer, reporting having 
■depended Wm. H. Lynch, hoseman engine 
10, for failing to report to his superior officer 
tin' mutilating of the company journal on the 
3rd hint. Put over o in' week. 

Resolution requesting temporary appoint, 
ments for the month ol July, where there i 
are no Civil Service eligibles available. 
Approved. 

Thursday night, in responding to an alarm 
the hose wagon of engine 17, in charge of 
Captain Ward and A. Pendesky, a new man, 
in coming out of Mint avenue, the wagon 
striking the street car tracks on Filth street 



with such force that the apparatus was over- 
turned. The five men on the wagon were 
hurled to the pavement. Ward and Pendesky 
sustained fractured arms and lacerations. 
The men of the crew were more or less 
bruised. Ward and Pendesky were taken to 
St. Joseph's Hospital by Assistant Chief 
Maxwell. 



Civil Service Must Certify Three Names. 

Last Saturday, June 14, Judge Murasky of 
the Superior Court granted the application of 
Lieut. Allen Matlock, a member of engine 
company 40, forawritof mandate compelling 
the Civil Service Commission to certify three 
names of eligible lieutenants from which to 
select one captain, Matlock's own name be- 
third on the list. 

Judge Murasky, in a written opinion, said: 

"It is undoubtedly the intention of the 
charter that the appointing board shall have 
the right of selection from among those found 
upon examination to be qualified to serve. 
Such is the spirit of Civil Service reform. 
But the method pursued by the defendants 
would make them the appointing body, and 
take from the Fire Commissioners the au- 
thority expressly vested in it by the charter. 

' 'The duties of the Civil Service Commission 
are limited to the examination of applicants 
and the certification to the proper board of 
the names of those who have been found to 
be eligible. The very purpose of Civil Service 
legislation in this respect is to separate the 
power of appointment from the power of ex- 
amining in order that the duty of examining 
might be free from embarrassments which 
might attend the power to appoint and, on 
the other hand, that the appointing boara 
should be restricted to those applicants 
whose qualifications had been ascertained by 
an independent body. The action of the 
Civil Service Commissioners would subvert 
this purpose. 

"The amendment might have been drawn 
so as to exclude all doubt as to its construc- 
tion, but when read in relation to its purpose, 
I think it is plain that it is the duty of the 
defendants to submit to the Fire Commissioti 
the names of all applicants, not exceeding 
three, who have the highest rating for pro- 
motion. 

"If there be but two who qualify, then 
only two may be certified, and where but one 
is found fit then only his name may be sub- 
mitted; but where more than one qualify, 
the board, in submitting only one name, is not 
complying with the provision of Section 8, 
Article XIII of the Charter." 

The ('barter provides that the Civil Service 
Commission shall submit to the appointing 
power the names of not exceeding three ap- 
plicants having 'he nighest rating for each 
promotion. Although Matlock's name was 
among the three highest eligibles the com- 
missioners refused to submit his name to the 
Fire Commission, placing before that body 
i he name of only one lieutenant. 

The certifying of three nanus. Commis- 
sioner Brady holds, would pave the way for 
the Introduction of politics into thadep^rl 



ment, and might result repeatedly in the bist 
man being ignored for a political favorite. 

Commissioner Brady, it is said, will suggest 
to Mayor Rolph that he pursue the course 
taken by Mayor Gaynor in New York, bring- 
ing pressure to bear on the fire department 
to issue an order asking the Civil Service 
Commission to verify only one name. 

Truck 4 and 2 Play a Tie Game. 

A close and interesting game of baseball 
was played at North Beach play grounds 
Wednesday, June 17, between nines from 
truck 4 and truck 2, under the management 
I of Lieut. Brennan and Jack Lavaroni; Bren- 
nan acting for truck 4 and Lavaroni for truck 
2. Nine innings were played, resulting in a 
tie of 6 to 6. Thegame would have continued 
but Mr. Lundie having some special work on 
the grounds to attend to the game had to be 
called off, which caused much disappointment 
to both teams. Mr. Lundie stated the grounds 
were at the disposal of the fire boys any time 
they desired to play off the tie game. This 
the teams intend to do, and arrangements are 
now being made between the rival managers, 
Messrs. Brennan and Lavaroni. 

The game, taking it all in all, was a good 
one and every inning was exciting, each nine 
having their rooters and they lost no chance 
to root for their favorites. 

The features were the fly catch of Comber 
who, after a run down a hill, made a great 
catch; the hitting of H. Werham, Ed. Shea, 
Valente, Bowler and Remy; the battery work 
of Morgan and Nolan of truck 2 and Allen 
and Brennan of truck 4; also great credit is 
due Jack Haitnon who umpired the game, his 
decisions being fair and impartial and he had 
many close ,ones. Look, Jack! the Coast 
League is looking for good ump's. 

The line-up was as follows: 

Truck i Truck ;' 

Allen Pitcher Morgan 

Brennan. ' Catcher Nolan 

Linderber'g 1st Base Remy 

Shea 2nd Base Gallatin 

Bowler...^. 3rd Base Lavin 

Hughes Short Stop Hackett 

O'Neill Left Field Lavaroni 

Comber Center Field Werham 

Gavin Right Field Valente 

Andrews . ..Extras Perroni 

Subscribe for the Pacific Fireman. 



Telephone Douglas 1255 

U. J. BORCK, ™| ™y>g 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

PIKEMEN'S '. ' UNIFORMS 

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151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries BROWN& KENNEDY LOTS $150 

FLORAL 



$150 LOTS 



Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts, 



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Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Al; 

ornamental and Hovering plants in variety. 
Special atU ntion given to Wtddvno ">"' Flint ml ' h-d. n 
Artistic Dteorationa and Vet 
Gardening, /•."/»■. 

TELEPHONE MISSION ISS3 

To RKACH Nt'RSEitlES. take Castro street car to 23rd, u 

Mission, 2Hh street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Doug-lass and 2-1 th streets. 




Phones 



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Importers and Manufacturers 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1118 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 
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Phone Douslas -1716 



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LOWEST rRICES 

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NEAR VALENCIA 
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Firemen's Turnout Sails Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



WM. F. EGAN 

M. R. C, V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 

1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

ri'lenhtinea I'M* 117 and 118 San Francisco, CI. 



Marine View Terrace 

(THE PIEDMONT OF RICHMOND) 
DON'T" 

let this opportunity pass by. This is absolutely 
your last chance to get close in property at such 
prices and terms. 

Only seven minutes walk from the 
City Hall. Ashland Avenue will reach 
Marine View Terrace through the rr.i_r.icir al 
tunnel and continue on through, the entire length 
of the property to the new feny from which boats 
will run regularly to and from San Francisco. 

Bonds have been sold and the money is 
now in the hands of the City Treasurer fcr the 
immediate construction of these imi rcverr i r.'s 
and values will dcuble and treble in a very 
short time. 

Don't delay buy now instead of 
wishing you had later on. 

For maps or further information, see or write 

WENHAJV1 & PAUL 



1444 San Pablo Ave. 



OakLnd, California 





IREMAN 




VOL. X.-NO. 30 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JUNE 14, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Veteran Firemen's Association. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Veteran Firemen's Association of San 
Francisco was held at headquarters, 
368 Fell street, Tuesday, June 3. All 
of the officers, directors and a large 
number of members answered roll 
call. The following sick were re- 
ported, viz: Bell, Mooney, McAdoo, 
Farrell, Balk, Gibson, O'Brien, Drury 
and Muldowney. The death of Com- 
rade Chris C. Cox was also reported, 
he having died May 1 at New York 
city from an attack of paralysis. The 
secretary was instructed to send a 
letter of condolance to the widow. 
There were two applications for mem- 
bership received and referred. Sev- 
eral communications were received, 
attended to and filed. Bills to the 
amount of $303.95 were ordered paid. 
The committee on picnic made a very 
favorable progressive report. The 
committee on revision and compilation 
of the new laws reported the comple- 
tion of the same and on motion were 
passed to print. Receipts for the 
evening, $720.50. Total cash assets 
to date, $2407.44. Under the head of 
Good and Welfare a social hour was 
spent. C unlade James E. Britt ren- 
dered a humorous recitation and fol- 
li.v'd in his imitable style the old 
favorite song, "Peggy in the Low 
Back Car;" Comrade Geo. F. Brown 
mule a very interesting talk pertain- 
ing lo the uplift of the association, 
advocating the promulgating move of 
the social feature; Comrade Hensley 
was well up in a few witty and local 
hits, and Comrades Cox, Williams. 
Farley and others gave good and 
timely suggestions. The meeting ad- 
journed in peace and harmony. 



A Limerick, Ireland, jury at the in- 
quest on a fatal fire in a dry goods 
store in that city where three lives 
were lost, severely censured the cor- 
poration for lack of fire alarms, tele- 
phonic communication and other 
means of allowing the fire brigade to 
deal promptly with a fire. Con- 
siderable delay arose in notifying the 
brigade of the fire, and when it ar- 
rived on the scene the flames were too 
fierce to admit of the firemen entering 
the building, from which the proprie- 
tor of the store and an assistant had 
previously been rescued by means of 
ladders. 



An official test of Santa Clara's new 
Seagrave auto fire truck was made last 
week and was witnessed by the Gilroy 
officials, the local trustees and a large 
delegation of firemen. A heap of 
barrels, 20 feet high, was saturated 
with coal oil and when thoroughly 
ablaze a silent alarm was turned in. 
Within 78 seconds the Seagrave truck 
was at the scene of the fire (a distance 
of one-half mile) and the chemical hose 
in operation. It was accepted at the 
next regular meeting of the Trustees. 

At last week's meeting of the Police 
Commission Policeman Louis La Place 
was complimented and commended 
officially for bravery. Two weeks ago 
a fire broke out on La Place's beat. 
He turned in an alarm and ran to the 
fire. He not only stem mi d a panic by 
directing the outrush of inmates of 
the burning house, but four times 
went through the flames and brought 
out a woman who would have been 
burned to death. President Roche 
paid a high tribute to the officer. 



The Times of San Mateo says Hills- 
borough will soon have a force of fifty 
trained firemen, who, like the ancient 
"minute men," will be ready at all 
times to respond to the first alarm of 
fire. In preparation for the active 
service of these men the trustees at 
the meeting last week authorized the 
purchase of fifty fire badges as evi- 
dence of authority and expected 
duty of fifty deputy marshals to be 
sworn in for this special service. 



The David Campbell. Portland's 
new fireboat, was recently given its 
first official test when it cruised 
around the harbor with many city 
officials and prominent citizens on 
board. The run was for the purpose 
of showing off the vessel more than to 
demonstrate its fire fighting possibili- 
ties, but all on board were convinced 
that the boat met the requirements. 

A Spokane paper says a record run 
was recently made by the firemen of 
engine company 10 of the department 
with the new Seagrave combination 
pumper and hose automobile. In the 
space of three minutes they ran nine 
blocks, laid 450 feet of hose and had 
130 pounds pressure, and succeeded 
in saving a dwelling from destruc- 
tion. 

John Hansen, a porter at the McNutt 
Hospital, was arrested early last Mon- 
day morning, charged with arson, 
Two incendiary fires were started in 
Beale street shortly after midnight 
and Hansen was caught leaving Galla- 
gher Bros.' building. In his pockets 
were found numerous it iflan mable 
materials. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Leo Ditrichstein, his New York 
Company and the Alcazar players 
have scored such a success in "The 
Concert" that the charming- comedy 
will be at the O'Farrell-street theatre 
one more week, commencing next 
Monday night. The advance sale of 
seats presages another series of 
crowded audiences. By his wonder- 
ful characterization of the eccentric 
musician, Mr. Ditrichstein has gained 
the admiration of San Francisco's 
play-patrons, his acting stamping him 
as a light comedian of first rank. 
Isabel Irving, Cora Witherspoon, 
Madge West, Anne Livingston, Alice 
Patek, Anna McNaughton, Louis Ben- 
nison and Burt Wesner also contri- 
bute mightily to the magnetism of 
the performance. Even the "geese," 
the adoring pupils who turn the pia- 
nist's head, are perfect portrayals of 
the type of female that gushes over 
great musicians and can be seen at 
any recital where a much-heralded 
virtuso appears. There cannot possi- 
bly be a third week of "The Concert," 
as Mr. Ditrichstein's newest comedy, 
"Such is Life," must be produced 
Monday evening after next. 

Empress Theatre. 

Jimmy Britt, former lightweight 
boxer, reconteur, globe trotter, cos- 
mopolitan and clever little actor, will 
be the headline attraction at the Em- 
press Sunday afternoon. He furnishes 
a splendid monologue, if advance press 
notices may be trusted. The extra 
added feature on the new bill is pre- 
sented by "The Nine Piano Bugs," 
instrumentalists, vocalists and come- 
dians who mingle with the audience 
in making merry. Agnes Lee and a 
capable cast will present a virile rural 
drama, "The Test," written by W. F. 
Sailor, a St. Paul newspaper man. 
Charlotte, a charming and accom- 
plished violiniste, will offer character 
studies and popular and classic selec- 
tions. "Fun on the Boulevard" is the 
offering of The Wheelers & Company, 
who present a comedy juggling act. 
Edward Barnes and Mabel Robinson, 
musical comedy purveyors, have a 
melange containing ragtime, maud 
opera and Shakespearean travesty. 
Forrest Stone and Grace Young, are 
singers and dancers of ability. 



A United Press dispatch of June 9 
says the entire northeast section of 
Springfield, Mo., was swept by fire 
which caused financial lossesestimated 
at $750,000 before it was controlled. 
Fanned by a high wind the flames 
spread rapidly and for a time threat- 
ened the entire city. 

Petaluma's gasoline auto delivery 
truck took fire one day last week and 
was nearly destroyed, but was extin- 
guished by the motor chemical of the 
fire department. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



T. H. KILOO 

DIAMONDS AMI) JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST. SAN FRANCIS) « 

Phone Mnrill 4447 

H. G WILLIAMS 

AiT'-nt Northern California fur the 



DON'T MISS THIS! 

$10.00 down 
$5.00 a month 

Buys a Lot in Beautiful 

Fairfax Heights 

ACROSS THE ROAD 



THE best attention and service for the man who car- 
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watch, but because he is likely to be that kind 
of a man. 

Th-- possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does kujjt- 
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know whether he is netting - it or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk tu 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth 'what you i 
pay for it. 

Tin- price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tor v. anil a print t-d ticket attached— from the 
17-jewel (double roller* in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at M0, to the 23- 
jewel at J150 — ami the Edward Howard model 
. . 

Admiral EUgsbee has written n little book. 
■'The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record of his- own Howard In the U S Navj 
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and we'll send you a copy 

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M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. I). 

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telephones t'urk 117 and llf San Francisco, * el 



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Joints and all Blood Diseases 



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^hen You're Buy in'. Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

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unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

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V A C 1 F I C F 1 K E M A N 




Ptllll.LSHBD EVERY SATURDAY 

Bl 

IAS K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

lu win. in nil checks and money orders should 

In- nindf payable. 

II. G. PRESTON Business Mananer 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

I'm v .-at. in advance $2 00 

si\ montlis 7 lid 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

liisiMi.-iI in, the must favorable terms, especially largeand 

continuous ones. 

editorial Rooms atid Business otrice. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francis co. Telephone Franklin S867. 

Entered as Recoiid-clafw rnatterMarch 21. 1908. at the 
PnatonW at San Fi anoise-.,. Cat., under IheActofCon- 

Lii-ss of March ::. is7<e 

The Portland Fire Department has a well 
equipped hi-ass: h;.n<] of an pieces, made up 
exclusively of members of the department. 
Thev exi.wt to escort Chief B. F. Dowell to 
the New York con vent inn of the International 
Association of Fire Chiefs. 

The fireboats are the only vessels on the 
bay that have no vibration, hence when the 
engineer gels a bell to go ahead or reverse, 
he has no assurance that the vessel is com- 
plying; with the bell. If the boats were 
equipped with marine semaphones this would 
be obviated and many serious dangers, which 
is liahle to happen costing thousandsof dollars, 
would be avoided. 

According to an elaborate tabulated state- 
ment, published in the Fireman's Herald of 
June 7, giving the record and per capita fire 
loss for 1912, says that Savannah, Ga., had 
the smallest and Houston, Tex., the largest 
per capita fire loss. The table shows thirty 
cities exceeded $5 for each inhabitant, while 
fifteen cities show only 40 cents or less. The 
statement also gives statistics of other large 
cities. 

Chief Murphy, at last week's meeting of 
the Fire Commission, paid quite a compliment 
to Hosemun Woodman before the close of the 
meeting, saying: "This man is one of the 
best firemen in the department and a good 
provider to his family, turning over every 
dollar of his salary to his wife every month." 
After which the chief cautioned him, telling 
him to obey till orders of his superior officers, 
th-tt it was not for him to question the right 
or wrong in the matter— that was up to the 
officer who gave lite orders. 

The Board of Directors of the Los Angeles 
Firemen's Relief Association has ordered 
petitions circulated among the members of 
the association to obtain ihe necessary signa- 
tures to call an election to despense with the 
services of the association doctor, claiming 
that to provide medical attention for its 350 
members they should have two or more 
doctors, and this the Board says is out of the 
question with its limited revenues. If the 
association votes to despense with the ser- 
vices of the doctor it will mean an increase in 
the funeral benefit of front $150 to $250. 



The American-La France auto combination 
chemical and hose wagon which recently met 
with an accident at its first official test, was 
given another tryout last Monday before 
many fire department officials and motor fire 
apparatus people. Many miles were covered 
in the run, both up and down steep hills and 
level roads. The California-street hill, at its 
steepest ascent, was navigated at a speed of 
a little over 21 miles an hour. The machine 
in its run out at Ocean boulevard attained a 
speed of 58 miles an hour, and we understand 
its specifications only called for 50. 

The Fireman's Herald, editorially comment- 
ing on Judge Murasky's recent decision 
eliminating physical test examinations for 
assistant chiefs, closes its comments with the 
following: "The assistant chief of a large 
fire department is more valuable for his brains 
and experience than (or his thews and sinews. 
We think that the men who have the best 
right to speak on the subject will hold thatan 
assistant chief who tries to do the work of a 
fireman is failing in his duty — which is to 
know how to direct his men and to direct them 
to the best advantage. Mentally, he should 
be at his best; physically, he must be able to 
withstand exposure for hours at a stretch. 
If he can do the latter, it really i.s of no con- 
sequence how many or few times he can 
"chin" himself." 



Around the Bay Cities. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

The Citv Council of Richmond has voted to 
expend $28,500 on an up-to dale fire alarm 
system. The plans call for filty-five alarm 
boxes and twenty-five police boxes, together 
with flash lights, signal box* s, etc. 

Chief Briones of the Martinez Fire Depart, 
ment has tendend his resignation to the 
Board of Trustees and W. Hannaberry has 
been elected to the position. 

In regard to the controversy over the pur- 
chase of a machine for Chief Steinmetz, the 
Alameda Council has rescinded all action 
taken towards its purchase. The automobile 
has been in commission for the past few 
weeks and has been accepted by the Police 
and Fire Commission. The automobile com- 
pany will now bring suit to recover payments. 

The firemen and citizens of Hayward at- 
tended the funeral of Hayward's first fire 
chitf, T. C. Ward, who recently died in the 
East. Arrangements for the funeral were 
made by Chief Riggs, the present head of 
the depart ment 

The modernizing of the San Leandro Fire 
Department has began in earnest. A large 
iron bell tower has been erected by the fire 
house, anil Chief Eber and the Trustees have 
Visited some of the larger departments around 
ihe bay to secure information on the combi- 
nation chemical and hose wagons that the de- 
partments have m use. It is their intention 
to purchase an auto combination chemical and 
hose wagon, as the present apparatus is 
totally inadequate to meet the needs of a 
growing city like San Leandro 

Subscribe for the Pacific Fireman. 



American-La France Motor App: i ; ilus 

The Portland (Ore. | Fire Department < ffii ials 
are certainly pinning their faith in An ctici.n- 
La France motor apparatus. Three of their 
auto combination chemical and hose wtigors 
were recently tested with very sat isf: cioty 
results, when tried out before a crowd of city 
officials and fire apparatus men. Owing to 
the showing made by the three machines five 
similar machines were ordertd I hn i gh A. G. 
Long, which are soon to arrive ft cm the 
factory, making eight in all. 

The San Francisco department row hi s six 
machines similar to the above, while ihe Fire 
Insurance Patrol has three, all of litem gi\it g 
efficient results. Along about the last of July 
the big aerial truck i.s due to arrive from the 
Elmira factory. 

It is estimated that about 10 per cent of 
I the San Francisco Fire Department is now 
motorized. 

A protest against public charges of graft 
iti the Denver Fire Department was regis- 
tered recently with District Attorney Ji l.n 
Rush by Chief J. J. Healv and hisdepily s nd 
assistant chiefs. The graft sh ry hinlid at 
had its origin in employment of Captains 
Cooper and Normile to lobby in the general 
assembly for Ihe passage of a liren.eii's 
pension bill ill which the department was 
interested. The two captains received son e 
expense money from ihe funds of the Fire- 
men's Prjtective Association, an organizaih n 
not controlled by department, i rhciab. Tie- 
proposed pension bill failed to be passed 1 y 
the State lawmakers. 



Chief Budd Eber of San Leandro st me few- 
weeks ago handed his resignation to I he Boat tl 
of Trustees, to take effect immediately. While 
the demands of the chief and members of ihe 
fire department for fire apparatus had tut 
entirely been ignored, the city is slow in taking 
action, which finally worked upon the chief 
and the firemen until they all threatened to 
resign if some action was not fori hcominp. 
It has been claimed that if the city had 
equipped the fire department with adequate 
fire apparatus, the serious accident lhat befell 
Assistant Chief J. J. Bailey might not have 
happened. Chief Eber as well as other mem- 
bers of the department do not feel that they 
want to remain in the department if thev are 
not supplied with apparatus. The Board of 
Trustees refused to accept the resignation of 
the chief, and in all probability will get to- 
gether and decide on some definite plan to 
equip the department. 

John Tulsa, a fireman of Tulsa, Okla., will 
not quit the city's fire department, in spite 
of the fact that by Ihe death of an uncle in 
Illinois he has come in for a legacy of $20,000. 



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PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
June 13, we take the following excerpts from 
the Administrative Committee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From Chas. B. Rogers, driver engine 37, 
requesting that he be granted an extension of 
his leave of absence for six months, commenc- 
ing June 12, with permission to leave the city, 
on account of sickness. Granted. 

From J. J. Flood, hoseman engine 24, re- 
questing that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence fur two weeks, with permission to leave 
the city, on account of sickness. Granted. 

From the Pacific Coast Association of Fire 
Chiefs, requesting that the chief engineer of 
this department be delegated to attend the 
next annual convention of said association, to 
be held at Tacoma during the last week of 
August. Recommend that a communication 
be forwarded to the Board of Supervisors re- 
questing that a resolution be adopted author- 
izing this Board to make a suitable appro- 
priation for this purpose out of its appropria- 
tion for the next fiscal year. 

From Battalion Chief Britt, submitting a 
complaint against Wm. Sawyer, hoseman en- 
gine 17, for failing to report back to his 
company for duty at theexpiration of a leave 
of absence on June 7. Sawyer appeared be- 
fore your committee and pleaded guilty, and 
in view of his previous good record your 
committee recommend that he be deprived of 
pay only for the time he was off duty without 
leave. Sawyer also waived the privilege of 
appearing before the Board at the meeting 
when this matter is considered, as provided 
by rule of this Board. 

From Eugene McCormick, lieutenant engine 
24, requesting that he be granted a leave of 
absence for fifteen days, with permission to 
leave the city, on account of sickness, com- 
mencing June 111. Granted. 

Prom the chief engineer, recommending 
that the Spring Valley Water Company be 
requested to set a five inch hydrant at the 
northwest corner of Twentieth and Sanchez 
streets. Approved. 

From the chief engineer, reporting having 
suspended I'. D. Horan, hoseman engine 10, 
on Lhe 4lh instant for absenting himself from 

quarters after 10 o'clock p. m., for using 
abusive language to his superior officer and 
for mutilating tin- Compunj Journal on the 
3rd inyi ( Charges ordered tiled. 

From th.' < -tii.'f engineer, reporting having 
suspended W. II. Lynch, hoseman engine HI, 
for failing lo report the facl of the Company 
Journal having been mutilated on the 3rd 
instant, to his superior officer. Recommend 
mutter be referred lo tin- Board forbearing 
without recommendation, said hearing to 
take place after the charges against IV I). 
Horan have been heard, and that Lynch he 
restored to duly pending the hearing of said 
complaint. 

From Battalion Chief Cook, submitting 1 a 
complainst against Charles Shay, hoseman 
engine 12, for failing to report for duty on 
time at the expiration of a leave "f absence 



on June 8. Shay appeared before the com- 
mittee and stated that he was called to 
Vallejo the day previous on business and 
missed the evening train, and was two hours 
late in reporting for duty the following morn- 
ing. In view of bis previous good record, 
this being his first offense, your committee 
recommend that the complaint be dismissed. 

From Acting Battalion Chief Riley, sub- 
mitting a report of an accident to the appa- 
ratus of engine 5, while responding to an 
alarm of fire on the 8th inst. Filed. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, sub- 
mitting a report of an accident whereby G. 
W. Harris, boilermaker at the corporation 
yard, sustained an injury to his eye. while in 
the discharge of his duty on June 4. Filed. 

From John T. Lahev, lieutenant engine 18, 
requesting, that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for one year, without pay, commenc- 
ing June 14. Referred to the Board for action 
without recommendation. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the Department of Electricity be re- 
quested to install a tapper and register at the 
Twin Peaks reservoir station; also that the 
Board of Supervisors be requested to have 
the Pacific Telephone and. Telegraph Company 
install an extension telephone from the quar- 
ters of engine 40 to said station. Approved. 

From George Healy engine 17, requesting 
that he be allowed a leave of absence for 
fifteen days without pay. Granted. 

Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

From John T. Lahey, lieutenant engine 18. 
requesting that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for one year, without pay, commencing 
June 14. Granted 30 days. 

From the chief engineer, reporting having 
suspended W. H. Lynch, hoseman engine 10, 
for failing to report to his superior officer the 
mutilating of the Company Journal on the 3rd 
instant. Put over to Wednesday. 

The matter of authorizing the secretary to 
issue a requisition to Marshal-Newel! Co. to 
deliver in Septembnr, 1912, certain supplies 
to the corporation yard, costing $268.32, 
caused con iderable' discussion. After- hear- 
ing Superintendent of Engines Bermingham, 
Pat Brandon ami George Rnorp explain, 
Hammer and Pfatffle voted "yes," while 
Dillon voted "no." 

From the chief engineer, calling attention 
1.0 lire fact that no provision has been made 
in the budget for 1918 14 for- the position of 
first assistant chief engineer in connection 
with the auxiliary high pressure system. 
Filed, 

Approval of specifications covering installa- 
iion of and equipping [ireboats with marine 
engine semaphores. Put over and referred 

lo I I href. 

At San Diego June Hi, four persons nar- 
rowly escaped death when a combination 
bakery and rooming house was destroyed l»v 

lire, every cupanl leaping from the win- 
dows, some of them in their nighl clothing, 

and losing all of l heir- personal belongings. 



Union City, Mich., up to May 1 had not had 
a fire in 12 months. In 12 months ending May 
1, 1912, it had only two fires. The population 
of the town is 1500. 

The Union Steam Fire Engine Company of 
Lambertville, N. J., as a means to"raise funds 
for their new equipment, has a stand in front 
of the fire house and sell frankfurters. 



The Seattle Fire Department recently or- 
dered a 75-foot motor-propelled Seagrave 
aerial ladder truck and two motor-propellid 
Seagrave city service combination hook and 
ladder and chemical trucks. 

The breaking of the strap which held him 
to his seat was all that saved Driver Martini 
of engine 5 from serious injury when his 
engine toppled over at Dupont and Washington 
streets last Sunday. 

The following ad appeared in the last issue 
of the Los Angeles Firemen's World, official 
organ of the Firemen's Relief Association of 
that department: "For Sale. One Single 
Breated Uniform Coat. A Bargain at $10.00. 
See Roussell at Engine Company No. 23." 

In petitioning for an increase in compensa- 
j tion, the firemen of Cincinnati, Ohio, submit 
the following comparative scale: Cleveland — 
! Captains, $1,458 a year; lieutenants, $1,308; 
engineers, $1,440; stokers, $1,284; pipemen, 
' $1,284. Cincinnati-Captains, 1,332; lieuten- 
ants, $1,180; engineers, $1,272; stokers, $1,152, 
and pipemen, $1,152. 

Battalion Chief Britt, while responding to 
an alarm of fire last Saturday afternoon was 
run into at the corner of Grant avenue and 
Market street by engine 17's hose wagon, 
spilling himself and Opeiator Nolan out and 
demolishing the chief's buggy, the chief es- 
caping without injury, and Nolan receiving a 
few slight bruises. The horse sustained no 
injury. 

Matt Brown, a recent pensioner of this de- 
partment, formerly a member of engine com- 
pany 8. has gone into the real estate business. 
He looks ten years younger since his retire- 
ment. "How do you account for your youth- 
ful appearance?" we asked. "Well, the in- 
harmony and friction among firemen in fire 
houses worked so on my nerves that I was 
unable to enjoy my meals at home, but now 
I feel line," said he, with a smile. 



Tekphoae Donah 1255 

L. J. BORCK, m ' AILOk 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

RlWEIVlEfN'S V U!NlHOI-?M« 

Al.sa II m: CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



Home ptionr S 2SI7 

The Little Emporium 

L. KI/NH PropiHM 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

VNDl '.ii I !'•' i *''' < lALTi 
2296 os (it ARV SIMM I 

N«-.it hf.-Vtul. 
I al«ph«M Wtf *HM SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



American -La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 

151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 






Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



BROWN & KENNEDY LOTS $150 

FLORAL 



$150 LOTS 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 

Fresh cut (lowers and licnu.t- always on hand. Als 

ornamental and llowerinfj plants in variety. 

Sprrtul tittentum ijirtu I" 11'. <l<l niu "'id t'tiininl (Viler. 

Artistic Itecorationa ami l>anffia. 

rianlntina. '•.''■'. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

Tn Kkach NIIRSEkIES, lake Caslm Bin et car to 231*1, 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 2-lth streets. 




112 S. Sprmg Si. 
Los Angeles 



717 K Street 
Sacramento 



EAGLESON & CO. 



A 
R 

T 
I 
S 

T 
S 

. HantM 1615 
' Market 5723 

FUNERAL WORK A SPECIALTY 

LOWEST PRICES 

3091 SIXTEENTH STREET 

NEAR VALENCIA 
UNION STORE SAN FRANCISCO 




EASY TERMS 



Importe-s and \1anulaclureri 



Telephone Douijla, 287 I 



rC -1992 



MENS FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

I I 18 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 
Phone Market 5417 SAN FRANCISCO 



Home C 2458 



Phone Douslai 4716 

LAMANETBROS 

HATS. UNDKRWEAR. HTC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits dents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



WAkRANT BROKIRS 



630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



\A/M. F. 



:gan 



M. K. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D. 

1155 UOI.OEN OATH AVE. 

Telephones Hark 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



=I1N= 

Marine View Terrace 

(THE PIEDMONT OF RICHMOND) 
DON'T 

let this opportunity pass by. This is absolutely 
yout last chance to get close in property at such 
prices and terms. 

Only seven minutes walk from the 
City Hall. Ashland Avenue will reach 
Marine View Terrace through tie municipal 
tunnel and continue on through the <nt re It r £ ih 
of the property to ihe new (eny (rom v> hich beats 
will run regularly to and Irom San Francisco. 

Bonds have heen sold and the money is 
now in the hands o( the Cily Treasurer lor ihe 
immediate constructicn ol these improvements 
and values will double and treble in a very 
short time. 

Don't delay— buy now instead of 
wishing you had later on. 

For maps or (utther information, see or write 

WENHAM & PAUL 

1444 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, California 




VOL. X.-NO. 32 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JUNE 28, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



The Saving in Motor Fire 
Apparatus 

By Chief A. J. Aung9t. East Liverpool, Ohio. 

I have never had a very good repu- 
tation as a public speaker. Therefore 
I will prepare a paper giving my 
versions on motorization of our fire 
department. After three years' ex- 
perience with motor apparatus, giving 
this and horse apparatus a close study, 
both from the financial and practical 
standpoint, including reliability and 
quickness, and after becoming fami- 
liar with our own conditions here, I 
recommend the motorization of our 
entire department. The first consid- 
eration comes before the taxpayers. 
They think that here is another bond 
issue and extra taxes. Mayor Mar- 
shall, Safety Director Joseph Wilson, 
the present safety director, Frank 
McNutt; President of the Council 
Hughes and six councilmen, after a 
thorough investigation, decided as I 
did that it. was a business proposi- 
tion. I will endeavor to give you 
some figures that are correct, showing 
financial considerations in motoriza- 
tion of the fire department. 

We have 14 head of horses in our de- 
P'lrtmont. The average cost per horse 
to shoe, feed and veterinary service, 
is $19. -14 each month. This would h< 
a total of $272.16 per month for the 1 : 
head, or $3,265.92 per year. The 
average life of a horse is four years. 
This would mean at least three new 
horses a year, barring accidents, at 
$800 per head, or $900 a year. New 
stall fl iors, new apparatus room doors, 
wear and tear on buildings, soap, gold 



dust and incidentals cost at least $150 
a year. This brings the total for 
horses to $4,315.92 a year. Where we 
now have two men in our outside fire 
stations we should have four. At 
central we should have at least 12 
men instead of eight. In getting mo- 
tors we will have the services of the 
driver of each machine. This will 
practically give us four more men. 
This will mean a saving to the city of 
$3,648 a year. If horses were used it 
would mean a total added cost to the 
city of $7,963.92. The cost of motors 
will average as follows: Chief's auto, 
$6 per month; one triple combination 
chemical, hose and engine, $4 per 
month; one aerial truck motor-driven 
automatic hoist, to extend 75 feet 
above the ground, $3 a month; three 
combination chemical and hose wa- 
gons, one each for the East End, West 
End and Northside stations. $3 a 
month. This, a total cost of $24 a 
month, or $288 a year, represents a 
total yearly saving of $7,675.92. 

There is absolutely no reason why 
motor apparatus should not last 15 
years with the care they will receive 
in the fire department. The average 
mileage will be only about. 200 miles a 
year, after the fir.'-t s-ix months, as 
each motor will probably he run sev- 
eral hundred miles in teaching the 
men their proper use. The average 
mileage made by n otor cais is from 
3.000 to 5.000 a year. A motor wa- 
gon, the first piece of motor apparatus 
of its kind ever built, was retired the 
other day after being in service 12 
years. At New Haven. Conn., this 
was built on an ordinary truck. 
Therefore I will base all my figures 



on 15 years. 1 The total saving for 15 
years is $115,138.80. From this we 
will deduct the interest on $33,000 
worth of bonds. These are to be paid 
off at the rate of $3,000 a year. This 
would be $10,050. This would leave 
$105,088. Deduct the bond issue of 
$33,000 and we have $72,088.80- 
enough to requip our fire department 
and $39,088 of a balance. These 
figures look large, but anyone is at 
liberty to investigate for themselves. 
I know that they will soon come to 
see that these are facts. The reason 
the saving is so large is because you 
are not running your fire autos every 
day, while with horses you are com- 
pelled to feed them if you have only 
one run a month. 

Motor fire apparatus designed and 
made by motor fire apparatus builders, 
not built on commercial trucks or 
touring car chases, constructed as 
they were at first, are more reliable 
than horses. I will state to you a few 
of my experiences with horses. We 
had a triple combination chemical and 
hose engine located two miles from 
the central portion of the city, a com- 
bination chemical and hose wagon 
located seven-tenths of a mile from 
the central portion of the city, all 
horse drawn. The motor apparatus 
would beat the hot so-drawn apparatus 
to this point with about equal grades 
For both. We have gone through mud 
axle deep with the motor apparatus 
and through 30 inches of snow, 20 
miles an hour with roads unbroken, 
while horses were compelled to walk 
or go a few yards and then rest. We 
have gene through the mud and then 
pulled the horse apparatus through. 



PACIFIC F1KEMAN 



We have pulled the horse apparatus 
through the snow for over a mile 
when the latter was disabled. We 
have gone down 11 per cent grades, 
over a glare of ice, while the horses, 
shod sharp, would slide all over the 
streets. This would also be duplicated 
in the steel tires of the horse appara- 
tus. Horses, while crossing street 
railway tracks, will slip and fall, 
breaking their legs and injuring men. 
Horses will run away, harness will 
break, snaps part or become un- 
snapped. A dozen other things may 
happen that only a fireman of expe- 
rience can tell you, and of which the 
public has no knowledge. With the 
motor apparatus you have three ways 
to control these things. One by the 
foot brake; second, by the emergency 
brake; third, by throwing the motor 
in first or second speed and braking 
on the motor. The largest number of 
accidents with motor apparatus occur 
in turning corners. This I have elimi- 
nated by making the drivers responsi- 
ble for any accident of this kind. He 
must turn the corners slow, same as 
with horse apparatus. A man to drive 
horses must use muscles and brains. 
You can train horses every day to 
come to their harness and yet they 
are not reliable. They may cr me out, 
turn around, and then run back in the 
stall; they may come out and knock 
down their harness; they may be 
headstrong and not get under the 
harness. Tben it takes at least six 
months to break in a horse any way 
near right. With the late motor we 
have the electric starter; also two 
separate and distinct ways of ignition. 
So. if one fails, the other can be re- 
lied upon. 

The motor fire apparatus is three 
times quicker than horses. This alone 
is the secret of the fire business, and 
was the reason why we proceeded 
from the volunteer to the paid fire 
d ■; Mi-tment : frrm the hard to the 
horse-drawn apt aratus. Even ihojjgh 
it were not a saving, this cue feature 
should he uppern ott in the mil d of 
any public-spirited citizen — to protect 
his loved ones, whether it be in a 
business block, theatre or at his home: 
and if by getting to a fire one minute 
sooner we can save a life, the money 
is well spent. A motor truck will gei 



out of the house in from four to eight 
seconds, while with horses the best 
time made in this department is 12 
seconds. In going up our hills we are 
compelled to walk our horses, as the 
load is too heavy to drive fast. The 
motor will make from 20 to 35 miles 
per hour going up the hills. In com- 
ing down these hills we are compelled 
to stop and put a shoe under the 
wheels; then take them out when we 
Ret to the bottom. With the motor 
we can go down hill at the rate of 
from 10 to 15 miles an hour without 
delay, and at the same time have better | 
control than with horses. As we do 
now with horses, we run two compa- 
nies to each fire, and three companies 
into the congested districts. If one 
company should get disabled the other 
company is going on to the fire. Or, 
in the congested district, we can get 
the fire out before it gets large. 
This same method would he used on 
motor trucks, thus insuring one com- 
pany reaching the tire. Motor appa- 
ratus will mean that there will he one 
company in our congested district in 
less than 30 seconds; three companies 
in less than three minutes, and one 
company in any part of the city in 
less than three minutes. This will in- 
crease the efficiency of this fire depart- 
ment at least 75 per cent. 

The engine houses will he more 
healthy for the men to sleep in; the 
men's re;-t will not he so disturbed as 
now, with horses pawing in the stalls; 
it will give them more time in which 
to drill and to study the businest^ as 
well as for inspection work. As pro- 
posed with this bond issue, there will 
be bought a chief's auto, carrying a 
couple of fire extinguishers, axes, 
ropes, smoke helmets and two men 
besides the chief. On all runs in l he 
residence district this will reinforce 
the outside companies by three men. 
A triple combination chemical, hose 
and engine is so constructed that the 
same power that laki-s \<u to a tire 
can pump water. In case of a low 
pressure or big lire, the pressure cai 
he run up from any point to 200 pounds; 
or, in case a main should break, we 
can pull water from the river, and we 
always have a fire engine read\ Foi 
work at a moment's notice with no 
i expense to the city except when Bsed. 



BUY A LOT IN 

BEAUTIFUL FAIRFAX KEHiKTS 

AT THE STATION OF FAIRFAX 
FINE INVESTMENT 

LOTS $1G0 and up $10 down $5 per month 

Wooded and Cleared. Watft-pped to Every Lot and 
All Roads Built 

ROCCO BROTHERS 

MATT BROWN Agent at Tract 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



THE best attention and service for the man who car- 
ries a HUWAKD Watch not on account of the 
watch, but beeaiuC he is likely tu be that kind 
of a man. 

The possession of a HOWARD undoubtedly does sujr- 
gesl a man who appreciate.- quality and is Quite able to 
know whether he is Ketting it or not. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Waich. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay For it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attached — from the 
17-jewel i double roller* in a Crescent Extra t>r 
Boss Extra gold -filled case at $4". to thi 
it wel at Sir.o— and the Edward Howard model 
al |3S0 

Admiral Sigsbee has written a liltle I I . 

"The Log of the Howard Watch," giving ihe 
record of his own Howard in the V s Navy. 
You'll enjoy it- Drop us ;t post-card, Dept N. 
and we'll send you ;i copy. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS .A1ND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



Home pnonr S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
>>«6-08 GEARY STREET 

Near Brodrrick 
Telephone W«l 4824 ^\ FRANCISCO 



Phone Merntt 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Avrent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenlh Avenue. Oakland 



THE 

Tripp Remedy Co. 

POSITIVELY Cl'RES 

Blood Poison. Chronic Catarrh. Rheumatism, 

Goitre. Tumorous Growths, Malaria, 

Erysipelas, Scrofula, Lupus, 

TuberbuUr- Glands, 

Joints and all Blood Diseases 

479 TURK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

As a mirth-producer there is no 
more successful play than "Before and 
After," the farce-comedy in whichLeo 
Ditrichstein, his New York aides and 
the Alcazar Company are to appear 
next Monday evening and throughout 
the week, with an extra matinee July 
4th. It was written by Mr. Ditrich- 
stein, and many critics have pro- 
nounced it fully equal in laughter- 
compelling power to his "Are You a 
Mason?" with which San Francisco's 
theatre patrons are more familiar. 
Mr. Ditrichstein as Dr. Page will he 
seen at his artistic best. He pla.sed 
the part an entire season on Broadway 
and another on tour of the Eastern 
cities. Prominent in his support will 
be Madge West as his wife, who takes 
a powdered cocktail; Alice Patek as 
his temporary spouse, whom the pow- 
der afflicts with laughitis; Cora With- 
erspoon as a shoddy adventuress, Ker- 
nan Cripps as the inventor of the 
family-disrupting drug, Burt Wesner 
as the conceited Frenchman and Louis 
Bennison as a gentleman who is fre- 
quently piquea by being mistaken for 
a pugilist, with Roy Clements, Lee 
Millar, Edmond Lowe and other fav- 
orites appropriately bestowed. 

Empress Theatre. 

Ray Thompson's High School Horses, 
for a long time the stellar equestrian 
hit of Ringling Brothers' Circus, will 
be the headline attraction at the Em- 
press Sunday afternoon, in an act in 
which dancing by the steeds is fea- 
tured. A title, euphonious in the ex- 
treme, is "The Arm of the Law" and 
its stirring action corroborates its 
title, for it fairly bristles with the 
various characters of life and the 
trickery of fate, love, ambition, hatred, ; 
revenge — all furnish a composite 
whole for the audience to analyze. 
Creighton Brothers will offer a bit of 
bucolic character painting that, by its 
freshness and remarkable lifelike de- 
lineation, will prove one of the fea- 
tures of the offering. Two Rubes are 
much funnier than one Rube. Another 
duo that will prove popular is Hugh, 
Fay and Elsie Mynn who indulge in 
the latest ragtime songs, a bit of talk- 
ing and some smart gowns. Lohse 
and Sterling, two gymnasts, have 
many thrills for the audience, on the 
horizontal bars. Miss Ella Rachlin, a, 
pianists, programmed as "The Wizard 
on the Ivories." will provide an enter- 
taining number. The Royal Hawaiian 
Dancers and Motion Pictures round 
out the bill. 



Gorham Motor-Propelled Pumping Engines 



SOLD IN CALIFORNIA 




TYPE OF STRAIGHT PUMPING ENGINE 



I Oakland I Straight Pump , 9 San Diego I Combination Hose & Pump 



2 Pasadena 

3 San Diego 

4 Los Angeles 

5 Los Angeles 

6 Los Angeles 

7 San Diego 

8 San Diego 



Combination Hose & Pump 10 Visalia 

I I Bakersfield 



I 2 Los Angeles I 

I 3 Los Angeles ... I Straight Pump 

1 4 Los Angeles I Combination Hose & Pump 

1 5 Sacramento I 



Note. — There are more Gorham Motor Propelled Pumping Engines sold and in service in 
the State of California than all other makes combined 

There is a reason. 15= MERIT TELLS. ASK THE CITY THAT OWNS ONE 

Gorham Fire Apparatus Company 



SEATTLE 
62 & 84 W. Manon Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Steeet 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 South Olive Street 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Sole Distributor for the Pacific Const 54.1 floldrn Onte Ave.. Sun ii.m 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 



P 



►acifi 




IREMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 
One year, in advance $2.00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 

continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
S:m Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March '-'1.1908, at thfl 
Post-office at San Francisco. Cat. under the'Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



Captain Mitchell of engine 41 was favored 
with a seat on the rostrum at Monday night's 
meeting of the Fire Commission. 



"Parson" Boyer of the Pope-Hartford was 
present at that Monday night's apparatus 
meeting hut never "hutted in." What's the 
matter. Parson? Is the American La France 
people getting all the business? 



Commissioner Pfaeffle, with the permission 
of Chairman Hammer, will take a five day 
vacation. Commissioner Brandenstein also in- 
timated to the chair that he would be absents 
couple of days around the Fourlh of July, to 
all of which the president gave his consent. 
How about, a quorum, gentlemen? 

"Gentlemen." said Commissioner Branden- 
Btein, addressing the fire apparatus represen- 
taiives at the close of Monday night's meet- 
ing, "if any of you feel you haven't been 
getting a square ileal from this Board now is 
the time to register your kick." They neither 
affirmed or denied but quietly went out into 
thn night. 

While working at a fire in the Manual 
Training Annex of the Bay School at Sixty- 
third street and San Pablo avenue, Oakland, 
Wednesday, Wm. Reynoldson of engine 8 was 
seriously burned about the head and arms 
under the falling roof. He was dragged out 
from the burning wreckage by his compan- 
ions and was revived with difficulty. It was 
first thought the man had lost his life when 
i he roof was seen to fall on him. 



mending Battalion Chief Wills for his faith- 
ful record of 4fi years in the department, 
took occasion to compliment Chief Engineer 
Murphy, by saying: "Chief Murphy, sitting 
at my left, is a pupil of both Chiefs Scannell 
and Sullivan, and if given the power to 
govern and select his own men, which he 
should have, the Civil Service Commission to 
the conirary, San Francisco would have a fire 
department equaled by none in the United 
States for efficiency." 

The City Attorney, in reference to the J. 
L. Collins case, says: "My understanding is 
that during the entire lime that Mr. Collins 
has been operatorto I he chief engineer of the 
department he has received the salary at- 
tached to his rarilf.. , Tb&fr js, when he was 
lieutenant aja&aojpwell 2 as operator he re- 
ceived the salary of lieutenant, and since be- 
ing promoted to a captaincv and assigned as 
operator, he has received the salary of a 
captain. I also understand that his position 
in his company as captain is taken by a lieu- 
tenant of that company who does not draw a 
captain 'ssalary,hedra wing the salary attached 
to his rank, that is the salarv of a lieutenant." 
The gist of the opinion is that the chief engi- 
neer has the right, according to the charter, 
to employ any man in the department as his 
operator— of any rank — hut that he shall re- 
ceive the salary, attached to his rank. 



A delegation of firemen, it is reported, 
waited on Mayor Rolph last Tuesday morning 
and took up wilh him the non-appointment of 
two lieutenants and two captains in the fire 
1 1 --.i r' ment. Two of t he vacancies have been 
uili led since last November, while the others 
h-jve i waited an appointment for four months. 
In HXii'iiinition Secretan Kennedy of the Fire 
Commission staied I hat ihe appointments had 
been held up awaiting Judge Murasky's deci- 
sion on Lieut. Matlock's suit to compel the 
Civil Service Commission to certify three 
names for each vacancy instead of one as 
heretofore. 

At Fridav's meeting of the Fire Commis- 
sion Commissioner Brandenstein-. in com- 



Wednesday's Pension Board Meeting. 

Battalion Chief Wills' application for re- 
tirement on pension was approved, to tak« 
effect July 1. The members of the Board 
were verv profuse in their felicitations for 
the chief's future welfare, bordering on the 
verge of sentiment. A set of resolutions is 
to be drawn up and spread upon the minutes 
and a copy of same to be sent to the chief's 
wife, commending his 46 years in the de- 
partment. 

Attorney Williams appeared in behalf of 
the relatives of the late Lieutenant Arata, 
whose application has been pending for same. 
The matter was put over to await an opinion 
of City Attorney Long. 

In the petition for pension of Margaret E. 
Girot, widow of Alfred Girot, who, it is 
claimed, died from the effects of cancer of 
the stomach, brought on by a fall received in 
the performance of duty at a fire ten years 
after. The Board favored granting the 
widow's petition, but the matter was put 
over to look up some points in the law in the 
case. 

The petition for a pension of Leo M. 
Coslello, who joined the department July, 
1888, was granted with the understanding 
thrt he sign a power of attorney to his 
daughter who was present, lo draw it in 
order to care for I he minor children, Costello's 
wife having died some time ago, to which he 
agreed. The ptnsion is to go into effect 
July 7. 

There is to be a tie game of baseball played 
between the nines of truck 2 and truck 4 on 
Wednesday at 10 o'clock at the North Beach 
playgrounds. You are invited. 



That Motor Apparatus Meeting. 

A goodly array of motor fire apparatus 
representatives wtre on hand at the special 
session of the Fire Commission last Monday 
night. The purpose of the meeting was to 
•xpend the $23,000 left over from the last 
fiscal year, ending June 30, 1913, for appara- 
tus and other needed supplies. At i he outset, 
Commissioner Brandenstein, in a preliminary 
statement to the representatives, stated that 
owing to the urgent need of fire protection in 
the outlying districts where two new fire sta- 
tions are ready for equipment, it was deemed 
advisable, on the advice of Chief Murphy and 
Superintendent of Engines Bermingham, that 
two steamers with tractors be purchased at 
once, and as the American-La France Com- 
pany were the only people who had submitted 
bids for that type of apparatus, it was de- 
cided that that was the only matter the Board 
would consider at present until the new 
budget became available; but, if any repre- 
sentative desired to talk on the merits of his 
machine the commission would be pleased to 
hear from him. This statement caused some 
comment, the Webb representative asking 
why they were invited at all. 

Mr. Chas. Taber of the Gorham Fire Appa- 
ratus Company was the first and in fact really 
the only one to make any lengthy argument, 
to take advantage of the invitation. He be- 

' gan his argument by submitting several pho- 

j tographs of the Gorham pumping engine, a 
home product, principally manufactured at 

. their Oakland plant, which made such an ex- 
cellent showing in its test at the foot of 
Stockton street, this city, last February. 

| He also submitted letters from fire chiefs of 
Oakland, Los Angeles, San Diego, Pasadena, 

' Visalia and other cities commending the efti- 

i ciency of the Gorham pumping engine in the 
highest terms. At this point Commissioner 

. Brandenstein asked Mr. Taber to specify the 
action of the engine at fires and how many. 
Mr. Taber called upon Mr. Gorham, who was 
present, who gave in detail the number of 
fires and hours the machine worked, all of 
which seemed to make a good impression on 
the members of the Board. 

Mr. Ran some, assistant city engineer, who 
sat with the Board in the capacity of advisory 
counsel, asked many technical questions in 
regard to the working of the pumping engine, 
all of which were answered satisfactorily. The 
only objection Mr. Ransome could find was 
that the Gorham pumping engine was com- 
paratively new in the field and he was in favor 
that other cities do the trying out. After 
some discussion Commissioner Dillon moved 
that a steamer with tractor be awarded to the 
American-La France people which was ap- 
proved by the Board, at a cost of $10,M50. 
Mr. Chapman, representing the American- 



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La France, outside of answering a few minor 
questions put to him by members of the 
Board, had very little to say. 

The secretary was instructed to confer 
with the Finance Committee of the Board of 
Supervisors as to the carrying over of the 
remaining funds to the new budget, which 
will be available after July 1, 1913, when the 
meeting adjourned. 

Argues for the Two-Platoon System. 

Under the above head R. H. Macauley of 
the Vancouver B. C, department, writing to 
a New York fire publication of recent date, 
says: 

"I have come to the conclusion from read 
ing your magazine that yen do not favor the 
platoon system for fire departments. Now, 
if my conclusion is right, why is ii? Have 
you got all of your information concerning it 
from the chiefs, or have you consulted the 
rank and file of the men at the back of the 
chief where it has been put in force? 

"If I am credibly informed, the chiefs are 
satified, though strongly opposed to the change 
at first. Now, I ask you where is the justice 
or reason that a fireman should be on duty 24 
hours (except meal hours) and a policeman 
eight hours, both for the same wages? You 
give us to understand that Chicago firemen 
do not want the change. Well, judging by 
the time they have off, it would not be im- 
proving their condition much; but how about 
the hundreds of other places where the time 
off is from 18 to 24 hours per week besides 
meal hours? 

"A married man under those conditions is 
not long enough at home with his family to 
get acquainted with them. It seems to be 
your aim to benefit and impiove the fire de- 
partments, so why not take under considera- 
tion the platoon system and study it from 
both angles." One of the rank and file. 

Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meetintr of the Fire Commission, held 
June 2.1. we take the following excerpts from 
the Administrative Commil tee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From Henry Casey, truckman truck 6, re 
questing thai he he granted a leave of eh- 
aenee for fifteen days, without pay, corn 
mencing July 2 Granted. 

From W D. Delany, machinist at the cor- 
poration \ nrd, requesting thai In* be granted 
a lurih. i" extension of Ms Lave of absence, 
wirh pay, during the month of June. Granted. 

Prom Richard Allen, lieu tenant engine 15, 
requesting thai be be granted a have of ab- 
sence, withoui pay, for fifteen days, com- 
mem jug J iii> 1(> Granted, 

Frnin Acting Battalion Chief Bllenberger, 

BUhrnil i u if a report of an mcimui lo th) h"H« 
Wagon oi engine 17, wherebv Captain Ward 
and Substitute A. Penebsky wen* seriously 
injured while responding to an alarm oi fire 
on i be 16th inst. Piled. 

In connection with the above your com 
mil lee would also recommend that a resolu- 
tion be adopted allowing said Substitute 
Penebsky salary during disability from said 



accident for a period of thirty days from the 
date of said accident. 

From A. J. Conn iff, hoseman engine 39, re- 
questing that he be allowed a leave of absence 
for fifteen days, without pay, commencing 
July 15. Granted. 

From the City Attorney, submitting an 
opinion in the matter of the installation of 
fire alarm bells in the residences of members 
of the Underwriters' Fire Patrol Filed. 

From D. R. SeweH, acting battalion chief, 
submitting a complaint against Geo. Race- 
horn, truckman truck \'2, for a violation of 
the rule forbidding members off duty on sick 
leave from leaving their residence after eight 
o'clock p. m. After an investigation of this 
matter your committee find that Racehorn 
violated said rule and we accordingly. recom- 
mend that he be not allowed salary for the 
four davs he was absent from duty. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the Civil Service Commission be re- 
quested to certify eligihles from the civil 
'service lists for appointment to the following 
positions in this department : Two captains, 
two lieutenants, one hoseman and one truck- 
man. Approved. 

From the International Association of Fire 
Engineers, inviting this department to send a 
representative to attend its next annual con- 
vention at New York in September. Referred 
to the Board for consideration. 

From the Fourth of July Celebration Com 
mittee, requesting that this department par- 
ticipate in the parade on that day with men 
and apparatus. Referred to the chief engi- 
neer to reply as to the inadvisabtlity of com- 
plying with this request and the reasons 
therefor. 

From Battalion Chief Cook, submitting a 
complaint against A. Landthom, hoseman fire- 
boat 1, for using ungentlemanly language to 
Captain Danahy of said company on the 16th 
inst. Landthom appeared before the Board 
and admitted using improper language to 
Captain Danahy. This being his first offense 
your committee advised him it had no desire 
to recommend a punishment for ibis offense, 
but that it believed that he would be bene- 
fitted in his deportment by voluntarily apply- 
ing for a transfer into an engine company, to 
which be signified his willingness. 

From Chief Boden, submitting a complaint 
against A. J. Hennessy, hoseman engine <;. 
tot failing to respond loan alarm of Cue with 
bis company on the 20th inst. On the State- 
ment uf Captain Mailman that Hennessy had 
been working bard that day at company quar- 
ters and failed to awake, your commit h e re- 
commend that the complaint he dismissed. 

From W. E. Gallatin, Jr., captain engine 3, 

requesting that In- be granted a leave of ab- 
sence wiili permission in leave the cit^ For 
thirty days, on account ol disability, resulting 

hom an injury received in the disch;n 
duty. Granted. 

From Charles A. Gavigan, tendering his 
resignation as blacksmith helper at tb. cor 
poral ion yard. Accepted, to take I ffecl linn 
date. 

Your Committee recommend that the fid- 



lowing resolution be adopted: 

Resolved, That the Secretary of this Board 
and he is hereby directed to comply with the 
request of the Civil Service Commission by 
furnishing monthly reports of all probationary 
members of thisdepartment upon such blanks 
as may be furnished by that department for 
that purpose. 

Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

Matter of hearing of complaint against W. 
H. Lynch, hoseman engine 10, for failing to 
report to his superior officer the mutilating 
of the company journal on the 3rd inst. Put 
over one week. 

Consideration of bids for one or more steam 
fire engines with gasoline motor tractors at- 
tached. Put over. 

Consideration of bids for furnisHng one or 
more gasoline motor tractors. Put over. 

From the City Attorney, submitting an 
opinion in the case of J. L. Collins, captain 
engine 29, detailed as operator to the chief 
engineer. Copy to be sent to Civil Service 
Commission. 

From the Civil Service Commission, certi- 
fying Jas. Muldoon, No. 92 of the eligible 
list, for appointment as truckman in the de- 
partment. Appointed. 

From the Civil ServiceCommission, certify- 
ing the following for temporary employment 
in this department as substitute firemen: 
Frank P. Gibson, No. 101; Joseph Walsh, No. 
104; Oscar J. Kaufer, No. 105; Win. Leich- 
senring. No. 107; John J. Sutter, No. 109; 
J. P. Collins, No. 111. Appointed. 

From W Bullier, hoseman engine 19, re- 
questing a leave of absence for 30 days, with 
pay, beginning June 24, with permission to 
leave the city, on account of sickness. 
Granted. 

Motion that power be given to the chief lo 
install new chemical company 18 at Twelfth 
avenue and Geary street. Approved. 

There is to be concerted action taken to 
bring the International Association of Fire 
Engineers to meet here in 1915. If the chief 
engineer goes to New York to attend t be 
coming convention of that body, he will be 

requested to do everything possible to name 

San Francisco as the meeting place in 1915. 

The chief was going to a lire with Jerry 
Collins ai the wheel. At Fifth and Market 
a visitor from the country heard a honk ur <1. r 
bis left ear as be was looking toward the 
ferry building; be jumped backwards eight 
feei, then ran for the traffic policeman ii ihe 
center of the Btreet. "Iln," be Bnouit-d, 
"did you Bee that? I wanl 1 wai t '"Do 

you wanl b w« rr mi for his arn "War- 

rant, nothing; what good would a warrant 
do? I wait i ex i radii ion ps pi ■ 



[cUphoM DousUu 1 255 

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Special attention given to Weddiny and Funeral Orders. 

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Marine View Terrace 

(THE PIEDMONT OF RICHMOND) 
DON'T 

let this opportunity pass by. This is absolutely 
your last chance to get close in property at such 
prices and terms. 

Only seven minutes walk from the 
City Hall. Ashland Avenue will reach 
Marine View Terrace through tr.emur.icir.al 
tunnel and continue on throus h the er.t re length 
of the property to the new terry from \\ hich boats 
will run regularly to and Irom San Frar Cisco. 

Bonds have been sold and the money is 

now in the hands of the City 1 ie?surer (or the 
immediate construction of these m.| roverrenls 
and values will double and treble in a very 
short time. 

Oon't delay— buy now instead of 
wishing you had later on. 

For maps or further information, see or write 

WENHAM & PAUL 

1444 San Pablo Ave., Oakland. California 








=£XL 




VOL. X.-NO. 33 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 5, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Are Firemen Easy to Replace? 



' 



The head of a fire department in 
New Mexico is credited with the state- 
ment that he had no difficulty in re- 
placing the firemen who left because 
of unsatisfactory conditions. The dis- 
contented men left at night, and the 
next morning, according to the re- 
ports, the chief had replaced them by 
men quite as capable of fighting fires. 

This means one of two things, says 
an exchange, either the force in ques- 
tion was practically worthless before 
the men resigned, or else the chief 
was misquoted — and we have not seen 
any denials coming from him. A 
man may get religion overnight, 
but it takes the best material at least 
five years to become truly competent, 
efficient, all-round fighters of fire, 
equal to whatever emergency may 
arise. 

The Memphis, Tenn., Commercial 
Appeal says that the artistic taste of 
"Spike McFadden, chief of the Mem- 
phis Fire Department, does not have 
much play in the ordinary handling' of 
his department. Also in the painting 
of l he apparatus the brilliant red 
which has indicated the belongings of 
fire departments from time immemo- 
rial is about the only color officially 
permitted. But in i he decoral ion of 
Ihe new fire tower, built to provide 
for the (xi reins of ih< men climbing, 
jumping and other athletic stunts, the 
chief has permit Ifd himself the luxury 
of indulging in other colors. The 
tower itself is painted a delicate fawn 
color, trimmed in a darker shade of 
tan, the upper portions beautifully 
embellished with fancy painting, and 



the tower is surrounded by a brilliant 
gilted dome. 



During a fire in Hancock's planing 
mills, Toronto, Out., Deputy Chief 
Russell and five of his men became 
literally intoxicated, not on strong 
drink, but on the fumes sent out by 
the burning shingles. Itwrs a case 
of "wood-alcoholism," and the symp- 
toms were almost identical with those 
shown by men who had been drinking 
heavily. The firemen lost control of 
their legs and suffered severely from 
"heads." Some of them also were 
rendered violently sick. An monia is 
the restorative to be used under such 
conditions. It can be carried conven- 
iently in tablet form. 

The San Mateo Times says a fire at 
Lomita Park, Tuesday, June 24. gained 
such headway that the departments 
of both San Mateo and Hillsborough, 
under Chiefs Bartleit and Grant, re- 
sponded to an appeal for aid. While 
they were not able, for lack of water 
to accomplish much, the occasion af- 
forded an excellent opportunity for 
testing the speed of the two chemical 
engines and they covered the distance 
over the state highwaj at a pace never 
seen I here before. Hoi ois were about 
equally dividid and both machines 
stood the test. will. Two houses were 
destroyed i.ia ,i ■■ ; h 

Philadelphia firemen are being neido 

to toe the mark by Director Porter, 

A I each lire station eaeh man is called 
mi to stand in line at 8 o'clock in the 
morning with his blouse buttoned up 

In the neck, his trousers pressed and 
his slmes shined. If any lire Bhould 
break oul during this fifteen minutes' 



inspection the men must not wait to 
change their good clothes, and both in 
going from and coming to the fire 
house at meal times they must wear 
their uniform coats buttoned up. 

Arson Trust Members Convicted. 

A Chicago special dispatch, dated 
June 29, speaking of the conviction of 
three arson trust members, says: 

Edward and Paul Covitz, former 
woolen merchants, and Joseph Clarke, 
public fire insurance adjuster, were 
found guilty of arson by a jury which 
returned a verdict in the Criminal 
Court. 

The agreement of the jury came as 
a surprise. Both counsel for the state 
and defense had expected a disagree- 
ment, because the jurors had deliber- 
ated twenty hours and twenty-five 
minutes when the verdict was reached. 
Two jurors, it was said, held out from 
the beginning to acquit Clarke. 

The convicted men were the first of 
forty-six alleged members of the "ar- 
son trust." recently indicted, to be 
tried. They were convicted in connec- 
tion with an incendiary fire at Covitz 
Brothers' place of business on the 
night of November - r >. 1912. 

John Daniels, a "firebug." was the 
star witness for the prosecution. He 
testified thai Clarke had written him 
in come to Chicago from New York, 

and that he had he,n given $700 bj 
the adjuster to applj the torch. 

Clarence S. Harrow was chic! coun- 
sel for the defense. 

Charlie, Texas, a "wooden town." 
with no protection and no il 
was wiped out by B lire that started 
I in a grocery store. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Saving in Motor Apparatus. 



Petaluma. 



Chief A. J. Aungst of East Liver- 1 At the last regular meeting of the 
pool, Ohio, speaking of the saving of j Petaluma Board of Fire Commission- 
motor fire apparatus says: !ers, held Thursday, June 26, Chief 

"A 75-foot motor quick-raising lad- j Adams' annual report was read. The 
der truck, operated by spring, electric report recommends many improve 



or hand power, will enable us to fight 
fires or save life in our highest build- 
ings. The one we have now is too 



ments, among them the reorganization 
of the volunteer fire department. 
The commissioners voted to have 



short to reach our buildings. A com- the fire apparatus take part in the 
bination chemical and hose wagon, ! Fourth of July parade. 



one each for the East End, West End 
and Northside stations, using the 
bodies and equipment of the trucks 
we now have, will save considerable 
for the city. Some of our citizens may 
not think it advisable to motorize our 
entire department at once. If I had 



The salary of Driver Tony Peters of 
the fire engine was fixed at $90 per 
month, and Floyed Drake's monthly 
salary was placed at $85. 

Gorham Fire Apparatus Co. on the Job. 

The city of Pendleton, Oregon, has 
never had experience with motors I awarded a contract to the Gorham Fire 
would not advise it either, but with j Apparatus Company for one Seagrave 
my experience and the careful investi- : combination hose and chemical engine, 
gation on the part of the city officials „,„,,, 
heretofore mentioned, it was decided Seattle, Wash, has awarded a con- 
to do so for several reasons. First. i tract t0 th * Gorha ™ Flre Apparatus 
we will save a few thousand dollars ' Company for one Seagrave tractor- 
by buying several pieces at the same , drawn 75 ' foot aenal trucl< and two 
time. By securing machines all of one > four-wheel motor 50-foot city servtce 

make, it will be much easier to teach j hook and ladder trucks - 
the men. Broke in on one machine/ Reports from Springfield, thelllinois 
he will be able to run any of them, state capitol, say that the firemen's 
Any parts, such as tires, may be car- two-platoon bill has been passed to 
ried in small quantities, as one will fit the third reading in the senate in an 
the other." amended form. The amendments 

I provide that the bill shall apply to all 

Joseph Van Order, a fireman who cities and shal | not become operative 
was dismissed from the Troy, N. Y.. | unti] it is passed at a referendum vote 
Fire Department, was reinstated on in each city affected. It is said to he 
appeal to the courts, with back pay ,, ikelv th:lt the bil j mav now pass lhe 
allowed. It appears that, as the law ; senate but that it wi ,j not be enacted 
stands, he can recover that hack pay j nt0 ] aw t hj s session 
only by a civil suit against the man 

who took his place, as the city need j At New York - June 30 - thp hodies 
not pay back salaries to employes >f seven persons, lodgers in a small 
wrongfully dismissed who are veter- | hotel, known as "Till's Hotel," at C6 
ans of the civil war. The city paid Greenwich street, were taken from 
the court costs. the top floor following a fire in the 

building Monday nipht. One of the 

In order to become members of the bodies is that of a woman and another 
fire department of Waukegan. 111.. f a three-year-old child. None has 
the candidates for admission were been identified. A dozen injured were 
compelled to pass five lests as part of taken to hospitals. 
the physical examination as follows 



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To "chinn themselves'' three times on 
a bar; to cbmbarope; to carry a man 
(weight and height not stated) on 
their shoulders: to clear three feet in 
a high jump; to run around the track 
at the high school gymnasium in a 
specified time. 



The Tuscola, III., department ha^ 
had to be reorganized by Chief Bassett. 
as two-thirds of the force resigned for 
personal reasons. To have to fight a 
fire with two-thirds of the men fresh- 
horns is a risky thing. 

The Pacific Fireman $2.00 a year. 



THE 

Dr. John Tripp Remedy Company 

POSITIVELY CURES 

Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh. Rheumatism, 

Goitre, Tumorous Growths, Malaria, 

Erysipelas, Scrofula, Lupus. 

Tuberbular-Glands, 

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479 TURK STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



P A C 1 K 1 C FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Nothing- funnier was ever written 
for the stage than Are "You a Mason?" 
which is to be the Alcazar's offering 
next Monday night and throughout 
the week. Although it was adapted 
from the German, and incidentally es- 
tablished Leo Ditrichstein's fame as a 
shrewd selector of foreign material to 
suit this country's less liberal taste, it 
produces more American laughs than 
any purely-native humorous play, be- 
cause its characters and its wit are 
American and its plot is fairly jammed 
with ludicrous situations. This will 
ba the Alcazar's eleventh revival of 
"Are You a Mason?" and its presen- 
tation has invariably been a profitable 
venture. It packed the first Alcazar 
to the doors the night before that 
memorable morning of April 18. 1906. 
and it did the same thing twice in the 
Sutter-street house. That it will be 
witnessed by crowded audiences is a 
foregone conclusion, for since it was 
last staged here the people of San 
Francisco have formed intimate ac- 
quaintance with its author'sability as 
a farceur and are eager to again wit- 
ness the work that established his 
success on this side of the Atlantic. 

Empress Theatre. 

In the approaching performance of 
"The Son of Solomon," as presented 
by Mr. Hugh Herbert and a capable 
company, also include Miss Margot 
Williams and Mr. Thomas Evert. 
This delightful playlet from the pen 
of Aaron Hoffman, will be the head- 
line attraction at the Empress Sunday 
afternoon. Several of the most per- 
fectly formed women obtainable were 
secured for the life pictures seen in 
"The Models De Luxe" the added 
fe u ure. In flesh-colored tights, these 
wo nen will reproduce, by living- pic- 
tires, some of the famous paintings 
tuat now adorn the walls of the most 
famous American and foreign galle- 
ries. Mae D.lly and Charles Mack, 
violmisteand guitar players, will give 
a charming musical treat of classic 
and popular melodies. Wilton and 
Merrick are comedy gymnasts whoex- 
ci' ■ in srriment With their droll antics 
on the trampoline and horizontal bars. 
S> nil dug different in the dancing 

1 will be I. resented by Elliott and 

West. Gilmoreand La Tour, both pos- 
sessing good voices, will offer a series 
of character irmersonations. Mrs. 
Frank Parnum, a coloratura soprano, 
assisted by Harry Simpson al the piano, 
will render a pleasing repertoire of 
ballads. 



Gorham Motor-Propelled Pumping Engines 



SOLD IN CALIFORNIA 




TYPE OF STRAIGHT PUMPING ENGINE 



1 Oakland . 

2 Pasadena 

3 San Diego 

4 Los Angeles 

5 Los Angeles 

6 Los Angeles 

7 San Diego 

8 San Diego 



Straigh 



Combination Hose & Pump 



Pump 



9 San Diego I Combination Hose & Pump 
10 Visalia . 1 " " " " 

I 1 Bakersfield I " 

1 2 Los Angeles I 

I 3 Los Angeles ... 1 Straight Pump 

1 4 Los Angeles I Combination Hose & Pump 

1 5 Sacramento I 

Note. — There are more Gorham Motor Propelled Pumping Engines sold and in service in 
the State o( California than all other makes combined 

There is a reason. t$" MERIT TELLS. ASK THE CITY THAT OWNS ONE 

Gorham Fire Apparatus Company 



SEATTLE 
82 & 84 W. Marion Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Steeet 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 South Olive Street 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to Jfer/j 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 





good oil, say 



PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD !. BILL 

Sole Distributor (or the Pacific Const M3 Ooldefl Ontc Ave.. Pan Fraodaco 



PACIFIC KIKUMAN 



P 



»AGIFI 




IREMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BV 

JAS. K. MACK ... Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

FT. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance . $2.00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially li»nre and 

continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867". 

Entered as second-class matter March 21, I90s,-al I he 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.r under the Aft of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



Asst. Chief John R. Maxwell, as a tax- 
payer, through his attorneys, again seeks to 
enjoin the Civil Service Commission from 
holding an examination of battalion chiefs 
July 23 to 25, to fill the positions of first and 
second assistant chiefs. The chief claims the 
charter does not authorize the Civil Service 
Commission to hold such an examination. 

Notwithstanding that City Attorney Long 
last week rendered an opinion in the Jerry 
Collins case, it seems the Civil Service Com- 
mission will have none of it, and now refuses 
to attach its signatures to Jerry's salary 
warrant. It's up to Jerry to mandamus the 
City Auditor or convince some SuperiorCourt 
judge that he's entitled to pull down a cap- 
tain's salary while acting as Chief Murphy's 
operator. 

Commissioner Brandenstein at Wednesday's 
meeting, in putting his motion that the reso- 
lution formerly adopted by the Board com- 
plying with the request of the Civil Service 
Commission in furnishing monthly reports of 
all probationary members be recinded, took 
occasion in no uncertain terms to denounce 
the action of the Civil Service Commission 
for its action in the opinion of City Attorney 
Long that Captain Collins was entitled to the 
salary attached to his rank while acting as 
operator to Chief Murphy. 

City Attorney Long this week, in an opinion 
given to the Fire Pension Board passed fav- 
orably on the points raised in regard to the 
application of the parents of the late Lieut. 
Arata for pension. The opinion recites that 
Arata was seriously injured at a fire in Octo- 
ber, 1905, and confined in a hospital for-sev- 
eral months. He never fully recovered and 
finally he became insane as a result of his in- 
juries. The City Attorney says that undei 
Mich circumstances a pension can be granted. 
Arata was the sole support of his parents and 
he left neither wife nor child. 



Owing to the strenuous fight put up to the 
Board of Supervisors last Monday by Presi- 
dent Hammer of the Fire Commission and the 
President of the Panama Exposition and Fire 
Chief Murphy, the Supervisors refused to 
adopt the resolution recommended by the 



Finance Committee directing the Fire Com- 
missioners to lay off one of the two fireboats 
in order to make the retrenchment, in expenses 
declared to be necessary because of Governor 
Johnson's failure to sign the billl appropriating 
$50,000 as the State's share of the expense of 
maintaining the two boats. The vote was 
eleven to (our against the resolution. 

A clipping from a Portland, Me., paper of 
recent dale was handed to us hy Fire Chief 
Murphy in which Deputy Chief Wm. H. Steele 
of the Portland Fire Department is dead, and 
Captain W. G Parker and Giles Redmond are 
in a serious condition as the result of inhaling 
fumes of nitric acid from a broken oar hoy in 
the nsvfement of a drug store. The chief in- 
formed us that :in ordinance is being framed, 
which he savs will be passed next Tuesday 
guarding against the reckless storing of this 
dangerous acid hereafter in San Francisco. 

In a tire in the Girard Piano Company, 517 
Fourteenth street, Oakland. Tuesday, four- 
teen firemen, it is reported, 'were Overcome 
by smoke in the basempnt oft he building. It 
was more I han two hours before ihe fire was 
under control. The loss is said not to exceed 
$5000. Asst. Chief Sam Short was so over- 
come by smoke that he had to he dragged out 
of the basement, but as soon as he could 
stand on his feet, it is said, he insisted on 
going back to work. Crossed wires is sup- 
posed to have caused the blaze. The men 
have all recovered. 

Election of Directors. 

The followineis the official ballot for Direc- 
tors of the Widows' and Orphans' Aid Asso- 
ciation of the San Francisco Fire Department; 
the nine candidates receiving the larerest 
number of votes were declared elected for 
the ensuing year: 

John Bowlan, captain engine 45 185 

W.J. Bannon, captain truck 9 221 

John Cahill, driver engine 26 243 

Joseph Capelli, captain chemical 4 71 

Charles Claveau, operator 154 

J. J. Con I on, battalion chief 333 

D. R. Conniff, Fire Commissioners' office 444 

John Gavin, lieutenant engine 31 280 

William Gill, captain engine 25 293 

Henry F. Horn, retired battalion chief 300 

Thomas Kelly, engineer engine 44 96 

John Maiheson, captain engine 27.. 226 

Thomas J. Murphy, battalion chief 358 

J. J. Murray, lieutenant engine 14 114 

Shanahan, J. L., hoseman engine 13 329 

The matter of amending Article II. Section 
1 of the Constitution and By-Laws was de- 
feated, it failing to receive the necessary two- 
third vote of the members. 

The Fire Commission, at last Friday's 
meeting, recommendtd ihe following resolu- 
tion be adopted: Resolved, That the Secre- 
tary of this Board be and he is hereby directed 
to comply with the request of theCivilService 
Commission in furnishing monthly reports of 
all probationary members of this department 
upon such blanksasmay be furnished by that 
department for that purpose. Owing to the 
action of the Civil Service Commission in 



seeking to nullify City Attorney Long's 
opinion in Jerry Collins' case. Commissioner 
Brandenstein, at Wednesday 's meeting of the 
Fire Board, moved that the above resolu'ion 
be recinded, Commissioners Dillon and Pfa« ffle 
voting "no" and Hammer and Brandenstein 
voting "yes." 

It was reported last week that the Fire 
Commissioners were willing to confer with 
the Civil Service Commission and the Mayor 
on the question of whether one or three 
names should be certified from the Civil Ser- 
vice eligible list io the Fire Commission when 
it is requested to make an appointment. 
Owing to Judef Murasky having decided that 
the Fire Commission is entitled under the 
charier to have three names certified so ihat 
it may have I he privilege of making a choice, 
the Civil Service Commission is still disposed 
to certify only one name. The Mayor has all 
along been in thorough accord in this matter 
with the Civil Service Commission, believing 
that the man at the top of the list is entiiled 
to the appointment. 

Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
July 2, we take the following excerpts from 
the Administrative Committee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the application of Frederick Von Soos'en 
for a transfer from truckman truck 5 to hose- 
man engine \0 be granted. So ordered. 

From the chief engineer, submitting a re- 
port of the expenditures made during the 
past fiscal year from the appropriation for 
new buildings and sites. Filed. 

From the chief engineer, submitting month- 
ly report of the condition of the men, appara- 
tus, etc., of thedepartment in general. Filed. 

From the Upper Sunsut Improvement Cluh, 
thanking the Board for according that dis- 
trict better fire protection by the establish- 
ing of chemical company 12 there. Filed. 

From Dennis McAuliff, boseman engine 36, 
requesting that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for thirty days, with, pay, with per- 
mission to leave the city, on account of sick- 
ness. Granted. 

From the family of the late Captain Drury 
of engine 35, thanking the Board for the reso- 
lutions of condolence adoptea in behalf ol his 
death. Filed. 

From F. H. Hill, offering to trade a lot on 
Fifth avenue in the Sunset District, for the 
fire department lot on Ninth avenue in ihe 
Richmond District. Fiied and ihe secreiaiy 
directed to reply that this Board lias no power 
to enter into such a negotiation. 

From Battalion Chief Murphy, submitting 
a complaint against Thos. McCarthy, hose- 






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TAILORS FOR JVlErS 

1IOS MARKET ST. 

ODD FELLOWS BUILDING 
Phont Mnltel 1503 

UNIFORMS OUR SPECIALTY UNION LABEL USED 



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man engine 10, for failing to report to the 
quarters of his company for duty at the ex- 
piration of a leave of absence on June 26. 
After an investigation of this matter your 
committee find that the communication of 
Battalion Chief Murphy does not constitute 
any cause for a complaint and accordingly re- 
commend that the same be placed on file. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, sub- 
mitting a report of employes of the corpora- 
tion yard absent from duty during the month 
of June. Filed. 

From the Board of Public Works, advising 
that the Board of Supervisors have been re- 
quested to set aside the sum of $813 for the 
purpose of constructing the pavement in 
front of the fire house on Twelfth avenue 
between Geary and Anza streets. Filed. 

Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

Matter of hearing complaint against Win. 
H. Lynch, hoseman engine 10, for failing to 
report to his superior officer ihe mutilating of 
the company journal on the 3rd inst. Four 
days suspension from original date. 

Consideration of bids for inner and outer 
sectional tube units for fire engine boilers. 
Put over. Referred to Commissioner Dillon 
to report. 

Consideration of bids for one or more steam 
fire engines wiih gasoline motor tractors 
attached. Put over to call of chair. 

Consideration of bids for furnishing one or 
more gasoline motor tractors. Put over to 
call of chair. 

From the Civil Service Commission, au- 
thorizing temporary appointments in the de- 
partment for the month of .July. Approved. 

From the Secretary of the Fourth of July 
Committee, asking the participation of a fire 
on an exhibition to be held on that date. 
Request denied. 

From First Asst. Chief J. R. Maxwell, re- 
porting members who have been on sick leave 
for 90 days and over. Filed. 

The plans of ihe new engine house, to be 
known as engine 48, at Twenty-second and 
Wisconsin streets, were submitted by Chief 
M.irphy and approved. 

Portland (Or) Fire News. 

I special Correspondence. 1 
The new American-La France truck has 
arrived. It has an 85-foot aerial and full 

equipment of ladders, etc. It is of the gaso- 
line electric type, 4 wheel drive and 4 wheel 
steer. When accepted, it will be put in service 
as i ruck 1 in the business district, to take the 

p] ice of Lhe first class Hayes Hi) tool aerial, 

which was demolished in an accident some 
time Hgo. The new truck has 276 feet of lad- 
Hers and coal $12,600. 

Engine company 30 was put in service Mon- 
day the 23rd at 8:40 p. m. Capt. J. Williams 
is in charge, having been transferred from 
engine 10. The hoys have u very neat and 
comfortable home. The building was de 
Bigued by Battalion Chief Holden and cos) 
$H,0U0. A horse drawn hose wagon will be 
biied. 



The Water Board has ordered the City 
Auditor to advertise for bids for 2800 tons of 
8-inch and 300 tons of 6-inch iron water mains 
and 125 tons of special castings for immediate 
use. Contracts for these supplies will be let 
by Commissioner Daly after July 1st. 

Two years, almost to a day since Chief 
Campbell met his death in the fearless dis- 
| charge of his duty, a fund known as the David 
I Campbell Memorial and Medal Fund was in- 
corporated to perpetuate the memory of the 
beloved fire chief and to reward members of 
the fire department who risk their lives to 
1 save fellow men. The association plans to 
award handsome gold medals and is compos- 
ed of Mr C. G L«»ng, John F. Carrol, W. S. 
Pangle, Commissioner C. C. Bigelow and Asst, 
Chief M. Landenkloss. There is $2,212.75 in 
the fund to start with. 

At a special meeting of the Executive Board 
of the City Council a contract was awarded to 
the American La France Fire Engine Com- 
pany for one of its latest t\ pe No. 12 auto 
combination pumping engine and hose car. 
Bids were received from the Robinson, Nott, 
Seagrave and American-La France Compa- 
nies and ranged from $7,900 to $10,700, the 
American-La France bid being $9,000. The 
Nott Company's bid was $7,900, and they 
guaranteed their machine to equal if not sur- 
pass the American-La France. The new pum- 
per is to be installed at engine 17, in the dis- 
trict where the majoritv of the hospitals and 
fine apartment houses and residences are 
located. 

Contracts for 10,000 feet of 2£ inch and 
1,600 feet of IJ-inchhose were let by the City 
Executive Board as follows: 3,000 feet of 24- 
inch Paragon at $1.10 per foot; 1,000 feet of 
2J inch Crackerjack at 85 cents per foot; 800 
feet of lj-inch Crackerjack at 48 cents per 
foot; 3,000 feet of 2£-inch Keystone at $1.10 
per foot; 1,000 feet of 24-inch Victor at 80 
cents per foot; 1,000 feet of 2£ inch Chwader 
at 83 cents per foot; 1.000 2$ inch Columbia 
at 85 cents per foot; 800 feet of 1J inch Res- 
cue at 48 cents per foot. 

Seaside, Oregon, has laid a high pressure 
salt water service main and installed pumps; 
also divided the city into sect ions and created 
firelimitsand made building laws which will 
go a long way toward preventing another 
conflagration such as was experienced there 
some time ago. 

The new (muses being bnilt fur the depart- 
ment are progressing raj idly. Truck 3's 
basement is finished; engine 4 and truck 2's 
new home is up and the interior work will 
soon be finished; engine 21, "Inch will he lo- 
cated in the new jail building, expect to be in 
their new quarters in October. 

The Lumbermen's Association has fur- 
nished ever > child in ihe Portland schools 
with a square piece <>i paper which, when 
folded as per directions, forms a drinking 
cup. Each fold as it is made changes the 
picture of ;i careless camper leaving a bum 

ing camp lire in a peaceful valley to a terri- 
ble foresl tire. Some v. r\ interesting read- 
ing and lire prevention instructions are also 
printed on it. 



The new fireboat David Campbell has heen 
accepted and put in service at the foot of 
East Washington street, in the place of the 
George Williams, which will be placed in the 
dry dock and have her machinery overhauled 
and a new huh. 

Hoseman C. V. Dolphy has been reinstated 
in the department. Dolphy was dismissed 
recently for having participated in a brawl 
with his comrades and used disrespectful lan- 
guage to a superior officer. 

Hoseman Earl Chase was reinstated to duty 
at the meeting of the Board. Chase absented 
himself from quarters without permission. 
He was stationed at the supply house as sup- 
ply wagon driver. 

The contract for engine 2's new house has 
been awarded to C. C. Meyer. The new 
house will be located at Third and Glisan 
strrets and will cost $11,678. Work will be 
commenced immediately. 

The Fire Committee of the Executive Board 
granted every member of the Firemen's Band 
his annual vacation to take effect about Au- 
gust 26th t so the boys can attend the conven- 
tion of fire chiefs in New York from Sept. 1st 
to 5th. The boys are going to hold a picnic 
and excursion July 13th at Estecada to help 
raise funds for the trip. 

Persons doing business with Schmalz & Son, 
brokers, are hereby notified that said firm 
has moved to 73 Third street, where they 
have large and commodious quarters. You 
are invited to visit their new store.— Adrt. 



We had the pleasure of a social chat with 
Captain Newell of engine 13 on hisday off last 
week. As an official of this department Cap- 
tain Newell is doing his share in endeavoring 
to bring the department to a high state of 
efficiency. 

Captain Ward and Substitute A. Penebsky, 

who met with serious injuries by the over- 
turning of engine 17's hose wagon on Fifth 
street last week, are both out of the hospital. 
They are getting along nicely with their arms 
in slings. In a brief talk with Captain Ward 
he informed us it would be from four to six 
weeks he thought before they would be able 
to report for duty. 

Driver John Woodman of engine 5, it is re- 
ported, had a narrow escape from death this 
week. While he was pulling out of quarters 
in responding to an alarm, one of the harness 
supports hanging from the ceiling caught in 
his coal and held him suspended by the neck. 
Woodman wriggled and dropped to ihe gToui d 
before hia collar had become too tight. Be 
received numerous abrasions and contusions 
about the head, for which he was trealec at 
the Harbor BmerfFi I CJ Hospital. 



Telephone l>ou«U. 1253 

U. J. BORCK, rHE tailor 

MAKI 3 A SPECIALTY OF 

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ALSO FINE CIVILIAN stirs 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



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OF CALIFORNIA 
151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



n 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cur. Zlnd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



BROWN & KENNEDY LOTS $150 

FLORAL 



$150 LOTS 



Fresh cut flowers and boqueta always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attt nti&n given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs, 

Garth ni ng, Etc 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Rkach NiiKSEiHEs. take Castro street car to 23rd. 01 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 2Jth streets. 





1 1 2 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 


717 K SlfMl 

Sacramento 


EAGLESON 


& CO. 


Importer, and Manufacturer* 


MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 


AND SHIRTS 


Navy Flannel Regulation 


Fire Shirts 


1118 MARKET ST., opp 


Seventh 


PI.™,, \la-lo-, 5417 ! 


MM 1 R4NCISCO 


Phone Douglas 4716 


Home C 2458 



A 
R 

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™°"e», Markel 5725 

FUNERAL WORK A SPECIALTY 

UIWICST /'KICKS 

3091 SIXTEENTH STREET 

NEAR VALENCIA 
UNION STORE SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Dou„l« 287 1 Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WAkRAM BROKERS 



EASY TERMS 



1IN- 



73 THIWO STREET 
COR COMMEKCIAI SAN FRANCISCO 



LAMANETBROS 

HATS. I'NDKRWEAK. r.TC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout SuUs Gen.s' Furnishine, Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



\A/M. F. EIG.AN 

H. R. C V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D. 

T15S UOl-DEN GATE AYE. 

IVWph >a Park I It and 118 San Francisco. CaL 



Marine View Terrace 

(THE PIEDMONT OF RICHMOND) 
DON'T 

let this opportunity pass by. This is absolutely 
your last chance to get close in propel ty at such 
prices and terms. 

Only seven minutes walk from the 
City Hall. Ashland Avenue will reach 
Marine View Terrace thrcujh lhemur.it i| a) 
tunnel and continue en thn uj>h the ent re Itnsth 
ol the property to the new feny (rem w hich beats 
will run regularly to and (rom San Francisco. 

Bonds have been sold and the mom y is 
now in the hands of the City Treasurer (cr the 
immediate ronstructien o( these irr.rroven enls 
and values will double and treble in a \eiy 
short time. 

Don't delay buy now instead of 
wishing you had later on. 

For maps or further information, see or write 

WENHAM & PAUL 

1444 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, California 





m 



'ACIFI 




IREMAN 




VOL. X.-NO. 34 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JULY 12, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Around the Bay Cities. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

The following are on the eligible list 
for appointment as firemen in the 
Oakland Fire Department: F. C. Kis- 
pert, G. H. D. Doane, H. M. Fuller, 
J. H. Herrick, L. W. Parks. E. Gay- 
nor, F. H. Walden, H. T. Jones, L. 
W. Eddy, W. Shea, P. J. Sullivan, J. 
L. Barry, E. C. Alber, T. Hackett, F. 
Ward, J. D. Keane, C. M. Lambert, 
Jr., S. N. Norman; eligible for ap- 
pointment as stoker, Jas. M. Nairn. 

All boarding, lodging and sorority 
houses in Berkeley must have ade- 
quate fire escapes to accommodate all 
students in the buildings. Many 
buildings used for these purposes 
have no fire escapes at present. All 
must be fully equipped by the open- 
ing of the University for the fall 
term. 

The fire that destroyed the manual 
training annex to the Bay School is 
thought to have started from sponta- 
neous combustion. The fire is be- 
lieved to have started in the paint 
room where a quantity of oils and 
varnish and paint was stored. The 
loss is estimated at $1500, partly cov- 
ered by insurance. 

Grass fires have been keeping the 
departments of the East Bay cities on 
the run during the hot spell, and all 
the mem hers are thankful for a "sane 
Fourth. " 

Three figures have been submitted 
to the Alameda City Council for the 
repair of the auto pumping engine 
that was wrecked recently. This en- 
gine was the first piece of automobile 
apparatus to be used on the Pacific 
Cast. It was purchased in 1908 and 



has been in active service ever since. 
Engineer Wagner, who was at the 
wheel at the time of the accident, is 
recovering. 

Another fire of incendiary origin 
broke out in a Berkeley residence last 
week, but owing to the piompt ar- 
rival of the department it did not 
gain headway. This is the fifth fire 
of mysterious origin during the past 
yeai, and all have started in the fash- 
ionable residerce district. 

The members of company 1 of the 
Richmond department entertained 
their wives recently at a whist party 
in the club rooms of the company. 
Several prizes were awarded and an 
enjojable evening was spent, 

A fire of mysterious origin broke 
out in the store of the Girard Piano 
and Furniture Company in Oakland, 
Tuesday morning, and did damage es- 
timated at $30,000. Lieut. Max Dohr- 
man of engine 2 was taken to the re- 
ceiving hospital in a serious condition, 
and several other firemen were over- 
come by the blaze and gas. 

Monthly Meeting Veteran Firemen. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
association was held at their head- 
quarters, 368 Fell street. Tuesday 
evening. July 1st, 1913. All of the 
officers, directors and a large number 
of the members answered roll call. 
The routine business was rapidly dis- 
posed of; an amendment to the law 
was presented, read and passed to its 
second reading. The various com- 
mittees reported progress. The picnic 
committee reported a further collec- 
tion of $85 to $550 reported and 
turned in last meeting, making the 



total so far received, clear of all indebt- 
edness, $635. The By-Law Commit- 
tee reported that the new and revised 
edition of the laws was now in print 
and that they would be ready for dis- 
tribution at our next meeting, August 
5. A committee consisting of Com- 
rades John S. Farley, John J. Cain, 
C. H. Waterman, Chas. F. Healey 
and Jas. J. Britt was appointed to ar- 
range for a ladies' night on the even- 
ing of Labor Day; reply postals will 
be sent out to ascertain the number 
that will participate. The tickets will 
entitle the holder and one lady to ad- 
mission ; the tickets can be transferred 
if in the event of the comrade getting 
the ticket cannot go. The business 
of the evening being concluded, the 
whist tournament held the attention 
of the members until about midnight. 
Refreshments were served during the 
evening. 

Truck 4 Defeats Truck 2. 

July 2 the North Beach Playgrounds 
was the scene of a great battle be- 
tween truck 4 and truck 2. Truck 
4 jumped in the lead in the first in- 
ning by starting a batting rally, and 
when the inning was ended the boys 
from the hill had scored two runs; 
the boys from the beach could do 
nothing with Allen, the hilltop pitcher, 
in their half. 

The second inning started with Lin- 
derberg at the bat, who bunted and 
beat it out; Andrews laid down a nice 
sacrifice, Linderberg going to second; 
Hughes singled and stole, O'Neill 
doubled, scoring Linderberg and 
Hughes; Morgan hit Brennan on top 
of the head which put Charlie to the 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



mat, but you cannot keep a good man 
down; he was up and went to first 
rubbing his bean. Bowler got a walk 
filling the bases and then Comber hit 
a home run clearing the bags. 

Morgan, truck 2's pitcher, then 
steadied down and pitched as nice a 
game of ball as anyone would want to 
see, and inning by inning they cut 
down the long lead, so when the sixth 
inning was reached to score stood 8 
to 6 in favor of the hill boys. 

Truck four sent over three runs in 
.the seventh, Allen walked. Bowler 
singled, Hughes also singled, filling 
up the bases; O'Neill was there with 
a double, scoring Allen and Bowler, 
when Hughes scoring a second later 
on a boot. 

Truck 2 came back in their half; 
Valente singled; Derham was there 
with a drive to center; Lavin pounded 
out a double, scoring Valente: Reidy 
doubled, scoring Derham and Lavin; 
Hackett hit for three bags, Reidy 
scoring; Lavaroni hit one to center 
that looked like a home run, but An- 
drews made a nice catch after a long 
run, ending the game. Final score 
11 to 10 in favor of truck 4. Allen 
and Morgan pitched fine ball and 
Brennan and Lavin did good work 
behind the bat. 

The features were the hitting of 
O'Neill Linderberg, Bowler and Com- 
ber of truck 4, and Hackett, Lavin, 
Derham and Reidy were the stars for 
truck 2. The fielding honors went to 
Andrews, Valente, Lavaroni and Mc- 
Kenna. 

The line up was as follows: 

Truck 1 Truck t 

Allen Pitcher Morgan 

Brennan Caicher Lavin 

Linderberg 1st Base Reidy 

Gavin 2nd Base... .! DUbbs 

Bowler 3rd Base McKe'nna 

Hughes ShortStop Hackett 

O'Neill . Left Field Lavaroni 

Andrews .(enter Field Valente 

Comber ...Right Field ' Derham 

At Sun Diego, .July. 5. when the fire- 
men had extinguished a.small blaze in 
a hotel at Sixth and E streets, they 
discovered that elaborate preparations 
had been made to burp the building, 
in which more that 300 persons were 
sleeping. The firemen found cans of 
distillate, bottles of oil. wiili. wax 



corks turned end down so the oil 
would scatter, saturated excelsior and 
an oiled-soaked string fuse. 

The Astoria Girls' Hose Team. 

The Astoria (Ore.) Girls' Hose Team 
that was organized to compete on July 
4 with similar teams from Lents and 
Gresham, was composed of ten girls, 
ranging from 14 to 18 years of age. 
All the girls had procured" natty uni- 
forms of white 1 ' waists, blue bloomers, 
black stockings and white hats and 
shoes. They were being drilled by 
Fred Brown, who was manager of the 
team, and practiced daily in runs 
with a cart. These races were an 
attractive feature of the land sport's 
programme on the Fourth. 

Portland also had a novel represen- 
tation at the big celebration at Astoria 
on the Fourth of July. In addition to 
the annual regatta there were other 
features and contests, and the girls' 
hose team of the volunteer fire depart- 
ment of Lents were among the fea- 
tures. This organization took part in 
the fire department tournament, be- 
ing entered in three events which 
were classified as the speed, wet and 
dry races. Chas. Breshears was also 
a member of the hose company, which 
was a well-drilled affair that planned 
to go after all the honors attainable 
at Astoria on the Fourth. 



meeting. 

A motion was made to adjourn sub- 
ject to call of the chair. 

C. J. Brennan, Secretary. 



The Pacific Fireman $2.00 a year. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



FOR the man in any line who plans to achieve, who ex- 
pects to win high place in h>s chosen culling, tl nt 
could be no better investment than a HOWAUD 
Watch. Living wiln a HOWARD is the surest way to 
absorb the accuracy, the pur ctuality. and practical time- 
saving that America's successful men demand as a mat- 
ter of course. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for It. 

The [nice of each watch Is fixed at the fac- 
tory, anci a printed ticket attached — from the 
17-i-w.l • double roller) in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-fitted case at $40. to the ?3- 
jewel at $150— and the Edward Howard model 
at $sr,.t 

Admiral Slgsbee has written a little book, 
"The Log of the Howard Watch," gj\ lnp the 
record of his own Howard in the U. S. N"a\y. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card. Dent N\ 
and we'll send you a copy. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Ma.. 



Meeting David Scannell Club. 

A specially-called meeting of the 
David Scannell Club was held June 
23rd. 1913. at Veteran Firemen's ball. 
368 Fell street. 

The meeting was calhd to order bj 
President Alexander George. 

First Vice-President Gallatin, Treas- 
urer S. J. Spear and Directors Brt w n 
and Siewert were absent. 

On motion regularly made, seconded 
and carried, the Constitution of the 
club as submitted at the previous 
meeting, with correctors of typo- 
graphical errors, was arid l> ri subject 
to majority vote of the club numln f. 

On motion the president was d- 
i rected to appointed a committee pi 
two to wait on the ma\ or. 

On motion the president was direct- 
ed to appoint a commiitee of one on 
adoption of official club button, said 
committee to report on same at next 



T. H. KILOO 
DIAMONDS and jbwelry 

71 WAU.tR ST.. VAN FRANCISCO 

Home phon* S 2^ I 7 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Propnetor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296 -98 (iEARY STREET 

Neat Brodent k 
Trk-phonr We* 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

A«ent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



THE 

Dr. John Trip p Remedy Company 

POSITIVELY Cl'RES 
Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh. Rheumatism, 
Cancer, Goitre, Tumorous Growths. Malaria. 
Erysipelas. Scrofula, Lupus. Salt Rheum. Ne- 
crosis, Kidney Diseases, Enlarged Glands and 
Joints aod all illood Diseases. 

479 TURK STREET . JAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC 



i K E M A N 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Bessie Barriscale's return to the 
Alcazar Theatre next Monday evening 
promises to be a notable event, for 
the locally popular little actress comes 
as a full-fledged star and has just 
concluded a very successful transcon- 
tinental tour. Accompanying her is 
Howard Hickman, who also is a fav- 
orite of the Alcazar's clientele, and 
supporting them will be Belasco & 
Mayer's complete acting corps. An 
unusually heavy advance sale of seals 
assures crowded audiences throughout 
the coming week. Charmingcomedy 
is "Such a Little Queen," the medium 
of Miss Barriscale's reappearance in 
the O'Farrell-street playhouse. It 
was written by Channing Pollock, 
author of "In the Bishop's Carriage" 
and other successes, and when pro- 
duced in New York, where it scored 
a season's run, the critics pronounced 
it his masterpiece. In uniqueness of 
conception and quaintness of treat- 
ment it has few equals. 

Empress Theatre. 

The Empress management an- 
nounces a varied programme for Sun- 
day afternoon, with Porter J. White, 
the distinguished legitimate star, as 
the headline attraction, in "Scandal," 
proclaimed the best of the miniature 
dramas ever presented by this versa- 
tile and highly pleasing legitimate 
star. Emma Francis, a danseuseand 
singer and her young whirlwind Ara- 
bians will be the added feature, ap- 
pearing in a versatile act that comes 
close to headline honors. The Booth 
Trio keep the audience in continuous 
laughter in their novel and snappy 
cycling performance. Gus Hibbert 
and Harold Kennedy, two comedians 
who use burnt coke, will present a 
routine of songs and patter that keep 
the audience in a merry mood. Fred 
Pisano and Katherine Bingham are 
programmed for several character 
impersonal. ions songs and dialect 
numbers. Morris and Beasley will 
offer catchy songs and artistic danc- 
ing in their refined absurdity entitled 
"Manicure." McCormick and Mc- 
Cormick, manipulators and jugglers, 
Essanc.eescope motion pictures and 
the Empress orchestra are features of 
a bill full of good entertainment. 



Gorham Motor-Propelled Pumping Engines 



SOLD IN CALIFORNIA 




TYPE OP SIRAIGHT PUMPING ENGINE 



Oakland I Straight Pump 9 San Diego I Combination Hose & Pump 



2 Pasadena 

3 San Diego 

4 Los Angeles 

5 Los Angeles 

6 Los Angeles 

7 San Diego 

8 San Diego 



Combination Hose & Pump 10 Visalia 

I I Bakersneld 



I 



I 2 Los Angeles 1 

I 3 Los Angeles ... I Straight Pump 

1 4 Los Angeles 1 Combination Hose & Pump 

1 5 Sacramento 1 



Note. — There are more Gorham Motor Propelled Pumping Engines sold and in service in 
the State of California than all other makes combined 

There is a reason. IS~ MERIT TELLS. ASK THE CITY THAT OWNS ONE 

Gorham Fire Apparatus Company 



SEATTLE 

82 & 84 W. Marion Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Steeet 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 Souih Olive Sued 



When Vou're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

I ^^ == a to your motor (and your purse) to 

feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 

to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Sole Distributor for the Pnclflc Const 843 Onlden Clnte Ave.. San rmnclsco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 



P 



>ACIFI 




IREMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H.G.PRESTON Business Manager 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance S2.00 

Six months 1.00 



ADVERTISEMENTS 
Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 
continuous ones. 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



No date has been named for the conference 
with the Mayor and the Fire ano the Civil 
Service Boards whether one or three names 
shall be certified. 



Fire as a Civilizer. 



At a meeting of the Pension Board Friday 
Engineer Barricks was granted a pension, 
to take effect August 1, having put in 26 
years in the department. The Arata and 
Girnt applications will come up next Monday 
evening. 

Dr. Madison of San Diego, who committed 
suicide in his cell Wednesday, was held for 
arson as a result of the fire in the Owl China 
store, under the Leland Hotel, of which he 
was the owner. He admitted setting fire to 
the hotel to secure the insurance. He also 
made a partial confession of a life of crime in 
several cities. 



In the current issue of the N. Y. Municipal 
Journal appears a decision handed down by 
Judge Hamilton of the Circuit Court of Port- 
land sustaining the Executive Board of that 
city in the matter of purchasing fire appara- 
tus, which goes far toward clearing up the 
point freqently brought up that a munici- 
pality has the right to accept other than the 
lowest bids. The article in full will appear 
in the next issue of the Pacific Fireman. 



The discovery of fire by prehistoric man 
was a great step in his progress toward civi- 
lization, as it resulted in his forsaking trees 
in which hs had slept for centuries, owing to 
the fear of being devoured by the wild ani- 
mals of the forests which roamed after night- 
fall; for during the daylight he was able to 
avoid them, being active and swift of foot, 
and when night came he slept secure in caves 
by keeping a fire at the entrance, besides 
making it possible for him to cook his raw 
fish which the tides had thrown up on the 
ocean beach, making it much more palatable. 
It is owing to the discovery of fire by primitive 
man that we have made progress step by 
step up to the present. 

Through fire, utilized with water, we have 
been able to send locomotives across conti- 
nents at 60 miles an hour and ships to for- 
bign ports in less than one-third of the time 
it took sailing vessels. In the hands of civi- 
lized man, fire, when rightly utilized, is the 
greatest of all blessings to mankind; but, in 
the hands of the thoughtless and careless, it 
has resulted in the loss of thousands of hu- 
man lives and the destruction of property in 
billions of dollars throughout the civilized 
world. 

With fire, combined with water, we heat 
our houses, cook our food, drive all sorts of 
machinery in shops, mines, etc. Without it 
this great American continent would never 
have been discovered; our ancestors would 
have been compelled to continue to struggle 
along on the banks of the Nile, where human 
life is said to have first emanated or some 
other tropical clime, where clothing is not 
absolutely necessary; where population would 
soon become so dense that the strong would 
kill and devour the weak in the struggle for 
existence. In fine, without the discovery of 
fire, we would simply be no better than a race 
of canibals— civilization would have been im- 
possible. 



The San Francisco Underwriters' Fire Patrol 
has recently placed an order for their fourth 
American La France motor service wagon. 
As was the case with their last or third car 
ordered from the same people, no competitive 
bids were asked for. The Fire Patrol direc- 
torate and Superintendent Comstock are fully 
convinced that the American La France is 
the ideal motor apparatus for San Francisco 
conditions. The first of these cars was 
pi iced in service in the San Francisco Fire 
Patrol in Mav, 1911. Up to this time this 
piece of apparatus has travekd over two 
thousand miles to and from fires and has 
never vet gone to the shop for repairs or ad- 
justment of any kind. Wilh the exception 
of pneumatic tire up-keep {with which tvpe 
of tires this car is equipped) the only expen- 
ses thus far on this apparatus are represented 
by bills for gasoline and oil. 

Carl Miller of engine company 2*2 of Los 
Angeles was a visitor to this office this week. 



The Mt. Tamalpias Conflagration. 

The Examiner of Thursday, in its account 
of the result and cause of the Mt. Tamalpias 
fire, in a brief summary says, under the fol- 
lowing head, "Here's What Happened:" 

A cigarette was tossed out of a car window. 
This is what happened: 

Muir Woods, one of the most beautiful 
natural resorts in the world, is a sheet of 
flame. 

The crown of Mt. Tamalpias, loved play- 
ground of city dwellers, is a great, black 
cinder 

The towns of Mill Valley. Larkspur, Corte 
Madera and Kentfield are fighting back walls 
of fire. 

Six thousand acres of magnificent timber 
land has been laid waste. 

Scores of beautiful country residences, cot- 
tages and bungalows, hidden in the wooded 
retreats, are menaced by unquenchable fire. 

For three davs four thousand men, soldiers 
firemen and civilians are fighting four widely 
distributed acres of fire. The flames have 



denuded the crown of Tamalpias, devastated 
6,000 acres of timber land, burned the cotta- 
ges and temporary structures at Muir Woods. 

The Marin county residents who are fight- 
ing side by side with the smoke-grimed sol- 
diers and sailors, to save their homes, number 
about 3,000. Of these, 1,500 are in Mill Val- 
ley and the othersin Larkspur, Corte Madera, 
Kentfield and the surrounding canyons. 

The fire started from a careless thrown 
cigarette on the southwest shoulder of Tam- 
alpias Monday morning, worked eastward for 
two days, leaped into Blithdale canyon and 
roared down within striking distance of Mill 
Valley early Wednesaay evening. Soldiers 
and citizens fought to the last pitch ol de- 
speration. The wave of fire was beaten back, 
but another came from the west. A hidden . 
tendril of flame had crept into the deep Muir 
Woods, the fire leaped among them, and a 
second widening blaze swept down toward 
the village. 

Wednesday night chief Murphy, it is re- 
ported, sent the fireboat David Scannell, with 
thirty firemen and two fire engines and 12,000 
feet of hose in charge of Battalion Chief 
Cook. The hose was laid up Larkspur canyon, 
whence all residents had fled, and at an early 
hour Thursday morning the firemen were 
making a stubborn fight. 

Thursday morning Asst. Chief Maxwell of 
the San Francisco Fire Department and Wm. 
Richie took charge of 1000 men in Cascade 
canyon and began the constructian of a fire- 
break to protect the reservoir and the water- 
pipe line. 

Henry Glynn of engine 8 of this department 
is reported to have been 6eriously injured. 
He was brushed from his seat on the chemical 
by the limb of a tree after helping to extin- 
guish a small blaze west of Mill Valley, 
Thursday. 

As we go to press the fate of the above 
four towns rests with the winds. More troops 
are to be rushed to the scene of the great 
mountain fire, as fierce [flames shoot high 
from surrounding quarters. 

Battalion Chief Britt collapsed at quarters 
Thursday as the result of partial asphyxiation 
late Wednesday from the fumes of nitric acid 
while fighting a fire in the McPike drug store, 
204 Fourth street. After the fire he com- 
plained of feeling ill and went to his home. 
He reported for duty Thursday morning, but 
soon after lapsed into unconsciousness and 
was conveyed to the Harbor Emergency 
Hospital. His condition is said to be serious. 

We are pleased to announce that nothing 
more serious than a general shaking up befell 
Battalion Chief Boden in the collision of his 
buggy with a vehicle at East and Pacific 

streets last Monday. 



ROSENBLlM=ABRAHAM CO. Inc. 

TAILORS FOR MBPs' 

IIOS MARKET ST. 

ODD FELLOWS BUILDING 

Phone M.rlcet 1 503 

UNIFORMS OUR SPECIALTY UNION LABEL USED 



PACIFIC KlKEMAN 



Seattle. 

[Spe 3 iaT Correspondence. 1 

Another suit has been filed in Seattle to 
compel the Board of Public Works and Chief 
Stetson to cancel their contract with the Sea- 
grave Company for motor hook and ladder 
trucks and buy to suit certain politicians. 
These latter were adroit enough to come in 
with a lower bid, but the total saving to the 
city by buying of them would be only $125 
out of a total of over $20,000 The last suit 
in the same cause was thrown out of court 
because the plaintiff, who was the only wit- 
ness called, swore that his companies were 
incorporated in this ttate and that he was a 
taxpayer, and it was promptly shown that 
! none of his statements vv»ere true. Chief 
Stetson has had many years of experience 
and has gone through the east looking ai 
motor apparatus. The fact that he failed to 
find any such as these people are trying to 
sell in Seattle may be his misfortune, but 
there is no reason why he should be attacked 
and abused because of it. 















Portland (Ore.) Fire News. 

[Syecial Correspondence.] 

Portland, Ore., July 7. 1913. 

July 1st saw the end of the Mayor and 
Council form of government and the installa- 
tion of the Commission form. The fire de- 
partment is known as the Bureau of Fire and 
is under the direct supervision of Mayor 
Albee. The new charter and form of gov- 
ernment does not affect civil service. 

Portland firemen now have a pension law in 
effect. They have 1 4>er cent deducted from 
their salary warrants by the city treasurer 
each month which goes to the fund; also all 
presents and bequests, all fines on the mem- 
bers for misdemeanors and breaking of rules 
and a tax levy of one-tenth of 1 mill on the 
taxpayers makes up the fund. In case of ac- 
cident ihe bovs draw full salary for a period 
not to exceed one year. In case of sickness 
they draw half salary for a period not. to ex- 
ceed three months. In case of death iheir 
dependants receive one-half salary. A fire- 
man who has twenty years' service in and is 
50 years old is eligible to retirement on half 
salary. Any member who becomes totally 
disabled is eligible to pension on half salary. 

The old fire hell which has sounded the 
boxes in Portland for forty years has been 
taken down from the tower 1 in the. r<ear of 
engine 1, as the tower is considered unsafe 
for i'ts weighty which, with its frame, is 4M*7 
pounds. The firemen want it placed in the 
firemen's plot in Lone Kir Cemetery to b,e 
us.-d ;is h monument. 

Plans for an immense concert are being 
prepared by I be leader of I be band and Chief 
Stevens. The Firemen's and Police Band will 
Unite in making it a grand success. 

The new aerial truck has been accepted by 
the city and paid for. During the tests n 
made .'JB miles per hour on the level. 

The largest cash payment ever made by 
the city treasurer was made to A. G. Long 
f.»r lire apparatus purchased recently. Mr. 
Long carried $52,000 away from the treas- 



urer's ■windowJrtVa canvas hag. 

Ex Mayor Rushlight was presented with a 
handsome silver loving cup by the members 
of the Executive Board at the close of their 
last meeting. 

The Multnomah Truck and Bag Company's 
large plant at ^Kenton burned with a loss of 
about $1:H),000. The plant is outside the city 
limits, but. a telephone alarm was responded 
to by Asst. Chief Lrudenkloss with engine 30 
and engine 13, the new auto pump and hose 
wagon. The St. Johns Fire Department was 
entertaining the vohirteers from the Kenton 
and Peninsula departments, and when the fire 
was discovered the boys immediately grabbed 
what turn out coats and helmets they could 
get their hands on and were ai the fire, three 
and a half miles distant, in 30 minutes. 

Several apparently incendiar\ blazes have 
been found by the firemen recently. 

Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
July 11, 'we take the following excerpts from 
the Administrative Committee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From the Board of Fire Pension Fund Com- 
missioners, advising the Board that the fol- 
lowing members of the department have been 
retired on pension: George McDonald, hose- 
man engine 23, for physical disability, to take 
effect July 1. 1913; John Wills, battalion 
Chief, for full term of service, to take effect 
July 1. 1913; Leo M. Castillo, truckman truck 
12, for full term of service, to take effect July 
7, 1913. Filed. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the application of T. J. Keohane for a 
transfer from truckman truck 12 to truckman 
truck 1 be granted. Approved.,. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, rela- 
tive to providing Dayton airless tires for the 
motor-driven American-La France chemical 
engine. Recommend that the Superintendent 
of Engines be directed to prepare specifica- 
tions with a view to advertising for bids for 
these tires. 

From W. H. Vogel, hoseman engine 17, 
requesting that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for fifteen days, without pay, com- 
mencing July 31. Granted 

From Battalion Chief Boden, submitting 
monthly report relative to the conduct of 
John McCarthy, under suspension for six 
months for an infringement of the rules, as 
directed by the Board Filed. 

From W. J. Harrington, hoseman engine45, 
tendering Ids resignation as a member of the 
department, to lake « fifed from July J.. 

Accepted 

From R S. Sheehan, truckman truck 1, 
tendering his resignation as a member of I he 
department, to take effect from July 1. 

Accept ed. 

From George M. Mealy, hoseman engine 
17, tendering his resignation as a member of 
the department , to take etfecl from July 1. 
Accepted. 

From 11. II. Walsh, hoseman engine 10, 
tendering bis resignation as a member of the 
department, to take etfecl from July 1. 



Accepted. 

From W. P. Delany, machinist at the cor- 
poration yard, requesting that he be granted 
permission to leave the city for two weeks, 
on account of sickness. Granted. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, sub- 
mitting a complaint against B. A. Davis, 
watchman at the corporation yard, for fail- 
ing to report for dutv at the corporation yard 
on July 2. Ordered charges be filed. 

From Charles N. Black. General Manager 
United Railroads, submitting a complaint 
against some person who stated that he was 
a member of this depar meut and holder of 
badge No. 252, for assaulting Conductor S. L. 
Burnside of that company on June 21. Re- 
ferred to chief engineer for investigation and 
report. 

From Battalion Chief Radford, submitting 
a complaint, a) I tying that Frank Powers, 
hoseman engine 13, acting in an ungentle- 
manly manner while on duty on July 2. In 
view of the fact that this complaint was re- 
ceived over the telephone by the captain of 
engine 13, from some person who refused to 
give his name, and that your committee is 
not in possession of any facts to; substantiate 
this complaint, we recommend that the mat- 
ter be placed on file. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the application of J. H. Collins for a 
transfer from hoseman engine 29 to hoseman 
engine 45 be granted, to take effect on the 
16th instant. Granted. 



Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

From John T. Lahey, lieut. engine 18, re- 
questing a leave of absence for one year, 
without pay', commencing July 14. from his 
regular rank and position of lieutenant. 
Granted. 

Consideration of bids for inner and outer 
sectional tube units for fire engine boilers. 
Commissioner Dillon to report on above. 
Awarded to American-La France Company. 

Consideration of bids for one or more steam 
fire engines with gasoline motor tractors at- 
tached. Put over to Monday. 

Consideration of bids for furnishing one or 
more gasoline motor tractors. Put over to 
Monday. 

From the Civil Service Commission, certi- 
fying John J. O'Brien from its eligible list of 
blacksmiths' helpers for appointment. Ap- 
pointed. 

Resolution requesting the Civil Service 
Commission to certify four eligible* from its 
list of firemen for temporary appointment as 
substitutes. Approved. 

A San Mateo dispatch says a fire Wednes- 
day morning destroyed the factory and wate 

house of the Pacific Bone. Coal and Fertiliz- 
ing Company of thai city, entailing a loss of 
$Kni.tinu. 



I rlr[>tir>nr Douubu 1255 

L. J. BORCK, 1 " 1 frAiLOH 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

RIRKMKIN'S '. • UNIFORMS 

also FINE CIVILIAN sins 
193 EDDY STREET San Franciico 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



American -La France Fire Engine Co. 



OF CALIFORNIA 



151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...PL.ORISTS... 



BROWN & KENNEDY LOTS $150 

FLORAL 



$150 LOTS 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special cUfcnftOn giren to \WdiUng and Funeral Order*. 

ArtiMtir Decoration* ami Itexigtts. 

Gardening, /-Jtc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Kkach Nurseiues. take Castro street car to 23rd. 01 

Mission. 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 




EASV TERMS 



I IN 



I 12 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 



717 K Street 

Sacramento 



EAGLESON & CO. 



Imporle . ,nd M I« 



dl — * Home M 1615 
""""•i Vl.rk.-t 5725 

FUNERAL WORK A SPECIALTY 

LOWKST PRICKS 

3091 SIXTEENTH STREET 

NEAR VALENCIA 
UNION STORE SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Dougl.t 287 1 



MENS FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1 1 18 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 

Plume M.rkel 54 1 7 SAN FRANCISCO 



WAkRANT BROKIRS 



Phone Douglas 4716 



Home C 2458 



LAMANETBROS 

HATS. UNDHRWEAR. V.TC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Ooods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



73 THIWD 


SIRHKT 








3AN FRANCISCO 


\A/M. 


F. 


EGAN 






M. R. C. 


V. S. 




VKTKKINARY 


SURUEON TO S. F. F. D.. 


1 


1153 OOI.DF.N 


GATE AYE. 




IVIfi.h.m**?" 1'aik 117 


.nd 118 


SWi Franciuco 


Cal. 



Marine View Terrace 

(THE PIEDMONT OF RICHMOND) 
DON'T" 

let this opportunity pass by. This is absolutely 
your last chance to get close in property at such 
prices and terms. 

Only seven minutes walk from the 
City Hall. Ashland Avenue will reach 
Marine View Terrace through themuiiicijal 
tunnel and continue on through the ent re Itnfcth 
of the property to the new ferry from which boats 
will run regularly to and Irom :>an Francisco. 

Bonds have been sold and the mom y is 
now in the hands of the Cily Treasurer fcr the 
immediate construction of these improven m's 
and values will double and treble in a \eiy 
short time. 

Don't delay — buy now instead of 
wishing you had later on. 

For maps or further information, see or write 

WENHAM & PAUL 

1444 San Pablo Ave., Oakland. California 




VOL. X.-NO. 35 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 19, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Court Sustains Fire Apparatus Purchase 



The following is Circuit Judge Ham- 
ilton's decision upholding the Execu- 
tive Fire Committee of the City of 
Portland in the matter of purchasing 
$63,000 worth of motor fire apparatus, 
which was awarded to the American- 
La France Fire Engine Company re- 
cently, published in the N. Y. Muni- 
cipal Journal of June 26, is of vital 
interest to practically everyone in the 
fire apparatus business, from which 
we quote: 

Circuit JudgeHamilton handed down 
an opinion sustaining the action of 
the Executive Board of the city in pur- 
chasing $63,000 worth of fire appara- 
tus from the American-La France Fire 
Engine Company, in October, 1912. 
The apparatus has been delivered and 
is in use, but the Mayor, City Auditor 
and City Treasurer were restrained 
from issuing the warrants for the pay- 
ment of the account by a suit which 
\\;ts Tiled several mouths ago by D. R. 
Young, a taxpayer. This was the suit 
which was decided recently, and the 
decision leaves the city officials free in 
pay the bill. Young asked a perma- 
nent injunction against the city offi- 
cials cm I he ground that the La France 
people were not the lowest bidders 
for the engines, and that the Execu- 
tive Board had abused its discretion 
in awarding the contract to the con- 
cern. Other bidders for supplying 
the engines were the Nott-Joslyn Com- 
pany, the Pacific Coast Fire Supply 
Company, the White Company, H. L. 
Keats Company and the Ahrens-Fox 
Company. The Nott Company sub- 
mitted lowest bids on some of I he ap- 



paratus required. "The provision of 
the city charter which requires an ad- 
vertisement for all supplies over $250, 
is mandatory," said the judge in ren- 
dering his opinion. "However, it is 
not mandatory in every case to award 
the contract to the lowest bidder. 
Where the question is quality alone 
and all bidders are offering to supply 
goods of equal quality, the lowest re- 
sponsible bidder should prevail. But 
every case must be determined on its 
own peculiar circumstances. The 
Executive Board in this instance was 
looking for engines that would best 
answer the purposes of the city. They 
decided to purchase the La France 
engines because they found them supe- 
rior. Such discretion is necessarily 
vested in the board. It should be 
governed not only by the lowest bid, 
'but by other circumstances as well. 
It was important that they should se- 
cure the best, and as no bad faith is 
alleged, the board was justified in its 
action. The court will not set aside 
the contract and will dissolve the 
temporary injunction already issued." 
The apparatus furnished by the La 
France people included a motor t n c k 
pumping and hose car and eight chemi- 
cal and hose motor cars. 



Leading to Two-Platoon. 

An ordinance has been unanimously 
passed by the Beloit, Wis., Council 
which, it is freely said, means a 
straight two-platoon system for the 
fire department in a year or two. 
The new ordinance, recommended by 
Chief J. E. Nygren in a recent report, 
provides for the addition of three full- 
paid and two call men to the depart- 
ment, so that henceforth there will 
never be fewer than eight men on 
duty at each of the two stations under 
a new schedule of time on and off. 
By this schedule the men will be 
divided into squads, so that each man 
will be on duty for 24 continuous hours, 
and then get a lay-off of 12 hours. 
Before going on duty he will eat a 
meal at home and take two meals with 
him which he will eat in the fire 

station. 

Firemen's Pension Fund. 



Chief C. W. Anderson, Sacramento, 
Cal., was seriously injured on June 20 
in an $18,000 blaze thai started in the 
t Hickman i urniiure sioi e and gulti d 

an adjoining apartment. He had just 
recovered from an attack of appendi- 
citis and fell down stairs, reopening 
the wound. He was forced to undergo 
a second opera! inn. ('apt. F. C. .lager, 

chemical 1. has been appointed acting 
duel of the department, 



An ordinance is being considered at 
Hutchinson, Kan., providing for a fire- 
men's pension and relief fund. The 
fund is te carry an accident policy of 
not more than $3,000 for the chief and 
assistant chief and $2,000 for the fire- 
men. It must pay $100 on the funeral 
of a fireman or it may pa.\ as a gra- 
tuity to the widow, children or bene- 
ficiaries of a fireman who dies as the 
result of bis services, the sum of |E00 
in addition to the accident policy. The 
association can pension those who 
have served during a period of twenty 
years and who are unfit for further 
service, a sum not to exceed one half 
of their salary. If the City Commis- 
sion retires a man who has served 

twenty years ho must be pensioned. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Fireman's Dog First to Get to Blaze. 

"There goes that fool dog again," 
said a fireman yesterday, as the fire 
truck from Seventeenth and Washing- 
ton streets swung out of the house, 
with "Stub," the Boston Bull owned 
by Chief Young, barking at the horses' 
heels. "He is going to get his some 
day," added the fireman. 

The same thing has been said of 
this dog every day for two years, yet 
he has always easily escaped the awful 
fate that has been predicted for him. 
Stub is the most regular attendant 
among the members of the Portland 
Fire Department, at the various fires 
that the firemen are called upon to 
combat. He always attends a fire 
with his boss, Battalion Chief John 
Young, and many times goes without 
Young. 

Every time a fire alarm taps, either 
at the engine house or at the home of 
Chief Young, Stub rushes for the 
front door of the fire station to act as 
escort for the horses. From that, 
however, it must not be understood 
that every time the firebell rings that 
Stub jumps. 

Many of the helh that ring at the 
fire house are only signals, and if it is 
a signal bell that rings, Stub will 
merely prick up his ear, bat one eye, 
and go to sleep again, but if it is an 
alarm, Stub is the first to be on the 
job. He knows the difference. 

Some time less than a year ago. 
Stub was on the second floor of a fire 
hall when an alarm came in. The door 
to the stairway leading down to the 
first floor was closed, but there was 
a window open, and through that 
jumped the dog, falling 17 feet to the 
cement sidewalk below. Stub did not 
attend that fire nor several others that 
followed close after, but it did not stop 
him one whit, when he recovered from 
a few bruises. 

Stub strayed away from home yes- 
terday, and when Chief Young thought 
of him, he called up a certain fire house 
and asked for his pet. When told that 
he was there, the chief asked tl at the 
telephone receiver be put, to the dog's 
ear. 

"Stub, you come home, right away," 
said the chief over the telephone. In 
ten minutes Stub scratched at the 
front door. 



This particular canine is extremely 
fastidious and there are only two 
places he will eat — at home and at a 
certain down-town restaurant where 
he has a standing invitation, which he 
accepts from one to three times daily. 

"Sometime I expect he will get 
caught under the horses' feet," said 
Chief young, "but I can't keep him 
away from the animals, so let him go. " 

Tamalpias Fire Only a Memory. 

Only a smoky memory is left of the 
Tamalpias forest fire, that and a trifle 
of smoldering around Muir Woods, 
where a detachment of soldiery is on 
guard ready to stamp out the first 
signs of a blaze. 

Above the Larkspur slopes to the 
main mountain ridges the fire is defi- 
nitely out. The same above Mill Val- 
ley and the same along all the lower 
line of the fire's havoc, with the one 
small exception of the extreme wes- 
terly end of the line where it impinges 
on the big tree area. 

Most of the troops have been with- 
drawn and the militia, which worked 
in accord with the regulars and fores- 
ters, will assist at the final obsequies. 

Hannaberry to Head Martinez Fire Dept. 



An automobile of the Hillsborough 
Fire Department was wrecked early 
last week while responding to a fire 
alarm at San Bruno. It crashed into 
a disabled touring car belonging to 
A. L. Dressen of Burlingame which 
had been abandoned in the road. The 
firemen insist that there were no 
lights on the machine. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



FOR the man in any line who plans to achieve, who ex- 
pects t<i win ln^li iilaee in his chosen calling, there 
could be no better investment ihan a HOWARD 
Watch. Living with a HOWARD is the sorest way to 
absorb the accuracy, the punctuality, and practical time- 
saving that Ameiica's successful men demand as a mat- 
ter of course. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jewel) r in \ nur town and talk to 
him. He is a Koorl man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
ility, ami a printed ticket attached — from the 
17- i- w.l i double roller) in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case it $40. to the ?3- 
iewe] at $150 — and the Edward Howard model 
at 1351). 

Admiral SIgSbee lias written a little book, 

"The Log nf the Howard Watch," giving the 
record of his own Howard in the L". S. Navy. 
STou'll ei ."' M Drop us a post-card, Dept. N. 
ami we'n send you a copy. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AIND JEWELRY 

71 WA11.KR ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



The Contra Costa Gazette of July 12 
says William Hanneberry. one of the 
most enthusiastic and faithful mem- 
bers i>f the Martinez Fire Department, 
was honored by his fellow tire-lighters 
Wednesday night by being elected to 
the office of chief of the department 
to succeed John Briones. 

When Constable C. H. Palmer de- 
clined to act as assistant owiig to the 
press of other duties, B. B. Rogers 
was named and his election was made 
unanimous. Frank R. Jones was re- 
elected secretary and Fred Johnson, 
Jr., was elected to care for the funds 
of the department, which he has done PhoeniX Fire Appliance Co 
for several years. 



The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIK Propnelor 

The BEST TAILOR-MADE FIREMEN'S SHIRTS 

OUR SPECIALTY 
2>06-98 (ifiARY STREET 

Comet Brodemk 
Telephone We.1 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Anent Northern California for the 



Governor Signs Two-Platorn Bill. 

On June 26 Gov. Dunne of Illinois 
signed the two-platoon bill, which 
affects the Chicago Fire Department. 
This measure, before it becomes opera- 
tive, must be voted on favorobly by 
the people at a referendum election. 
It requires a majority of tl use voting 
on the proposition, and not a majoritj 
of those voting at the election. 



1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



The Dr. John Tripp Remedy 

POS1T1VEL1 CURES 

Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh, Rheumatism, 
Cancer, Goitre. Tumorous Growths, Malaria, 
Erysipelas, Scrofula, Lupus, Salt Rheum, Ne- 
crosis, Kidney Diseases, Enlarged Glands and 
Joints aod all Elood Diseases. 



479 TURK STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PAC1 K'JC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Forrest Stanley, who returns to the 
Alcazar Theatre next Monday evening 
to serve as Bessie Barriscale's co-star 
during 1 the remainder of her season 
there, is well and favorably remem- 
bered by San Francisco's play patrons, 
for he was Liurette Taylor's leading 
man when she was under Belasco & 
Mayer's management last summer, and 
he then proved himself to be an actor 
richly endowed with personal mag- 
netism and histrionic ability. James 
Forbes' successful American comedy, 
"The Traveling Salesman," which will 
be the medium of Mr. Stanley's reap- 
pearance in theO'Farrell-street home 
of drama, was chosen because it ena- 
bled him to score an emphatic hit in 
the east and affords Miss Barriscale 
almost equal opportunity to do effec- 
tive work. He will be seen as Bob 
Blake, a typical commercial tourist, 
and she has Beth Elliott, the pretty 
ticket-seller at a village railroad sta- 
tion in the middle west. These two 
characters are surrounded by more 
than a dozen others, each of whom is 
familiar to anyone who has studied 
the iuhabitants of a small town. 

Empress Theatre. 

The Exposition Four, emperors of 
mirth and melody; John White and 
his Comedy Animal Circus and "The 
Trainer," a pretty story of the turf, 
will make up a triple headline bill at 
the Enpress on Sunday afternoon. 
White's Comedy Circus is making its 
second appearance. Unridable mules, 
leaping hounds and dog actors that 
are particularly pleasing to the chil- 
dren go through their performance 
with remarkable intelligence. "The 
Trainer" is an artistic little sketch 
which unfolds a story written around 
a former trainer, who bets on a Ken- 
tucky horse to provide the comforts in 
his home, over which the stork hovers. 
Tin') Lifchtner and Dolly Jordan, win- 
si 'a) ■ co nediennes, furnish a singing, 
'1 in 'i.ig and piano playing act. Ray- 
mond I'-il will be another lug comedy 
spot with an abundance of funny paro- 
dies and stories. Marcou, a shadow- 
graph expert is a clever performer in 
his line, making almost every con- 
ceivable object with his hands and 
projecting 1 hem upon the canvas. 
Male. Lorraine and her operatic trio 
and theKssancee.scope wind up the hill. 



Gorham Motor-Propelled Pumping Engines 



SOLD IN CALIFORNIA 



\Pt 




TYPE OF STRAIGHT PUMPING ENGINE 



1 Oakland . 

2 Pasadena 

3 San Diego 

4 Los Angeles 

5 Los Angeles 

6 Los Angeles 

7 San Diego 

8 San Diego 



I Straight Pump 
Combination Hose & Pump 



9 San Diego I Combination Hose & Pump 

10 Visalia .1 " 

I I Bakersfield 1 " 

1 2 Los Angeles I 

I 3 Los Angeles ... I Straight Pump 
I 4 Los Angeles I Combination Hose & Pump 
1 5 Sacramento I 



Note. — There are more Gorham Motor Propelled Pumping Engines sold and in service in 
the State of California than all other makes combined 



lb 



ere is a reason. 



MERIT TELLS. ASK THE CITY THAT OWNS ONE 



Gorham Fire Apparatus Company 



SEATTLE 

82&84W Marion Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Steeet 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 South Olive Street 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD !. BILL 

Sole Distributor tor the Pnclflc Copst 543 Onlilcn flnte Ave, Fnn Tranc'lsco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 



P 



•acifi 




1REMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 
One year, in advance . LOO 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 
Inserted on the most favorable terms. especially [urge nod 

continuous »nf<, 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. T elephone F ranklin 6867, 

Entered as second-class matter March 21, L90P. at the 
Post office at San Francisco. Cal.. undei the Act nf Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



Stockton, Redding, Chico, Placerville, Nana 
and Los Banos suffered severe losses from 
fire during the past week. San Francisco 
has been fortunate in only having a few 
minor blazes. 



In a brief talk Monday night with Attorney 
Williams, he informed us that the Maxwell 
case had been appealed to theSupremeCourt, 
and looked for a reversal of JudgeMurasky's 
recent decision. 



At the meeting of the Fire Commission 
Friday the matter of requesting the Civil 
Service Commission to certify eligibles to fill 
vacancies in the department was deferred 
uniil after the conference of both Boards 
with Mayor Rnlph, which is to be held Thurs- 
day evening at 8 o'clock. 



At a meeting of the Board of Fire Pension 
Fund Commissioners last Monday night the 
following action was taken: The application 
of Guiseppe and Rosa Arata, parents of the 
late Lieut. Arata, was granted, to take effect 
July 1. The petition of Margaret E. Girot, 
widow of deceased, was laid over in order to 
determine his rank in the department. Girot, 
up to the lime of his death, was a machinist 
at the corporation yard. It was claimed by 
his wife, through her attorney, that Girot 
was a hoseman in a relief company and re- 
sponded to second alarms and had a tapper in 
his home. The case was referred to City 
Attorney Long for an opinion. 

The Commissioners of the Fire Pension 
Fund, in iheir annual report to I he Board of 
Supervisors last Saturday, for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, showed that $84,022.41 were 
paid out in pension benefits and other expen- 
ditures during the year. Twelve members of 
the department were retired because of inju- 
ries received in the discharge of their duties; 
six members were retired after completing 
their terms of service and that three widows 
of firemen, killed in the discharge of their 
duties, were granted pensions; that there are 
at present 110 pensioners on the roll, receiv- 
ing pensions ranging from $120 to $624 per 
quarter. Of the $87,000 available for pen- 
sions and incidental expenses during the fiscal 
year ending June 30, there is a balance on 
hand of only $2,977.79. 



The penny wise and pound foolish action of 
the Finance Committee of the Board of Super- 
visors in failing to recommend an appropria- 
tion to enable Chief Murphy to attend the 
annual convention of the Pacific Coast Fire 
Chiefs to be held in Tacoma, Wash., next 
month, also the International Association of 
Fire Engineers in New York City in Septem- 
ber, is certainly to be deplored by every pro- 
gressive citizen who has the efficiency of the 
tire department at heart. It is thought if 
( 'hie!' Murphy was enabled to ai tend the New 
York convention he might be able to persuade 
thai body to meet in this city in 1915. The 
committee is certainly sitting on the lid all 
right to the detriment of the efficiency of the 
tire department. 

At Monday's meeting of the Board of Fire 
Commissioners the contract for furnishing the 
department with a second -size motor-driven 
tire engine was awarded to the American La 
France Fire Engine Company, at a combined 
cost of $10,931, that company having sub- 
mitted the only bid for that type of appa- 
ratus. Commissioner Dillon strongly opposed 
awarding the contract where there was only 
one bid and voted "no." Commissioner 
Brandenstein was thoroughly in accord with 
Commissioner Dillon and explained his vote 
by stating that it was an urgent case of fire 
protection in the outlying district of the city 
where a fire station was awaiting equipment 
for some time; and, as only one bid had been 
submitted, he felt in duty bound to vote "yes," 
under the circumstances. 



Portland (Ore.) Fire News. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

Patrick Keegan. chauffeur for Battalion 
Chief Young, is a married man and has been 
since Saturday evening, when he and Miss 
Katherine Keoter of 380 Pettygrove street 
were wedded by Father McDevitt. Pat tried 
to keep it a secret, but those things always 
leak out somehow. A honeymoon trip to Los 
Angeles will be next on the program. Pat is 
one of the most popular young men in the de- 
partment and the boys all wish himgood luck. 

The bi-annual election of the firemen's re- 
presentative to the Board of Pension Control 
is to be held Monday ihe 14th. The only can- 
didates in the field at present are Lieut. R. 
G. Montague of truck 1 and Battalion Chief 
Jay Stevens. From present indications the 
election will be very close, as both candidates 
are very popular. 

The installation of the new truck is only a 
matter of training the men to operate it satis- 
factorily, and Driver Harmand who drives 
the three big bays hopes it will take quite a 
while, as it may mean the separating of him 
and the finest team in the service. Bob, Bid 
and Baldy are exceptionally well matched in 
color and size, and they are the typical fire 
horses to perfection. Bill and his famous 
team have a reputation for quick hitching and 
getting away from the house, and Bill claims 
no three-horse team in town can pass him, 
and very few two-horse ones. They average 
1500 pounds each. Baldy is 21 years old now 
and has made 2500 runs in the eight years 



Bill has drove him, never missing an alarm 
since he went in service. 

A length of the new hose which was pur- 
chased some six months ago burst at the fire 
in the East Side planing mill Thursday even- 
ing. This makes the secona length of new 
hose to let go in the past month. The boys 
had the planing mill fire nearly under conlrol 
when the hose burst and a street car cut 
another length in two which handicapped 
them, and before new lengths could be put 
in the fire got away and caused $35,000 dam- 
age. An investigation is under way, being 
conducted by Chief Dowell and Mayor Albee. 

The City Council of Forest Grove, Oregon, 
has ordered the immediate installation of an 
electric fire alarm system, similar to that, now 
in use in Corvallis. There has been no ade- 
quate wav of transmitting an alaim at night. 

The. department's band held their picnic 
Sunday, the 13th, at Estacada, and it was a 
great success. The boys had a fine day and a 
very large crowd attended. The volunteer 
departments from Lents, Gresham, St. Johns 
and Milwaukee attended; each had their 
private cars, which were sent direct to the 
towns for the firemen and their families by 
the band. 

Seattle. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

About the only matter of general interest 
on at present is the truck contract case. 
During the Gill administration, a fellow named 
Mix found pretty nearl> a sure way to sell 
apparatus and hose to the city by bidding just 
under the standard makes. The Board here 
was always strongly inclined to save trouble 
for themselves (but not for the city) by 
awarding to the lowest bidder. Mix would 
get somebody's hose or apparatus to bid on — 
stuff that was probably 10 to 20 per cent be- 
low the standards elsewhere in bids— and then 
come in just under the others No attention 
would have been paid to him, but he is a 
special friend of the editor of the Times, 
who was the power behind the Gill adminis- 
tration, and still attacks and malign's anyone 
who differs with him. Mostly because of the 
general fear of the Times, Mix has sold 
$33,000 worth of apparatus and hose to this 
city in three years— and by no means the best. 
This time both Board and chief got tired of 
being worked that way and gave the three 
motor trucks to the Seagrave, whose bid in 
the aggregate was only $125 higher than it 
would have cost them to buy of Mix. Since 
then he has attacked them in the newspapers 
and courts, is scheming to remove Stetson 
and spreads all kinds of reports about him. 

Captain Ellenberg of truck 1 has been act- 
ing battalion chief during Battalion Chief 
Britt's illness. 



ROSENBLUMABRAHAM CO. Inc. 

TAILORS FOR MEN 

HOS MARKET ST. 

ODD FELLOWS BUILDING 

Phone M.rkel 1503 

UNIFORMS OUR SPECIALTY UNION LABEL USED 



PACIFIC F1KEMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
July 18, we take the following excerpts from 
the Administrative Commit tee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From S. H. Simons, stoker engine 37, re- 
questing that he be granted a leave of absence 
for fifteen days, with permission to leave the 
city, on occount of sickness, commencing Juh 
16. Granted. 

From D. H. MacDonald, truckman true! 

10, requesting that he be granted a leave of 

absence for fifteen days, without pay, villi 

i permission to lerve the city, commencing 

August 15. Granted. 

From Edward O'Neil, driver engine 45, re- 
questing that he be granted salary during 
disability, resulting from an injury to his 
knee while working at the quarters of his 
company on May 23. Allowed. 

From Charles H. Spahr, relative to l he de- 
partment being equipped wiih first aid to the 
injured outfits for use in case of emergency 
accidents. Recommend that six outfits be 
purchased at a cost not to exceed $54, the 
chief engineer to make the selection of the 
same. 

Your committee recommends that a com- 
munication be forwarded to the Civil Service 
Commission requesting that this Board be ad- 
vised as to the reason said Commission failed 
to approve the salary demand of J. L. Collins 
as captain of engine 29 for the month of 
June, 1913, and in this connection to invite 
their attention to the opinion of the City At- 
torney, wherein he holds that the fact that 
a captain is deLaiied as operator by the chief 
engineer of the department does not deprive 
him of the salary of the rank held by him. 

Lost. 

From James Muldoon, truckman truck 12. 
tendering his resignation as a member of the 
department. Accepted. 

From the chief engineer, submitting a list 
of vacancies in different positions in the de- 
partmeiii al the present time that should be 
filled. Recommend thai requisitions he made 
on i he Civil Service Commission for eligibies 
for appointmenl to these positions. Laid 
over tu next week. 

From i lie chief engineer, recommending 
that the application of Frank L Smith for a 
transfer from lieutenant engine 'I to lieuten- 
ant engine 4 be granted, to take effect from 
the Itli h in i. So ordered. 

Kr 'Mi the Chiel of Police, requesting that 
Captain Sewell of engine3U be detailed to act 
as official photographer in thai department 
from Jul j, 17 to 31, during the nlmi nee of the 
regular photographer on his annual vacation. 
Granted. 

From B utaliou Chief Con Ion, submitting a 
Complaint against John Daly, truck m»n trial. 
6. for assaulting :i conductor of the United 
Railroads and with u-ing offensive language 
to him on June 21. Suspended for live days, 
the time during which he was under BUS 
pension. 

From I. Gurmendez, acting captain water 
tower 1, submitting a complaint against 



Frank Bell, driver water tower 1, for absent- 
ing himself from duty without permission on 
July 15. After an investigation of this mat- 
ter your committee recommend that Bell he 
not allowed salary for the time absent from 
duty without permission. 



Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

From the Pacific Motor Fire Apparatus 
Company, requesting that a date he set for 
making the required test of the Webb chemi- 
cal fire engine. Set for Monday, 3 p. m. 

Consideration of bids for furnishing one or 
more gasoline motor tractors. Put over. 

From the Civil Service Commission, sub- 
mitting the names of 1 hos. R. V. Kragen, 
Timothy J. Collins, Frank Carew and Edw. 
M O'Donnell for appointment as temporary 
firemen to serve as substitutes. Appointed. 

Resolution requesting the Civil Service 
Commission to authorize temporary appoint- 
ments for the month of August, where there 
are no Civil Service eligibies available. 
Approved. 

Trial of Bernard A. Davis, watchman at 
the corporation yard, for failing to report for 
duty on July 2. Sixty days' suspension. 



Truck 8's Defy to Truck 2. 

Inspired by the success and the interest 
and enthusiasm manifested by the fire laddies 
and their adherents on the West Side, and the 
keen and no less friendly rivalry existing be- 
tween the two North Beach teams, the boys 
from the South Side have formed and will put 
into the field, literally tossing their helmets 
into the arena as it were, an aggregation of 
balltossers, calculated to give any of the de- 
partment nines a stiff argument, and who will 
endeavor to lift the laurels of the victors and 
the supremacy of the department from the 
Northern teams. 

With that intent and purpose in view, the 
laddies from the South Side have issued a 
defy, thrown down the gauntlet to the North- 
erners and forwarded a challenge. The boys 
from truck 2 have gallantly accepted said 
challenge and will try conclusions, also cross 
bats with the South Siders in mortal combat 
I not dead I j | on i he field of baseballdom on the 
23rd 'day of this month at I tie Seventh and 
Harrison street Playgrounds. 

It mighl be mentioned thai the Southern 
team i- composed of members ol companies 
embracing thai section known as the First 
Dynamite < torps, giving the team a distinct 
southern character, or complexion, or flavor, 
as you choose, and the management writeB all 
the fans, and others who are not fans, to- 
gether with the fanettea to be present and 
assist in encouraging and rooting for their 
favorite Soul herm i 

Chief Boden has gracefully consented to 
toss tin' first ball over the plate at lit a. m. 

sharp, thereby prectpital ing the advent of the 

Southerners into the realm of the depart- 
mental baseball fraternity, and upon the in- 
troductory "Flay Ball" of t he < ftieial arbiter 
the teams will immediately respond in the 



following order: 

Truck 8 Truck 2 

Buckley Center Field Valente 

Dubbs Right Field Derham 

Volke Third Base McKenna 

Dougherty Left Field Lavaroni 

Leichsenrang.... Second Base Dubbs 

McDevitt First Base Reidy 

O'Donnell Short Stop Hackett 

Moholy Catcher Lavin 

Collett Pitcher Morgan 



John Tehel, purchasing agent of the Ameri- 
can-La France Fire Engine Company, was a 
visitor at the meeting of the Fire Commission 
last Monday night. 

Secretary Kennedy of the Fire Commission, 
with a few friends, will leave Monday on a 
hunting outing in Mendocino county. They 
expect to be gone a week or ten days. 

Captain Bulger, Moholy and Billy Brown 
with two steamers, we understand, did some 
effective work during the Mt. Tamalpias fire. 
The residents, who had been fighting the 
flames day and night, as soon as they saw the 
apparatus went to bed, stating they felt safe. 

After six years' experience in handling tire- 
men's shirts, I have secured the best tailor- 
made shuts ever sold on the Pacific Coast. 
Every shirt is guaranteed. Customers who 
have dealt with me know that I never mis- 
represent. New customers will not be dis- 
appointed in these shirts. L. Riznik.— Advt. 

The boys of engine company 4 are good 
gardeners as well as firefighters, and are said 
to be one happy family. They have a plot in 
the rear of quarters in which potatoes, let- 
tuce, onions, cabbage, etc., are showing 
signs of a bountiful crop. Captain Kehoe 
stated to the editor that if Lieut. Smith is a 
good boy he'll allow him to pull weeds and 
take part in hilling up the potatoes. 

At this writing (Wednesday), Battalion 
Chief Britt, who was partially asphyxiated 
last week from inhaling fumes of nitric acid 
while fighting a fire in a Fourth street drug 
store, is getting along nicely at St. Joseph* 8 
Hospital. Mrs. Britt has been in daily atten- 
dance at his bedside and expects to take him 
home in the course of a few days. He is the 
recipient of many visits from friends daily, 
who hope for his speedy recovery. 

Lieut. Geo. H. Thomas of engine 25 is act- 
ing captain of engine COmpanj 17, ill the 
absence of Captain Ward, who met with a 
serious and painful accident recentlj bj be- 
ing thrown (rem his hose wagon, breaking 
In.- arm. Lieut. Thomas was one ot the first 
n i en i he is of the department, whi n treasur* t 
of engine com| an\ 34, over five years Bgo, t6 
hand the writer $2.00 for a subscription to 
the PA< IFIC I' li:t man. He has been a in. in- 
ber ot the depart menl many \ eat . and has 
taken an active pan in many hard battles 

with t h' til e demon. 



Telephone DoubIu 1255 

L. J. FtOPCKT, THE TAILOR 

MAKES A SPF.CIAI TY OF 

PIRKMH\'S '. ' UINIPOKIVUS 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



American -La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



u 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



BROWN & KENNEDY LOTS $150 

FLORAL 



$150 LOTS 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given tf> Wedding o/nd F\tneral Orders, 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Rrach NtiRSEuiEs, take Castro street car to 23rd, or 

Mission. 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 21th streets. 





112 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 



717 K Street 
Sacramento 



EAGLESON & CO. 



!mpurle>! and Manilla, 



MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

I I 18 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 



A 
R 

T 

I 
s 

T 

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p. > HomeM 1615 

Phones, Market 5725 

FUNERAL WORK A SPECIALTY 

LOWfST PRICKS 

3091 SIXTEENTH STREET 

NEAR VALENCIA 
UNION STORE SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Doujla, 2871 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKHRS 



EASY TERMS 



= IIN = 



Ph„„. Ma-kel 5417 



SIN FRANCISCO 



Phone Dousla. 4716 



Home C 2458 



LAMANETBROS 

HATS. UNDERWEAR. ETC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



"77 PI-HMD SI'REKT 

SAN FRANCISCO 

WM. F. ECG.AN 

M. R. C. V. S- 

VKTKRINARY SURGEON TO S. f. p. 1). 



1155 OOI.OEN GATE AVE. 
lYkuhones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cat 1444 San Pablo Ave., 



Marine View Terrace 

(THE PIEDMONT OF RICHMOND) 
DON'T 

let this opportunity pass b,. This is absolutely 
youi last chance to get close in ptopeity at such 
prices and terms. 

Only seven minutes walk from the 
City Hall. Ashland Avenue will reach 
Marine View Terrace through therriLinciLal 
tunnel and continue on through the entre length 
of the property to the new ferty (t cm v. hich boats 
will run regularly to and from -an Francisco. 

Bonds have been sold and the money is 

now in the hands of the City Treasurer for the 
immediate construction of these ;mj-roverren(s 
and values will double and treble in a veiy 
short time. 

Don't delay— buy now instead of 
wishing you had later on. 

For maps or further information, see or write 

WENHAM & PAUL 



Oakland, California 




VOL. X.-NO. 36 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Fireman's Splendid Feat. 

Firemen who had climbed with sev- 
eral lines of hose into the rear of the 
fourth floor of the ten-story building 
at 121-125 West Seventeenth street. 
New York, on June 23, were unable to 
get to the flames because of the dense 
smoke. Six men who attempted to 
run through the smoke to break the 
front windows and let in air were 
overcome and were dragged back to 
safety. In the meantime the fire 
spread, and the firemen's escape was 
threatened. 

"We must get a front window open," 
shouted Acting Deputy Chief Charles 
Ross, who was in charge of the fire- 
men. "Frank Costello, you run down 
to the third floor, climb out on the sill 
of a window and smash one of those 
windows with your pole." 

Costello went to the floor below with 
two other firemen. Heclimbed out on 
the window ledge and struck with his 
pole at one of the fourth-story win- 
dows. The blow fell short, as the pole 
lacked two feet of reaching the win- 
dow above. 

Costello then called to his two com- 
panions to lift, him by his legs so that 
he could break the glass. The two 
men leaned far out of the window on 
either side of the sill. Each seized 
one of Costello's legs and lifted him 
slowly up, while Costello steadied him- 
self with one hand against the wall of 
the building. He held the pole in 
readiness with the other. Hundreds 
of persons on the sidewalk looked on 
agape at the fireman's daring. 

When Costello had been hoisted up 
the necessary distance he swung his 
p )le, s Hashing the window above him. 



Then he dived headforemost into the 
window on the third floor in time to 
escape the falling glass. A great 
volume of smoke poured out of the 
hole in the glass above, and in a few 
seconds the firemen on the fourth 
floor could see to throw their streams 
of water on the flames. Acting De- 
puty Chief Ross, who saw Costello's 
feat, said: 

"It was one of the best pieces of 
work that I have seen in twenty-five 
years' experience as a fireman." 

The fire was in a loft occupied by 
August C. Merle & Co., manufactur- 
ers of children's clothing. A short 
time before the fire was discovered 
the large number of girls and women 
employed in the building quit work 
for the day. — Fireman's Herald. 

Nebraska Fire Department Strikes. 

By a vote of 31 to 15 the Norfolk. 
Neb., Volunteer Fire Department, at 
a special meeting decided to sus- 
pend all fire fighting under the 
present fire driver with whom they are 
dissatisfied and whom they declare the 
City Council would not remove. The 
action of the department, it was de- 
clared at the meeting, means that 
Norfolk has no fire department. A 
committee of four firemen, one from 
each of the four eampanies. notified 
Mayor Verges of the action taken by 
the department immediately aftei the 
meeting was adjourm d. It is believed 
that the mayor will take the matter up 
with the City Council immediately. 

Some officials believe that the entire 
department will be disbanded. The 
appointment of the driver caused dis- 
satisfaction from the beginning. 



An Impressive Scene. 

From the Fireman's Herald of June 
28, in its account of the death of four 
Montreal firemen while fighting a fire 
in Fabien Lane of that city, June 22, 
we take the following extracts: 

The smoke was so dense at the point 
where the four lives were lost that it 
was some time before the others 
learned of the tragedy. The first inkl- 
ing was when Captain Enlow, who 
was one of those who were near at 
hand, so near that he had both hands 
burned quite badly, exclaimed to a 
group of hook and ladder men, "Some 
of the boys are under the wall." 

It was impossible to do anything 
then, but later a concerted rush for 
the spot was made, the men worked 
towards the debris like demons, while 
others played streams of water on 
them and the mass of stuff they were 
overhauling. 

In a few moments the head and 
shoulders of the first body were un- 
covered with the face badly burned. 
Clapsed tight in his hands was the 
nozzle he had been directing when the 
wall fell on him. 

His comrades lifted him in their 
arms, and with the nozzle still clasped 
tightly to his breast, they carried him 

with three others to the improved 

morgue in the office of the Cit] Ice 

Company on St. Cum gonde strei t. 

It was a most imposing sight to see 
every fireman standing with b;.i<d 
head, as the litt U* procession filed i BBt 
with their burden. A hush fell on 
the spectators, and there was not a 
covered head among them. Similar 
scenes were enacted as the Indies >'l 
the other three were uncovi red. 

An imposing civic funeral were 
given the four firemen on June 25. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Fifty Perish in Flames. 

Fifty women and girls are known to 
have perished in the flames in the de- 
struction of Freeman's overall factory, 
Binghamton, N. Y., Tuesday. In their 
mad struggle to reach the street on 
the overcrowded fire escapes scores 
were injured, many of them fatally, 
by leaping from the top floor as the 
fire drove them out. Immediately 
after the fire started, the factory in a 
few minutes was a roaring furnace, 
and the members of the Binghampton 
fire department were unable to get 
near enough with a hose to have any 
effect in checking the flames. 

When the firemen arrived they were 
unable to get within 200 feet of the 
building and the streams from their 
hose were turned into steam without 
effect upon the fire. Life nets and 
extension ladders were useless. There 
was no chance for those caught on the 
upper floors except to jump, and this 
many took, while others fell, crum- 
pled with the heat. 

The fire seemed to burst from every 
part of the building at once. Girls 
and women were clustered on the iron 
ladders. But the flames were too 
quick for them. 

The first puff of flame was hardly 
discerned before the fire leaped along 
the staircases and walls, up the eleva- 
tor shaft, along the floors and ceiling. 
Front and rear the flames belched 
forth, clear across Wall street, on 
which the building fronted, withering 
the shade trees on the river bank and 
scorching the building across an alley 
at the rear. 

Fire drills had been carried on so 
frequently of late that the employes 
began a leisurely march to the exits 
when the alarm sounded. The fire 
department was delayed by an alarm 
turned in a quarter of a mile from 
the fire. 



Firemen are so thinned out by death 
that there are not enough of them left 
to raise the necessary $150 to pay for 
the water with which to keep green 
the graves in which many of the old 
veterans of the early days of the de- 
partment sleep. 

"It is a shame to neglect the graves 
of the men who made this fire depart- 
ment what it is," said Maxwell. "If 
the members of the Mutual Associa- 
tion would only contribute 25 cents 
each there would be enough to pay the 
expense." 

Chief Maxwell paid the money him- 
self and stated that he would bring 
the matter to the attention of the 
Mutual Aid Association in the mean- 
time. 



A Stockton dispatch of July 21 says 
Stockton's "firebug" was busy again 
Sunday night. This time a $2000 barn 
belonging to Frank S. Boggs was 
destroyed. Neighbors have given a 
description of a stranger seen about 
the place early in the evenirg. The 
fire brings the total "firebug" loss in 
that city in the last week to $170,000. 

The Seagrave Fire Apparatus Com- 
pany of Columbus. Ohio, is rot in any 
trust or combination. 



Bad News for "Shorties."' 



Firemen's Plot in Laurel Hill Cemetery. 

Lrtst week First Asst. Chief John R. 
Ma^wall received a letter from the 
Laurel Hill Cemetery Association stat- 
ing that owing to fundsnot forthcom- 
ing the graves in the fireman's plot 
were being neglected, and that the 
watering of the graves must be 
discontinued. 

That the ranks of the old Exempt 



Under the above caption the Fire- 
man's Herald of recent date editorially 
says: 

Out of Boston comes the report that 
the mayor will not permit men to be- 
come firemen who are less than five 
feet and seven inches tall or weighs 
less than one huhdred and forty 
pounds. The City Council had fixed 
the requirements at one hundred and 
thirty- five pounds and five feet six 
inches. 

It seems too bad that one inch and 
five pounds should stand between a 
man, otherwise qualified, and entrance 
into a fire department. But in most 
fire departments the length and 
weight, favored by Boston's mayor are 
demanded, and in some instances even 
more. 

There are, however, in the Ameri- 
can fire service a large number of men 
whose physique does notconfoim to 
any standard ever approved by gym- 
nasium directors, and yet they make 
good firemen and their officeis would 
not part with them for all the perfect- 
ly proportioned Apollos in creation. 

Nevertheless you canr.ot lave civil 
service without rules and in this mat- 
ter of height and weight you must 
stop somewhere — a = the recoi d-holder 
said when he threw down his fork 
after his fifty-fourth pie. 

The first motorcycle used in the Sac- 
ramento Fire Department hps given 
such good saiisfaction that the de- 
partment contemplates the purchase 
of several additional machines. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



FOR the man in any fine who plans to achieve, who ex- 
pects to win high place in his chosen calling, there 
coold be no better investment ih&n a HOWARD 
Watch. Living with a HOWARD is the surest way to 
absorb the accuracy, the pur duality, and practical time- 
saving that America's successful men demand as a mat- 
ter of course. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attached — from the 
17-jewel 'double roller) in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at $40. to the 23- 
Jewel at $150— and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. 

Admiral Sfgsbee has written a little I 

"The Log nf the Howard Watch." giving the 
record of his own Howard in the U, S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept. N. 
and we'll send you a copy. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS, Boston. Mass 



T. H. KILQO 

DIAMONDS A.IND JEWELRY 



71 WALLER ST.. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIK Proprielor 

The BEST TAILOR-MADE FIREMEN'S SHIRTS 

OUR SPECIALTY 

2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Cornet Broderick 
Ttl.pl.on* Wen 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Ai/ent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



The Dr. John Tripp Rtmtdy 

POSITIVELY CURK* 

Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh. Rheumatism, 
Cancer, Goitre, Tumorous Growths, Malaria, 
Erysipelas, Scrofula, Lupus, Salt Rheum, Ne- 
crosis, Kidney Diseases. Enlarged Glands and 
Joints aod all i.lood Diseases. 

479 TURK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

"Mrs. Dot." the Alcazar's offering 
next Monday night and throughout 
the week, will be another well-fitting 
vehicle for Bessie Barriscale, Forrest 
Stanley, Howard Hickman and the re- 
gular company. Written by W. So- 
merset Maugham, the British play- 
wright, it served Billie Burke as a 
starring medium during a season in 
New York and a year on tour, and this 
will be its first presentation at popular 
prices. Miss Barriscale's talents are 
admirably adapted to effective por- 
trayal of the central figure in "Mrs. 
Dot." She has the role of the youth- 
ful, pretty and vivacious widow of an 
opulent London brewer, and when she 
finds that Gerald Halstone, a poor 
young fellow who has won her affec- 
tion, is engaged to marry a girl un- 
worthy of him she neither mopes nor 
seeks distraction, but systematically 
plans to win him for herself. How 
she manages to succeed without con- 
veying dissatisfaction to anyone con- 
cerned makes delicious comedy. Mr. 
Stanley will be seen as Gerald, Mr. 
Hickman as the widow's cynical ac- 
complice, Jerome Storm as the youth 
she utalizes to transfer Nellie's loval- 
ty, Bart Wesner as Gerald's valet, 
Alice Patek as Nellie, Adele Belgarde 
as her mother and Anna McNaughton 
as "Dot's" maiden aunt. 

Empress Theatre. 

"The Cavaliers," a magnificent 
scenic and musical production and 
"The Passenger Wreck" will be joint 
headline attractions at the Empress 
Theatre Sunday afternoon on a varied 
and costly bill. "The Cavaliers" is 
one of the most novel and unique 
musical attractions in vaudeville. The 
management assures a rollicking offer- 
ingin "The Passenger Wreck, "where- 
in comedy and tragedy have a large 
place, with comedy slightly over- 
wishing the tragic portion of the act. 
Three sturdy athletic girls, the Three 
Bennett Sisters, give an exhibition of 
physical culture exercises. A swagger 
set of soloists will be seen when the 
Palace Quartette make their appear- 
ance. Joe Birnes, the poetic story 
teller of character songs and dialect 
Stories, will be a popular favorite. 
The Georgia Trio will offer some amus- 
ing chatter and Florence Bowes, a 
singing comedienne, complete the bill. 



Gorham Motor-Propelled Pumping Engines 

SOLD IN CALIFORNIA 




TYPE OF STRAIGHT PUMPING ENGINE 



1 Oakland . 

2 Pasadena 

3 San Diego 

4 Los Angeles 

5 Los Angeles 

6 Los Angeles 

7 San Diego 

8 San Diego 



I Straight Pump 
Combination Hose & Pump 



9 San Diego I Combination Hose & Pump 

10 Visalia . I " 

I I Bakersfield I " 

1 2 Los Angeles I 

I 3 Los Angeles ... I Straight Pump 

1 4 Los Angeles I Combination Hose & Pump 

1 5 Sacramento I 



Note. — There are more Gorham Motor Propelled Pumping Engines sold and in service in 
the State of California than all other makes combined 

There is a reason. He" MERIT TELLS. ASK THE CITY THAT OWNS ONE 

Gorham Fire Apparatus Company 



SEATTLE 
82 & 84 W. Marion Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Steeet 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 South Olive Street 



When You're BuyirT Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 





good oil, say 



PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Sole Distributor for the l»nclflc Const 54.1 Onlden Oalc Ave., San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 







PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2.00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 

continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1 90s. J.t (he 
Postoflice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act "f Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



The conference of the Fire and Civil Ser- 
vice Commissions with Mayor Rolph, which 
was to have taken place last Wednesday 
night, was put over to next Tuesday evening. 

An interesting letter from our Oakland 
correspondent, containing a vast amount of 
news of interest of various departments across 
the bay, having arrived too late for publica- 
tion in this issue, will appear next week. 

Former Efficiency Expert E. R. Zion, now 
in the Civil Service Departmeut, is planning 
for making all city employes independent of 
their superiors and dependent for promotion 
on the actual work they perform. He pro- 
poses to keep a record showing every em- 
ploye's actual output of work, so that when 
promotions are to be made, the fittest can be 
chosen by the Civil Service Commission. 

As the firemen of Seattle now enjoy all the 
benefits of the two-platoon system, with its 
daily 12 hours of leave off, it is more than 
doubtful if they will he allowed to take their 
15 days' vacation, to which they were enti- 
tled under the old system, when they had 12 
hours off every fourth day or 24 hours off 
each eighth day. The matter is all in the 
hands of Chief Stetson, who insists that be- 
fore vacations are allowed some provision 
must be made by the council to pay the sala- 
ries of the necessary substitutes. 

The Civil Service examinations to the rank 
of assistant engineers in the fire department 
was begun Wednesday afternoon. The ex- 
aminations took place without the physical 
test. Wednesday the applicants were ex- 
amined as to their knowledge of fire preven- 
tion, etc. On Thursday afternoon they were 
examined on fire fighting, laws and ordinances 
relating to fires and fire department rules and 
inspection. Friday, written reports on sub- 
jects were given by the commission which 
completed the examinations. The names of 
the eleven battalion chiefs who took the ex- 
aminations are as follows: John J. Conlon, 
James Radford, Thomas J. Murphy, Charles 
R. Murray, Stephen D. Russell, James P. 
Britt, James F. Lay den, John R. Maxwell, 
Michael Boden, Walter A. Cook and George 
G. Bailey. 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
July 25, we take the following excerpts from 
the Administrative Committee's report, which 
was approved by the Board: 

From the Civil Service Commission, sub- 
mitting a copy of rule adopted by that com- 
mission relative to vacations and emergency 
leave of absence, and prescribing conditions 
to he complied with in connection therewith. 
Recommend that the City Attorney be re- 
quested to furnish an opinion as to whether 
Ordinance No. 2297 (New Series) under which 
this rule was adopted would apply to other 
than the employes of this depariment who 
are not regular members thereof. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the following applications for transfers 
be granted, to take effect August 1st: J. T. 
Lahey, from lieutenant engine 18 to lieuten- 
ant relief engine 1; M. J. O'Connell, from 
lieutenant relief engine 1 to lieutenant engine 
18. Approved. 

From John T. Laliev, lieutenant engine 18, 
submitting a waiver of all pension rights in 
the department in view of the fact of having 
been granted a leave of absence from the de- 
partment without pay for one year from July 
14, 1913. Filed. 

From J. J. Flood, hoseman engine 24, re- 
questing that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence, without pay, for a period of one month, 
commencing August 2, with permission to 
leave the city, on account of sickness. 
Granted; 

From Acting Battalion Chief Ellenberger. 
reporting the receipt of a check for twenty- 
five dollars from R. A. Crothers of the Bulletin, 
' to be distributed amongst the members of 
truck 1, in appreciation of the services ren- 
1 dered by that company at a recent fire at the 
Bulletin building, and requesting permission 
of the Board to divide this sum in equal pro- 
portions amonst said members. Granted. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the Civil Service Commission be re- 
quested to certify one engineer, five truck- 
men and two hosemen from its eligible lists 
for appointment in this department. Ap- 
proved and so ordered. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the Board of Public Works be requested 
to take immediate steps in the matter of 
having plans and specifications prepared for 
the construction of buildings for engines 12 
and 48 Approved. 

From the Industrial Accident Board of the 
State of California, requesting certain data 
concerning a recent aecident to Frederick 
Isbell of engine 34. Recommend that Secre- 
tary be directed to reply that this department 
has no record on file as to any such accident 
having occurred. 

From Martin E. Wormuth, hoseman engine 
38, requesting that he be allowed salary dur- 
ing disability, resulting from a fractured 
wrist, received while off duty on his annual 
vacation. Recommend be denied, as Wor- 
muth was not on duty atthe time and did not 
receive said injury in the performance of duty 
in the department. 



From Wm. Bullier, hoseman engine 19, re- 
questing that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for21days, with pay, commencing July 
24, with permission to leave the city, on ac- 
count of sickness. Granted. 

From the chief engineer, submitting re- 
ports on the following named probationary 
members whose probationary terms will ex- 
pire on August 1, 1913: J J. M< Grath, P. T. 
Joiner, James McDevitt, T. F. Lynch, horse- 
shoers; J. J. McGlennon, E. B. Williams, 
Daniel Dewar, blacksmiths; J. F. Coughlin, 
Richard A. Cole, blacksmith helpers; Charles 
Bradley. J V. Doherty, carriage painters; J. 
J. Kane, G W. Harris, boilermakers; E. C. 
Laws, D. A. Ahern, harnessmakers; Thomas 
Gunderson, M. C. Johnson, pilots fireboat 1; 
T. F. Carrick. T J. Daly, engineers; Leo 
Strand, Hugh Ruurke, W. F. Hogan, fire- 
men flrehobt 1; .1. G. Trapp, William Olseii. 
pilots; Jrmes Ward, T. D. Thompson, engi- 
neers and Patrick Cushley, Patrick Minehan, 
Thos. F. Dolan firemen fireboat 2; Michael 
Condon, engineer; Andrew Kennedy, W. J. 
Tallant, firemen fireboat 3; Robert P. John- 
son and Jas. Lowe, engineers fireboat 4. Re- 
commend that the above named be perma- 
nently appointed in the department, to take 
effect from August 1, 1913, Ihey having been 
favorably reported upon and vouched for by 
the officers of the cepartment under whose 
charge they have been performing their re- 
quired duties. 



Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows: 

From the chief engineer, requesting that 
permission be granted to organize an associa- 
tion amongst the members of the department 
for the purpose of tending to the up-keep 
of the plot of the Exempt foremen's Associa- 
tion and the graves of departed members. 
Granted. 

From the chief engineer, relative to new 
positions for the high pressure water system. 
Approved. 

From the chief engineer, submitting a list 
of apparatus and hose to be purchased during 
the present fiscal year. Laid over. 

From the Superintendent of Horses, recom- 
mending the purchase of nine draught and 
three buggy horses. Recommend same be 
purchased. 

Resolution relative to the non-payment of 
salaries to per diem employes. Laid over. 

Capt. Brown of engine 39 is sojourning at 
Camp Meeker. 

Captain Mitchell of chemical 2 was acting 
for Second Assistant Engineer Layrien Wed- 
nesday. Captain Mitchell is one of the most 
painstaking and conscientious members of 
the department. 






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Portland (Ore.) Fire News. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

The result of the election held July 14th, to 
elect a member of the Board of Pension Con- 
trol to represent the firemen was as follows: 
Chief Stevens, 193 votes, Lieut. Montague of 
truck 1, 129 votes; four other candidates had 
one vote each. Chief Stevens is very popular 
with the men, having been in the service con- 
tinuously since 1904. He has advanced from 
the ranks to the position of battalion chief, 
which position he has held for five years. 

Walter J. Powell, one of the charter mem- 
bers of engine 5 of the volunteer fire dapart- 
ment, died at his home in Stafford. Ore , of 
heart failure. Mr. Stafford was 59 years old 
and is survived by his wife and three sisters. 
Robert Holman, a former chief of the vol- 
unteer fire department, was stricken with 
appoplexy at the home of his brother, Edward 
Holman, 220 Third street. Mr. Holman is 74 
years old. His condition is considered very 
serious. 

Chief Dowell has received permission from 
tilt Mayor to place the fire bell in front of the 
fire department's offices in the southeastern 
wing of the city hall. 

One of the hardest fought and best handled 
fires which has occured in Portland in some 
time past broke out in ihe paint store and 
warehouse of the Fisher -Thomson Paint 
Company Thursday night the 17th, at 10:04 
p. m. That the entire building was not 
burned down does credit to the hard work of 
the hoys and the fine way in which the third 
alarm was turned in and the excellent super- 
vision of the officers in charge of the fire. 
The new fireboat received its baptism of 
smoke and fire and did splendid work. The 
loss was about $45,000, fully insured. 

Considerable activity is apparent at the 
offices of the State Forester. Some six hun- 
dred rangers have been hired ; signs put up 
through the forests; roads repaired and look- 
out stations erected, and telephone wires put 
in first-class order. Every effort has been 
m ide to cut the fire loss to the lowest point. 
A new apparai us, consisting of a single- 
cylinder, hopper- type, Fairbanks-Morse gas 
engine, connected to a rotary impellar pump, 
engine, pump, suction and 500 feet of hose 
weighing 350 pounds, is to be packed on mules 
to the scenes of tires in the forests. Water 
is to be taken from the many creeks and 
springs. 

Pinal arrangements have been made for the 
concert that is to he given by the tire and 
police departments' bands. The concert is to 
be held in the Armory on the evening of Au- 
gust 17. at 8 p. m 

Sandy. Oregon, has received its two chemi- 
cal engines. Tbej will be given a trial be 
fore they are accepted. 

Seattle. 

ISii.iiiil Curre.H(M>ml«'nco. ] 

One hundred and twenty live "day shift" 
fire n at Seattle were called (Hit on police 

duty l>y the Mayor, Saturday evening, July 
lit. This was in consequence of the incipient 
riot the night before, when several hundred 



soldiers, sailors, citizens and boys raided two 
I. W. W. rooms and two quarters of the 
Socialists, piled the contents in the streets 
and burned them. The temporary policemen 
found little to do and were dismissed shortly 
after midnight. During the raids on the 
I. W. W. rooms, hose companies 2 and 10 and 
chemical 1 had some exciting experiences, 
but met with no opposition from the attack- 
ing parties. There is no truth in the pub- 
lished stories that they followed the parties 
around, hut when called they were somewhat 
delayed hv crowds on the street, and the piles 
of papers and furniture were practically de- 
stroyed before the fires were put out. 

On Monday, July 21, the second injunction 
case at Seattle against the Seagrave agents 
and the city was decided in favor of the latter. 
The decision in the first hearing was precisely 
the same. It will be remembered that the 
Seattle Board of Public Works had awarded 
a contract for one aerial and two city trucks, 
all motor. The price of these was $125 higher 
than it would have been had the two city 
trucks been ordered of another bidder. The 
latter brought the two injunction suits and 
now threatens to carry the matter to the 
State Supreme Court. 

An Alarm Which Locates the Fire. 



According to Popular Mechanics, a fire 
alarm box which indicates the floor on which 
the fire is located, and also in what part, de- 
signed particularly for factory buildings in 
which a large number of women are employed, 
has been brought out by an inventor in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

Boxes are placed on each floor. In case of 
fire the alarm is sounded by pushing the but- 
ton indicating the part of the floor where it 
has started. If the fire is at the east end, for 
instance, thebutton marked "east" is pushed. 
This sets off an alarm bell on all the boxes in 
the building and illuminates a number and 
letter to indicate the fire's position. 

If, for example, the fire is near the center 
of the third floor, "3C" will be illuminated on 
every box. 

This tells every person in the building the 
location of the fire and enables them to de- 
termine the safest way to take to reach a 
place of safety. 

New Excuse Is a Good One. 

Traditions were shattered at New York fire 
headquarters recently, says an exchange, 
when two firemen charged with being absent 
from quarters without leave startled Deputv 
Fire Commissioner Olvany with a new excuse 
The novelty of hearing something besides 
forgetting a change of tour, oversleeping at 
home and dropping otf into a nap on an "L" 
train appeared to appeal to the Deputy Com- 
missioner and the men got otf with a loss of 
one day's pay. 

The surprise came when Fireman John R. 
Sauerberry and George L. BontZ, of Hook and 
Ladder Co. 20, in Wooster street, came up 
before him. They were charged by Captain 
McGrath with having been absent without 
leave for one hour and fifty-one minutes. 



Sauerberry says that friends of his went to his 
quarters feeling "pretty gay." They were 
strangers to the place and he was afraid they 
would get lost if they tried to find the Grand 
Central Station all by themselves, so he piloted 
them there. Bontz said he had friends in a 
similar plight. 

"Next time put your friends on a street 
car and let them take a chance, " remarked 
Deputy Olvany, as he fined them each a 
day's pay. 

Pacific Coast Fire Chiefs' Convention. 

Those going to the twenty-first annual con- 
vention of the Pacific Coast Association of 
Fire Chiefs in Tacoma, Wash.. August 25 28 
inclusive, over the lines of the Southern Pa- 
cific Company, will buy their tickets to 
Tacoma on the receipt-certificate plan. If 
they wish to stop over, they must do so going, 
and must pay the regular stop-over fare. 

The convention secretary must certify that 
fiftv who have bought certificate tickets are 
present, and then those with such certificates 
are entitled to buy return tickets for one- 
third fare. No stop-overs will be granted on 
return. Harry W. Bringhurst, Secretary. 

We understand a nine made up of members 
of engine 6 and truck 4 will cross bats next 
Wednesday at the North Beach playgrounds. 

The result of the ball game between the 
members of truck 2 and 35 arriving too late 
for publication in this issue, will appear next 
week. 

It is rumored that Melville S Munter, the 
handsome relief operator of the fifth batta- 
lion, will soon become a benedict. Accept 
our best wishes, Melville. 

Captain Welch of engine 7, that sturdy 
veteran firefighter, has been doing duty as 
captain of truck 3 during the week in the ab- 
sence of the regular captain. 

Creed Lark of truck 3 believes that Stowe 
Lake should be moved to the Civic Center 
site. He would then have an opportunity to 
test the merits of his launch. 



The new button of the Scannell Club is 
meeting with the unqualified approval of 
every member to whom it has been shown. 
Director Mulligan has shown excellent taste 
in his selection. 

After six years' experience in handling fire- 
men's shirts, I have Becured the best tailor- 
made shirts ever sold on the Pacific Coast. 
Every shirt is guaranteed. Customers who 
have dealt with me know that 1 never mis- 
represent. New customers will not be dis- 
appointed in these shirts L Ri/.nik.- Advt, 



Telephone DourIm 1255 

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Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

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(THE PIEDMONT OF RICHMOND) 
DON'T 

'el this opportunity pass by. This is absolutely 
your last chance to get close in property at such 
prices and terms. 

Only seven minutes walk from the 
City Hall. Ashland Avenue will reach 
Marine View Terrace through the municipal 
tunnel and continue on through the entire It ngth 
of the property to the new ferry from « hich boats 
will run regularly to and from San Francisco. 

Bonds have been sold and the money is 
now in the hands of the City Treasurer for the 
immediate construction of these improveirer.il 
and values will double and treble in a very 
short time. 

Don't delay — buy now instead of 
wishing you had later on. 

For maps or further information, see or write 

WENHAM & PAUL 

1444 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, California 




VOL. X.-NO. 38 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 9, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Rules Cause Emnity. 

The following two excerpts are taken 
from the Book of Rules of the Seattle 
Fire Department: 

Rule 54 reads: 

"No member of the departmentshall 
take part in any election, whatso- 
ever, by distributing printed matter, 
electioneering in any manner or work- 
ing on election hoards, and no associa- 
tion, club or organized society of fire- 
men for the purpose of influencing 
legislation either in the state legisla- 
tureorcity council, will be permitted." 

Rule 58 reads: 

"Members must not directly or in- 
directly solicit any political influence 
or intercession with the chief to effect 
their transfer or promotion." 

Writing to the Saturday Review, a 
weekly paperdevoted to political news, 
a member of the department says: 

"Both of these rules tend to threaten 
anyone that refuses to give up all con- 
st iiutional rights, and I can't remem- 
ber promising to do anything of thai 
nature when I began my service." 

Concerning the rules of the depart- 
ment, he says: 

"It is very easy to go through the 
rules governing the department and 
one will sec that everything that is 
possible to arouse the enmity of the 
m'-Mi is there if you read between the 
I, n's; for instance, take rule 23, whiel 
stat •- that no member will be entitled 
to any additional salary for serving in 
a higher position. It looks good, but 
the injustice is visible to anyone fami- 
lial - with the department, for it thrusts 
the responsibility of a higher position 
upon the members thus detailed and 
allows him no recompense, although 



the chief is allowed the money to pa\ 
such members. 

"Rule 32 is another illustration. Il 
prohibits mem hers of the department 
from wearing uniforms when off duty. 
All members pay for their own uni- 
forms, and being that the fire depart- 
ment is a civil position, a man has not 
got to give up his civil rights and is 
entitled to wear clothes that he buys 
and pays for any time he is not on 
duty. But the men are threatened 
with dismissal, unless they drop all 
pride and civil rights. 

"Rule 33 provides that single men 
may come back and occupy extra 
beds, thus strengthening the com- 
pany at nights, but the chief had the 
extra beds removed, forcing those 
members to go to the expense of 
getting lodgings, and thereby depriv- 
ing the city of the services of a num- 
ber of firemen. It can easily be seen 
that under these rules the unnecessary 
expense is forced on the individual 
members, such as street car fare and 
theatre admission, w hich was always 
a fireman's privilege before." 

In commenting on the above the 
Review says: 

These rules and the excerpts from 
the fireman's letter are introduced 
solely for thepurposeof shewing how 
Utterly impossible it is at this tin e for 
firemen, or a large majority of them, 
to approach the chief in their own in- 
terests. Even if some of the men are 
unduly prejudiced, the fact remains 
that they are dissatisfied with this 
attitude toward them, feeling that 
the relationship between them and 
the chief should be closer, all things 
considered, than it is. Not until the 



question of vacations was agitated in 
the department and in the press did 
the chief act, and there is nothing of 
record to show that he is enthusiastic 
in their behalf in the matter. It is 
well known that the chief has not be- 
come reconciled to the double platoon, 
which was voted by the people over 
his published protest. The men take 
the position that the question could 
have been settled by the chief long 
ago. His failure to do so is responsible 
for their suspicion. It is not too late 
for the chief to act. The men are 
entitled to their vacation. 

Petaluma. 



The large bell that has hung in the 
belfry of the fire house of hook and 
ladder company 1 on Western avenue, 
ever since the building was erected 
many years ago, has been removed 
and placed in storage in the fire house. 

The firemen took precaution and had 
the heavy bell removed fearing that it 
might fall and go through the build- 
ing, causing an accident. The wood 
in the belfry is rotting and it was 
feared might give way under the 
weight of the bell, so it was decided 
to take it down. 

Hereafter the members of the hook 
and ladder company will not be sum- 
moned by the old familiar soul d of 
the tire bell. The bell was nia.i- 
Henry N. Hooper & Co., in Boston, in 
1855, and is almost as good as the da.\ 
it was placed in the tower. Courier. 

Indianapolis. Ind.. firemen have re- 
ceived permission to take off their 
coats going to and from meals, pro- 
vided "they wear clean shirts and 
suspenders, or neat bells." 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Singular Case of Firefighting. 

A Wilmington (Del.) correspondent 
of the Philadelphia Record, writing to 
that paper of a recent fire in that city, 
says: 

"Sitting in his room on the eleventh 
floor of the Hotel DuPont, a guest 
threw a lighted cigarette stump out 
the window and it fell on the awning 
over the window on the floor below. 
The awning caught fire and blazing 
pieces of canvas dropped to the awn- 
ings on the floors below. In a short 
time the front of the hotel was in 
flames from the sidewalk to the elev- 
enth floor. The Phoenix fire company 
was summoned, and then there en- 
sued a long argument as to the best 
method of fighting the fire. A crowd 
collected and gave the firemen much 
advice, and then the Phoenix mem- 
bers and members of other companies 
became involved in an argument as to 
the fire-fighting qualities of the va- 
rious volunteer companies in the city. 
Finally, all the awnings in a straight 
line from the tenth floor to the street 
were destroyed, and as none others 
caught fire the services of the firemen 
were not required. 

Fire Chief Stetson of Seattle, in his 
annual report for 1914, asks for an in- 
crease of $272,085 for salaries and 
maintenance from the City Council. 
The biggest part of this increase over 
the present year's fund is accounted 
for because of the double platoon sys- 
tem inaugurated last April and ap- 
proved by a vote of the electors at the 
general election March 5th last. The 
largest item in the fire department 
estimate is that of salaries. For the 
present year $506,795 was allowed. 
For the coming year $748,430 will be 
required. The grand total of the de- 
partment's estimate for the coming 
year is $894,275 against $622,190. 

Augusta, Ga., is endeavoring to pro- 
vide a pension and retirement plan for 
members of its police and fire depart- 
ments who have served twenty-five 
years. A hill empowering the city 
officials to grant pensions amounting 
to one-half pay to the officers and men 
who have served the required period 
has been introduced in the State legis- 
lature and it will probably pass, as it 
has the support of the local represen- 



tatives in the assembly. Under the 
law as it stands at present pensions 
shall be granted only when a police- 
man or fireman secures a physician's 
certificate indicating that he is inca- 
pacitated from discharging his duties. 

While answering an alarm from the 
cornerof Elizabeth street and McClure 
avenue, Peoria, 111., at 2 a. m., July 
15, a team of horses drawing a fire 
wagon from West Bluff house No. 3 
ran into a live wire and both were 
killed. A trolley pole had fallen dur- 
ing a thunder storm raging at the 
time, dragging down several wires 
and sending in an alarm. Fireman 
George Day, who was driving the 
team, was uninjured. The team came 
from the same house which recently 
lost two fire auto trucks in a collision 
in which several firemen were injured. 

The Oklahoma City Fire Depart- 
ment, consisting of ninety men, struck 
July 26 because the City Commission- 
ers had cut their wages and dismissed 
their chief. Their places are being 
filled temporarily by thirty citizens 
told off by the emergency fire chief. 
When the proposed cut in wages was 
announced several days ago the fire- 
men threatened to walk out. The 
commissioners then discharged Fire 
Chief Kesler, whose salary had been 
reduced from $180 to $150 a month, 
and the men, whose $85 a month had 
been reduced to $80, left their stations 
at a given signal. 

The volunteer fire company of East 
Dubuque, la., has voted to disband. 
Copies of the resolution taking this 
step, signed by 34 members of the 
organization, have been forwarded to 
the City Council and insurance com- 
panies. The firemen's action is the 
result of several grievances, the most 
recent being the granting of the use 
of their hall for public meetings with- 
out consulting the officers of the com- 
pany, and the storage of other city 
property in the fire house. 

The Brooklyn department of the 
New York Fire Department has re- 
cently been equipped with 48 electric 
extinguishers, which are the first that 
have been put in use in Brooklyn. The 
Electn'ne Company has recently sold 
two dozen extinguishers to the Cin- 
cinnati Fire Department. 



Milwaukee Pension Rule. 

No more firemen will be placed on 
the pension list in Milwaukee, unless 
discharged from the force or disabled 
so they cannot perform fire service, 
even though they may have been mem- 
bers of the department 22 years. 
Section 543, State laws of 1913, per- 
mits the Pension Board to use its dis- 
cretion in granting retirement appli- 
cations. Heretofore when a fireman 
had served 22 years he must, under 
the law, be pensioned whether inca- 
pacitated or not. This rule is said to 
have been taken advantage of by 
members of the department who were 
not physically disqualified for further 
fire fighting. It also reduced the 
ability of the pension fund to meet 
the requirements of firemen and 
widows of firemen who were consid- 
ered entitled to pensions. The new 
law was passed by the present legis- 
lature, and is immediately operative. 

When called upon recently for eligi- 
ble men for the department the City 
Civil Service Commission of Spokane. 
Wash., said it could not furnish the 
men as there was no one on the eligi- 
ble list. An examination was, how- 
ever, held, and the commission ex- 
pects to have the required men within 
a few days. 

Drop a gentle tear over the plight 
of the Burlington, N. J., firemen, says 
the Herald. If they obey the orders 
of one chief, the other chief fires them. 

Samuel Conwell, 58 years, a member 
of the Peru, Ind., Fire Department, 

i was instantly killed recently by elec- 
trocution. He and several other men 

: were putting in a new fire box, and 
Conwell, who had some experience as 
a lineman, volunteered to tap the city's 
electric light wire and make the neces- 
sary connections. He was at the top 
of a 40-foot pole when his fellow work- 
men heard him shriek and saw him 
tumble into a mass of wires, from 
which he soon fell. His head struck 
the brick pavement and he was d»ad 
when picked up. 



Phone Merritl 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



PACIFIC KIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Mission life in early California is 
graphically depicted in "The Rose of 
theRancho," which is to be revived 
in response to popular request next 
Monday night and throughout the 
week at the Alcazar, with Bessie 
Barriscale, Forrest Stanley, Howard 
Hickman and an augmented support. 
Constructed by David Belasco and 
Richard Walton Tully, two native sons 
of this state, the play treats of the 
stirring period when hud-hungry 
Americans were dispossessing the 
Spaniards who had held the soil for 
centuries — when Spanish pride, re- 
sentment, passion and inertia were 
pitted against business shrewdness 
and activity. Among the places 
shown are the garden of the Mission 
at San Juan Batista— a glorious stage 
picture^and the patio and roof a 
ranch house which three generations 
of women defend against "Gringo" 
invaders. Youngest of this trio is 
Juanita, in whose veins is American 
as well as Spanish blood, and the im- 
pulses of the two races, her double 
inheritance, keep her soul in constant 
conflict. Love bids her wed a young 
American, but pride demands that she 
marry a Spaniard. Out of her heart- 
turbulence flows the play. 

Empress Theatre. 

The headline offering on the bill for 
the coming week will be the "Seven 
Lozano Troupe," an aggregation of 
intripid wirists. who hail from Europe 
and pronounced the acme of grace and 
agility in wire walking feats. Another 
added attraction on the new bill is 
"Spooks," a comedy mystery playlet 
by Bayone Whipple and Walter Hous- 
ton. A delight ful terpsiehorean treat 
will be offered by Miss Beth Stone, 
late of "The Spring Maid," assisted 
by the clever dancing comedians Al. 
Hines and John Kenton, presenting 
their uniqUe "Story Dances." Matt 
Keefe, the noted tenor and yddeler, 
will be heard in melodies dear to the 
heart. Mitchell & Lightner, singing 
and talking comedians, direct from 
New York, should gain popularity with 
our Western audience. Harry Antrim, 
"The Odd Fellow," in imitations of 
Mr. and Mrs. Hen and Father and 
Mother Duck and all accurately done. 
Other added features and the Fssan- 
ceescope make up a good bill. 



Gorham Motor-Propelled Pumping Engines 

SOLD IN CALIFORNIA 




TYPE OF STRAIGHT PUMPING ENGINE 



Oakland 

2 Pasadena 

3 San Diego 

4 Los Angeles 

5 Los Angeles 

6 Los Angeles 

7 San Diego 

8 San Diego 



Straight Pump 
Combination Hose & Pump 



9 San Diego I Combination Hose & Pump 

10 Visalia . 1 

I 1 Bakersfield I " " " " 

1 2 Los Angeles I 

I 3 Los Angeles ... I Straight Pump 

14 Los Angeles 1 Combination Hose & Pump 

1 5 Sacramento I 

Note. — There are more Gorham Motor Propelled Pumping Engines sold and in service in 
the State of California than all other makes combined 

There is a reason. I5T MERIT TELLS. ASK THE CITY THAT OWNS ONE 

Gorham Fire Apparatus Company 



SEATTLE 
82 & 84 W. Manor. Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Steeet 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 South Olive Slteet 



When YouVe Buyin 9 Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 





good oil, say 



PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Sole Distributor for the Pnclflc Coast 543 CloluYn flnte Ave., San Francisco 



PACIFIC NRKMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK EiHtorand Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance ,., $2.00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 

continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Pustoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under Ihe Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



Strenuous Day for the Department. 

Occasionally the Business Manager fur the 
Pacific Fireman ernes around to collect sub- 
scriptions at the different fire houses, ano it 
so happened that last Sunday was one of 
those days. On leaving; the house apparatus 
was rolling from all directions in response to 
box 99, which was a second alarm fire. The 
first stop was at engine 5 and everything was 
quiet. The next stop was engine 31, and while 
there the first box 256 came in, followed im- 
mediately by vicinity box 311, and looking 
across the intervening space a sheet of flariie 
and column of smoke were seen soaring sky- 
wards. Reference to the assignment book 
showed that engine 20 did not respond 10 that 
box on the first alarm, but when within three 
blocks of the house engine 20 rolled on the 
second call from 311, so the fire was the next 
s'op and proved a very interesting spectacle, 
it' one could take it all in. A four-story man- 
sion had the entire upper floor burnt off and 
there being a strong wind the roofs of four 
other residences were burning at the same 
time, two of them being two blocks away. 
The next stop was at engine 26 which was 
away on the third alarm from 311 and 36 was 
covering in. Next he jumped clear across 
the city to engine 10 and truck 7; they were 
out to a grass fire. The next stop was en- 
gine 16; they had been out to butchertown and 
just got back, so he decided to take the jinx 
off by coming home. 

There is a moral to this tale. If your sub- 
scription is due. or nearly so, pay up before 
the next collection trip, which may be to- 
morrow, and you will probably have a more 
quiet day. 

Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

At a meeting- of the Fire Commission, held 
August 8. the following excerpts from the 
Administrative Committee's report were ap 
proved by the Board: 

Communication from Battalion Chief Rad- 
ford, reporting the suspension of FranK 
Powers, hoseman engine 13, on July Slat, for 
addressing his superior officer. Capt. Newell, 
in a disrespect ful and insolent manner on that 
date. After an investigation of this matter 



vour committee find as follows: Captain 
Newell stated that he thought the ends of 
discipline would be subserved if Hoseman 
Powers would apply for a transfer to some 
other company. Hoseman Powers thereupon 
expressed his willingness to make applica- 
tion for a transfer to some other company 
without any suggestion from the committee. 
The committee therefore recommends that in 
view of the suggestion of Captain Newell 
himself and the voluntary wish of Mr. Powers 
fora transfer, that the complaint be dismissed 
and that Powers be restored to duty. 

From the fiupt. of Engines, submitting a 
list of members and employes of the depart- 
ment who rendered service at the recent forest 
fire in Mill Valley. Filed. 

From the chief engineer, reporting having 
detailed Thos. Collins, hoseman engine 41, as 
operator to the second assistant chief engi- 
neer, vice Jas. Taylor, restored to the position 
of hoseman, to take effect from August 1. 
Filed. 

From J. H. Elrod, hoseman engine 35, re- 
questing that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for fifteen days, without pay, commenc- 
ing Aug. 4. Granted. 

From Eugene McCoy, submitting a com- 
plaint against Thos. McCarthy, hoseman en- 
gine 10, for not paying an indebtedness aue 
him. McCarthy appeared before the com- 
mittee and promised to make a satisfactory 
settlement. Complaint dismissed. 

From Battalion Chief Britt, requesting that 
he be allowed a leave of absence for three 
weeks, with permission to leave the city, on 
account of sickness. Granted. 



Portland Firemen Arrest Masher. 

Considerable excitement was caused in 
Portland, Ore., last week when firemen from 
engine company 30 pursued and captured 
Car! Olson, charged with molesting women 
on the street. He turned upon them' and 
threw a stone which b truck Hoseman 
Bert Shipman, causing concussion of the 
brain and necessitating his removal to the 
Good Samaritan Hospital where he is doing 
nicely. 

Chief Murphy, with his family, is spending 
his vacation on his ranch. 



For Flowers for all occasions call up Mission 
5988. J. J. O'Connor, 2756 Mission Street. 

Captain Hannan of engine 34, who spent his 
vacation in Denver, arrived home on the 6th 
inst. He reports having a pleasant outing. 

The results of the test of the Webb chemi- 
cal, which took place Friday, Aug. l t have 
not as yet come before the Fire Board, there- 
fore we refrain from commenting. 

There are many firemen at Adams Springs. 
It seems to be the favorite resort this season. 
Captain Kehoe of engine 4 says his daily 
average is four gallons of the water. 



Captain Kenneally of engine 14, with his 
family, is spending his vacation at Adams 
Springs. No more outings to Mendocino 
Wilds for Kenneally, with Captains Conniff 
and Lerman. 



Calendar of matters submitted to the Board 
upon which no action was taken by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee, as follows; 

From the Civil Service Commission, certi- 
fying Antone Swanberg for appointment as 
truckman. Laid over one week 

Consideration of bids for one or more 
motor driven gasoline tractors-. Laid over 
one w eek. 

From the Civil Service Commission, certi- 
fying Daniel H. Farley for engineer. Ap- 
pointed. 

On the advice of Drs. Lagan and Bodkin 
J. Buker was granted thirty days' leave of 
absence. 

Base Ball. 



Truck company 4's nine defeated engine 
35's nine by a score of 12 to 10 Wednesday. 

A nine composed of members of engine com- 
pany 6 will cross bai.s with a nine composed 
of members of truck company 2, Thursday 
forenoon, August 14th, ai the Souihside play 
grounds. Don't fail to be on hand, as the 
hoys are expected to put up a great game. 



The bovs of engine 9 are lamenting the loss 
of their mascot "Frisco." He was accus- 
tomed to paying visits to all companies in 
district 1. They buried him with fitting cere- 
monies. 

It is thought the conference of the Fire 
and Civil Service Commissions with Mayor 
Rolph will take place some evening the com- 
ing week. There are 7 lieutenants, 2 captains 
and 1 battalion chief to be appointed. 

Operator Parry, we understand, has not 
been himself since he sustained that fall of 
30 feet while fighting a fire at California and 
Webster streets over a year ago. The boys 
of engine 15 admit that Parry is one of the 
best firefighters of Captain Whi taker's 
company. 

The entire business portion of Butte City, 
Glenn county, was destroyed by fire Aug. 7. 
The property loss is estimated at $60,000. 
The tire started in the kitchen of the Dyer 
Hotel, a two-story frame structure, and the 
business district was razed to the ground. 
, Citizens fought the fire with all the means at 
hand after the pump house, which furnished 
the town's water supply, had been burned, 
but their efforts availed little. 



We had the pleasureof shaking hands with 
Robert J. Loughery, formerly commissary at 
the corporation yard. He is now in the in- 
surance business and is doing well As he 
says, he likes to keep in touch with depart 
nient affairs, therefore he has renewed his 
subscription. 



Telephone Douglat 1255 

U. J. BORCK, THE TAILOR 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 
FIREMEN'S V UNIFORMS 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FlKEMAN 



Portland (Ore.) Fire News. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

Six fires on bridges in Portland since Wed- 
nesday have led officials of the fire depart- 
ment to believe that at least five of them were 
of incendiary origin. The first fire, which 
caused between $40,000 and $50,000 damage 
to the O. W. R. & N. bridge, occurred on 
Wednesday. At almost the same time a fire 
broke out on the trestle crossing Columbia 
slough, about 300 yards north of Columbia 
boulevard. This was put out by engine HO at 
Kenton, after a hole had been burned in the 
deck of the bridge. Shortly after midnight 
Wednesday an explosion on the Burnside 
bridge caused a small fire there which tied up 
the bridge for several hours and did quite a 
little damage. This was followed by another 
fire on the same bridge one hour later on the 
western end. Friday morning there was still 
another blaze on the same bridge which set 
fire to a pile of rubbish on the eastern ap- 
proach and did considerable damage. This 
was extinguished by engine 7 and truck 4. 
The last fire occurred Saturday on the Haw- 
thorne bridge and burned a hole about four 
feet in diameter in the bridge deck. This was 
put out by engine 22, after about $50 damage 
had been done. Immediately after this blaze 
Chief Dowell commenced an investigation. 

The fire on the O. W. R. & N. bridge looked 
very bad for a while. Engines 21 and 1, 
chemical 1 and truck 1 responded on a tele- 
phone alarm and immediately pulled a box 
which brought four more engines, two trucks, 
the fireboat and Chief Dowell, who imme- 
diately pulled a third alarm in which eight 
engines and two trucks responded to, and 
nearly all the companies in the department 
moved in close to the fire. The third alarm 
followed the box in just about two minutes. 
as the punch tape will show. 

Some yellow journalists tried to give the 
department and the administration a knock, 
but the clock in the Fire Alarm Telegraph 
office shows i hat a very fine piece of work was 
done in sending in such a prompt alarm. The 
boys worked at a disadvantage, there being 
nothing in their favor. Blocks soaked in 
creasote and tar create a terrible smoke 
and i he blazing tar dropped all over the boys 
as they handled their lines under the bridge. 
The bridge is a doubledecker and the fire was 
fought from the lower bridge as well as on 
top, and the boat did good work with its tur- 
rets. The bridge was in service thirty-six 
hours after the fire. 

Another thing which gave the paper a shock, 
which had tried lo knock the department, was 
the fact that a moving picture of the fire was 
taken. The camera man was on the scene 
about ten minutes after the box was pulled 
and some of the pictures were taken from the 
deck of the fireboat, and they sav "pictures 
won't lie." So it looks as if the attempt to 
discredit the chief and the boys was a dismal 
failure. 

Engine 17 had quite an exciting time sev- 
eral days ago. A little kitten belonging to 
one of the neighbors crawled through a ven- 



tilator hole in the rear of the house and walked 
around under the floor and then crawled up 
into the wall between two stud posts and 
stayed there all night crying and keeping 
everyone awake, and all sorts of schemes were 
tried to get pussy out but to no avail. Chief 
Holden was called upon, as he had designed 
the house, but he had overlooked putting in 
escape holes for cats. But he solved the 
problem without any trouble. Procuring a 
saw and an ax he cut a hole in the wall and as 
soon as the opening was made, the boys say, 
they saw one black streak, and kitty hasn't 
been seen s4nee. 

Examination for eligibles for the positions 
of hosemen, iaddermen and pi perm n is being 
held this week. About 131 young men are 
ready to try the stunts. To be eligible to the 
examination a man must have been a resident 
of Portland one year immediately previous to 
filing his application for examination. Be 
sound physically, at least 5 feet 7 inches tall 
and weigh not less than 135 pounds. Any ap 
plicant over 225 pounds will be rejected; also 
will reject any applicant whose waist measure 
exceeds his chest measure. Age limit is from 
21 to 35 years. The written test is twenty 
words inordinary use in the department, lu^fc; 
simple problems in addition, subtraction, mul- 
tiplication and division, \0fy; Penmanship 
marked on legibility, 10?< ; physical condition 
(perfect) 20%. Athletic tests. Climbing an 
80-foot perpendicular ladder up one side over 
the top and down the other side. ; climbing an 
inclined ladder five rounds hand over hand; 
carrying a 125-pound dummy up and down a 
36-foot ladder; jumping 35 feet into a Brow- 
den net and running 80 yards in 12 seconds, 
50%. An average of 75% is necessary to get 
on the eligible list. The pay is $80 per month 
for one year, then $90 per month for the sec- 
ond year, then $100 per month. Twenty-four 
hours off in every eight days from 7 p. m. to 
7 p. m.; 14 days' vacation each year, vaca- 
tions in effect during the entire vear; seniori- 
ty counts in getting the best periods. 

Members of the department, who contri- 
buted to the publicity fund for the promotion 
of the pension bill voted to turn their share 
of the balance in the fund over to the hand 
to help the boys on their trip to New York. 
About $150 was contributed. Others of the 
contributors to the publicity fund voted to 
have their money returned to them. 

The ticket selling campaign that was 
launched Friday shows every sign of being a 
huge success. One contribution of $150; four 
gave $100 each and six or seven gave$50each. 
Too much praise cannot he given Joe Duzel, 
hoseman engine 25. and in em be is of the band. 
Joe is one of the kind of men who will do any- 
thing possible for Pome one else, bill can't do 
a thing for himself. He is certain)] working 
very hard to make the trip a success; and I 
believe Joe's famous smile, which won't come 
off, had a lot to do with some of those large 
contributions. Here's good luck to you, Joe; 
a few more likeyouin this world would make 
it a lot better place to live in. 

The excursion on theGrahmona was a great 
success. The boys had a fine crowd and a 



better time could not be had. The Conrad 
boys presided over the refreshments and 
made good from the start. The dancing on 
the deck was hard on your feet but no one 
noticed it until the next morning. Everyone 
had a good old-fashioned time. Those of the 
party that did not care to dance watched the 
scenery and listened to the orchestra. Ex- 
Chief Kingsley made an excellent floor 
manager; he is the Drum Major of the Band. 

A portable blacksmith shop which will be 
used to shoe the fire department horses is to 
be installed bv the commissioners. A regular 
fire horse is to be used to haul the shop and 
the horse will work in the place of the horse 
being shod. This will do away with all the 
shoe-day troubles, such as changing from the 
three- horse hitch to the pole and sending one 
horse to the shop at a time so the engine can 
remain in service, and in companies where 
there is a two-horse engine, the engine is put 
out of service for half a day. 

The fireboat Campbell quickly stopped a 
dangerous fire in the Fulton lumber district 
Saturday night. The blaze was in the engine 
and boiler house of the Oregon Box Company, 
and did about $2,000 damage. Several canoe 
parties on the river had narrow escapes from 
the swells of the boat, but the harbor patrol 
launch followed and kept a lookout for over- 
turned shells. Several river men said the 
boat was going about 16 miles per hour when 
she passed the Portland Lumber Co's plant. 

Resolutions adopted by the old Citv Execu- 
tive Board two years ago on the death of ex- 
Fire Chief Campbell, who was killed in the 
Union Oil Company fire on the East Side, will 
be engrossed and framed and placed on the 
new fireboat named after the deceased chief. 
This action has been determined by Mayor 
Albee. 

A donation of $25.00 from the St. Charles 
Hotel Company has been received by the 
chief and will be turned into the pension fund. 
The letter accompanying the check praised 
the work of the department very highly dur- 
ing the fire at Fisher& Thompson's paint store 
and warehouse. The St. Charles hotel is 
across the street from Fisher & Thompson's. 

Engine company 23, at East Seventh and 
Stephens streets, expects to move into their 
new home this week. It is a brick house 
built especially for auto apparatus. Chief 
Holden drew the plans and superintended the 
construction. 

Truck 3's new house is going up fast. All 
the brick walls are up and the roof is being 
put on. 

The report of the Widows' ami Orphans' 
fund for July is as follows: fash on hand. 
(1,885.26; city improvement bonds paying I 
(8,188.23. Total, $5,068.48. Sick and hcc! 
dent benefits paid during July, $214 00. 



ROSENBLIMABRAHAIW CO. Inc. 

TAILOkS POR MKIN 
IIO0 MARKET ST. 
ODD FELLOWS BUILDING 

II..-.. \l„l.-i 1503 
UNIFORMS OUR SPECIALTY UNION LABEL USED 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



American -La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 



llustrated Catalogue mailed on request 






Magnolia Nurseries 

Cur. 11 mi and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS:.. 



BROWN & KENNEDY 

FLORAL. 



Freeh cut flowers and hoquets always on hand. Also 

ornatnenta] and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention uiven Co Wedding and Funeral Order*. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs, 

Gardening, Etc. 

TRLEPHONE MISSION 1553 

T«« KKACH NiKSEMES. take Castro street car to 23rd. oi 

Mission. 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 




Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



112 S. Spring Si. 
Los Angeles 



717 K Sired 
Sacramento 



EAGLESON & CO. 

Importers and Manufacturers 

MENS FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1118 MARKET ST.. opp. Sevenih 
Ph™- WkH S4I7 SAN FRANCISCO 



Phonw 

FUNERAL WORK A SPECIALTY 
LOWEST PRICES 

3091 SIXTEENTH STREET 

NEAR VALENCIA 
UNION STORE SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Dongla- 2871 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKIRS 



Pr,one Dou„| a . 4716 



Home I. 2458 



LAMANETBROS 

HATS. UNI) RUFJAK. PTC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



77 THIiJl) STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

WM. F. EIGAN 

M. K. C. V. S. 

VETHKINAR\ SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 

1155 QOI.OBN GATE AYK. 

IVk-phooe- l;ok 117 and .118 Sfttl Francisco. CftL 



FOR the man in any line who plans to achieve, who ex- 
l eetfl to win hiwh place in his chosen callinc il < ie 
could he no better investment than a HOW AID 
Watch, living with a HOWARD is the surest way to 
absorb the accuracy, the punctuality, and practical time- 
saving thut America's successful men demur d us a mat- 
ter of course. 

Not ever? jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Waich. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, ami a printed ticket attached— from the 
17-jewel (double i oiler < in ;i Crescent Extra or 
Extra gold-filled case at Mn, to the 23- 
jewel ;it (150 — and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. 

Ad mil ai Sigsbee has written a little i ••■ 

•The L*»g if the Howard Watch." giving the 
record of his own Howard in the I' H V' ■■ > - 
v,,.- i ei jo) il Drop us n posi card, Depl N. 
and we'll send s ou a cods*. 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 

T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WAN LB ST.. SAN KRANOCO 



The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZN1K Proprietor 

The BEST TAILOR-MADE FIREMEN'S SHIRTS 

oil; SI'KCIALTY 
2>y6-0S GEARY STREET 

Corner Broderick 

Telephone Ww 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 







VOL. X.-NO. 39 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



National Woman's Fire Prevention Asso- 
ciation. 



An educational movement has been 
started which will prove of great value 
in the prevention of fire losses. Mrs. 
Eva McDonald Valesh, the president 
of the association, says: 

"We have organized the National 
Woman's Fire Prevention Association 
with the idea of teaching women poise, 
nerve, self-control, caution — in emer- 
gencies. Thirty seconds of wits is 
worth thirty minutes of screaming. 
We propose to teach women to use 
their wits, not their voices, when a 
calamity comes which a little calm 
will prevent nine times out of ten. 

"Our main idea is — poise in thirty 
seconds. 

"Siipp° se a woman catches fire at 
the stove or from the grate; or another 
steps on a match, or a puff of wind 
blows a gas jet against her dress. Our 
purpose is to instil in them just one 
thing — stop! think! just for a moment. 
Don't run. Pick up the nearest rug 
or table cover and wrap up in it. Then 
roll on the flames, or beat them out 
under the covering. But what does 
the average woman do at such a time? 
She screams, runs up and down, often 
jumps out of the window and dies 
miserably. 

"Again, your home has its little fire. 
Don-'-) waste time trying lo pui ii out. 
You may catch on fire yourself. Turn 
in an alarm. Very often you will have 
the engines in one minute. And every 
woman ought to know the location of 
t he nearest fire box. 

"One of my friends saw just what a 
woman ought not to do at a lire the 



other day. In the rear of an apart- 
ment house a big shed caught fire. 
The flames were shooting up two 
stories high, threatening at least two 
buildings filled with people. This 
woman could have turned in an alarm 
in fifteen seconds and brought the fire- 
men. Instead, she filled a dishpan 
with water and poured it on the roar- 
ingflames below; then she filled another 
and another. It took three engines 
pumping like mad to get the flames 
under control when they arrived ten 
minutes later. If the lady with the 
dishpan had turned in an alarm in- 
stead of running to her kitchen sink 
the damage would have been nothing, 
and $100,000 worth of property, be- 
sides a hundred lives, would not have 
been put in danger. 

"How many women know what to 
do in a theatre horror?— and we will 
have one some day. There is fire to 
face, and panic too. The impulse of 
the crowd is to escape by the way it 
came in, heedless of. perhaps, the 
twenty other exits which the law re- 
quires. We shall teach our women to 
look about them when they settle in 
their seats before the curtain goes up 
and pick out the nearest exit in case 
of fire and panic. That w ill divide the 
fleeing audience into a dozen streams 
of humanity and perhaps let every one 
escape. But who are the women to- 
day who take a look about them and 
pick out their particular exit in caseof 
emergency? 

"Some day we shall have a great fire 
in a crowded store. What women in 
the Store will know where the stair- 
cases are when they musl get out in a 
hurry? We will have another factor} 



fire. How many of the girls will know 
the quickest and safest way out? 

"Take another case of poise— a 
friend of mine who lived on the sixth 
story of a big apartment house was 
waked in the small hours of the morn- 
ing by smoke and the cry of fire. Her 
husband was rescuing their little girl 
and their small store of jewelry. They 
had to climb down the rear fire escape, 
with the crackling flames below them 
— the fire was on the first and second 
floors. It was raining and pitch dark. 
Back of them was a big apartment 
house, the windows filled with scream- 
ing women, who were not in the slight- 
est danger. Yet those who were in 
danger could not see to clutch the 
1'iiiigs of the ladders down which they 
had to climb through smoke to safety. 

"Turn on your electric lights, all of 
you. so that we can see to climb down," 
cried my friend. 

"And so they saw their way to 
safety. But nobody had thought of 
the lights before that. That was an 
example of poise, and in a woman! 

"As we get further along in out- 
classes we propose to show the women 
some real examples- horrible, per- 
haps, but none the less real. We may 
read of a woman hurtled to death. 

"Please. Mrs. So-and-So, go down 
to that address and find out for your- 
self how the woman's life could have 
been saved. 

"The real thing is to get that sub- 
conscious help to self-control which we 
all have in us if we can only bring it 
out. It is easier to teach the working 
girl or business woman this than it 
is to teach the society woman or the 

housekeeper. " 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Seattle, Washington. 

The following is the Fire Marshal's 
report to the City Council for the first 
six months of the year 1913: 
Value buildings involved $3,523,452.27 

Of contents of same 1,589,784.09 

Total value of buildings 

and contents involved 5,113,236.36 
Insurance on buildings... 2,443,968.50 

On contents of same 1,031,820.00 

Total insurance on build- 
ings and contents 3,475,788.50 

Loss on buildings 188,557.12 

On contents of same 354,527.61 

Total loss on buildings 

and their contents 543,084.73 

Loss on buildings where 

fires started 406,086.90 

Adjoining ones 136,997.85 

Alarms from street boxes, 149; by te- 
lephone, 336; given at the stations, 78; 
second alarms, 8; special calls, 11; 
third alarms, 1; total all kinds, 583; 
false alarms, 67; smoke mistaken for 
fire, 16; fires without any alarms, 7; 
calls for special work 14; fires with 
loss, 233; total number of fires, 475; 
fires caused by chimneys burning out 
and defective, 76; by cooking and 
heating appliances, 55; by sparks from 
flues and stacks, 49; by rubbish, 48; 
by gasoline and oils, 30; by matches 
and smoking, 30; by unknown causes, 
26; by electrical devices and wiring, 
20: by spontaneous ignition, 16; by 
incendiaries, 15; by gas, 15; by hot 
ashes, 6; by boiling over of grease, 
etc., 6; by steam pipes 4; by Christmas 
trees. 3; by vagrants, 3; by rekindl- 
ing, 3; by firecrackers, grease vents, 
alcohol stoves and drunken persons, 
each, 2; by thawing out of pipes, 
fumigating, hot iron, meat burning, 
coffee roaster, film and burning scen- 
ery, each, 1; there were 23 bridge or 
planking fires, 21 brush and stump 
and 9 grass fires. Number of brick, 
stone, or concrete buildings involved 
in fires, 31; frame, 197; automobiles, 
11; car's, 7; boats, 5; awnings, 8; tents, 
1; fires originating in vacant build- 
ings. 14; of total losses, 25; extending 
beyond thi first building. 16; beyond 
the second. 1; confined to floor where 
started, 90; special inspections of 
fires by fire marshal, 109; inspections 
for fireworks. 84; for fire escapes and 
exits, 94; complaints investigated, 
10J; firemen's inspections, 113. 
Harry W. Bringhurst. 
Fire Marshal. 



Meeting Veteran Firemen's Association. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Veteran Firemen's Association was 
held in their headquarters, 368 Fell 
street, Tuesday, Aug. 5. All of the 
officers, directors and a large number 
of members answered roll call. The 
Visiting Committee reported that 
Comrades Bell, Mooney, McAdoo and 
Farrell were about the same as when 
last reported upon, Battalion Chiefs 
Comrades O'Brien and Britt improv- 
ing. The death of Comrade Webb 
was reported. The association at- 
tended the funeral Saturday, Aug. 2, 
from his late residence, 926 Eagle 
avenue, Alameda. 

A very important resolution was 
adopted affecting every member, viz.: 
"All members who have failed to sign 
the Constitution, By-Laws and Bene- 
ficiary Books must do so without delay. 
After doing so, a certificate of mem- 
bership shall issue. Death benefits 
will be paid only on presentation of 
certificate, etc." One candidate was 
elected and three applications upon 
the secretary's desk. 

The net profits of the picnic held at 
Scheutzen Park last May, up to date 
is $645. The association will give a 
Ladies' Night on the evening of Labor 
Day, Monday, Sept. 1. The tickets 
will admit a comrade and ladies. If 
a comrade cannot attend he is per- 
mitted to transfer his ticket to a gen- 
tleman relative to escort his lady 
friends, or the ladies can attend with- 
out escorts if they so desire. 

The secretary, Past President F. C. 
Hensley, leaves San Francisco Wed- 
nesday, Aug. 20, for Atlantic City, as 
a representative to the Supreme Court, 
Foresters of America, which convenes 
there Tuesday, Aug. 26. He will leave 
Atlantic City on the 30th for New 
York. He will be in the metropolis 
during the session of the International 
Convention of Fire Chiefs. While in 
New York he will get full particulars 
relative to the uniform of the Veteran 
Firemen of N«w York, the same style 
of unforni having been adopted by the 
Veteran Firemen of San Francisco. 
He expects to begone a month or five 
weeks. 

Alter the disposition of the business 
a recess was taken to the assembly 
hall and a short time whiled away at 
cards and social intercourse. 



Pacific Coast Fire Chiefs' Convention. 

An excellent programme has been 
arranged for the Twenty-first Annual 
Convention of the Pacific Coast Asso- 
ciation of Fire Chiefs, at Tacoma, 
Wash., August 25-28 inclusive. Those 
attending will find themselves well re- 
paid, as many important subjects will 
be-discussed, and a large number of 
exhibits may be inspected. The fea- 
ture of the Tacoma convention that 
will be longest remembered, will be 
the trip to Mount Rainier. Chief 
George McAlevy and his local friends 
have made this trip possible, but only 
after a great deal of planning. The 
visiting chiefs and their wives and 
their friends will leave Tacoma early 
in the morning of Tuesday, August 
26th, by special train, and after going 
to the end of the railway, will be taken 
up the mountain in automobiles. 
Rainier is one of the highest peaks in 
the United States and the trip is fa- 
mous for its scenic beauty. 

Chief Bywater Vindicated. 

W. H. Bywater has been reinstated 
as fire chief at Salt Lake. The charge 
of manslaughter against him, based 
on the fact that an automobile in which 
he was a passenger, and not driver, 
ran over a little girl, was dismissed. 
The City Commission then promptly 
reinstated the chief, because of his 
demonstrated efficiency as the head of 
the fire department and as a fire- 
fighter. 

Woman Heroine of Fire. 



Fire destroyed a portion of the busi- 
ness section of Porterville, Cal., Sat- 
urday, Aug. 9, with a loss estimated 
at $85,000. Mrs. Nellie Burwell. night 
operator in the telephone office, re- 
mained at her post until she got a 
message through to Fresno saying 
that the building was burning. When 
she abandoned her board the flames 
were within a few feet of her. 



The Pacific Fireman $2.00 a year. 

Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Atrent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



F A C 1 K 1 C FIREMAN 






Alcazar Theatre. 

In compliance with popular demand 
the Alcazar management has decided 
to retain "The Rose of the Rancho" a 
second week, commencing' next Mon- 
day night, which will afford positively 
the last opportunities to witness the 
famous Belasco-Tully play in San Fran- 
cisco this season. It is the unanimous 
opinion that "The Rose of the Rancho" 
has never heen given a more perfect 
production in the Alcazar than it is 
now receiving. While the lion's share 
of acting honors is awarded Bi ssie 
Barriscale in the title part, her prin- 
cipal associates come in for no small 
share of the plaudits so lavishly be- 
stowed after each curtain-fall. As 
for the pictorial side of the production, 
upon which so much depends, it justi- 
fies application of the much-worked 
adjective, "sumptuous." David Be- 
lasco's ideas of "atmosphere" have 
been faithfully adhered to by Stage 
DirectorButlerand his corps of artists 
and mechanics, and the result would 
'surely satisfy the great wizard of 
stagecraft if he could witness it. In 
a word, "The Rose of the Rancho" is 
exquisitely presented in all its details. 
Eugene Walter's great play, "The 
Wolf," is announced to follow, closing 
the Barriscale-Stanley-Hickman en- 
gagement. 

Empress Theatre. 

Miss Grace Cameron, better known 
as the "Dolly Dimples Girl," will be 
the headline star at the Empress Thea- 
tre during the week. Her voice is of 
unusual sweetness and range. The 
big added attraction in the new show 
is "Dorothy's Playmates," a one-act 
musical fantasy. This act has been | 
hooked especially for the delight of j 
the children, imitations of animals' 
and birds being featured by ten sing- 
ing and dancing girls and boys of the 
company. Roberts, Hayes and Rob- 
erts will offer "On the Road." a co- 
medy based on incidents in a country 
hotel, "A Night in Chinatown," pre- 
sented li,\ Ralph Ash and Wynn Shaw; 
Hal Merritl. cartoonist and monolo- 
gist; Harry Leanderand his company 
of merry cyclists; two other added 
features and the Essancescope will 
complete the bill. 

Subscribe for the PACIFIC Fikkman 



Gorham Motor-Propelled Pumping Engines 

SOLD IN CALIFORNIA 




TYPE OF STRAIGHT PUMPING KNGINE 



1 Oakland . 

2 Pasadena 

3 San Diego 

4 Los Angeles 

5 Los Angeles 

6 Los Angeles 

7 San Diego 

8 San Diego 



Straight Pump 9 San Diego I Combination Hose & Pump 



Combination Hose & Pump 1 Visalia 



I 



II Bakersfield 1 " " " 

| 1 2 Los Angeles I 

13 Los Angeles ... I Straight Pump 

14 Los Angeles I Combination Hose & Pump 

1 5 Sacramento I 

Note. — There are more Gorham Motor Propelled Pumping Engines sold and in service in 
the State of California than all other makes combined 

There is a reason. O" MERIT TELLS. ASK THE CITY THAT OWNS ONE 

Gorham Fire Apparatus Company 



SEATTLE 
82 St 84 W. Marion Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 

48 Fremont Steeet 



LOS ANGELES 

1223 South Ol.ve Stteet 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to §;< 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Sole Distributor for the Pnclflc Const 54.1 OoluVn Onte Ave., S«l Francisco 





PACIFIC K1KKMAN 



P 



'AC1FI 




IREHAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance J2.00 

Six months . 1.IH) 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the must favorable terms, especially large and 

continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postorfice at San Francisco, Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 

There is a rumor current in Los Angeles 
(and it has jumped clear to New York) that 
Chief Eley is to be restored to his civil ser- 
vice rank of captain and ihat the new admin- 
istration will install as chief, Captain H. Hill, 
who is not onlv a good fire fighter, hut also 
served as a different kind of fighter in the 
Spanish war. Chief Elev has proven himself 
a very capable man and has conducted the 
Los Angeles Fire Department in a very credi- 
table manner. 

A feature of the International Association 
of Fire Engineers' Convention will be a mov- 
ing picture record of the important exhibition 
at New York, September 1 to 6. and this 
means Ihat the movies will reproduce through- 
out the country the interesting features of 
the convention, so that not only the chiefs 
who were unable to attend but the rank and 
file of the departments will he able to see 
what was done at the most interesting con- 
vention ever held by this organization. 

Cost of Electric Fire Apparatus. 

The onlv storage battery driven fire engine 
in New York city has been under test since 
April, 1912. The engine has cost $388 74 to 
maintain t'ortheyear This is compared with 
$655 26 thai ii costs to care for a team of three 
horses to haul the same machine. In making 
the conversion to motor apparatus an engine 
was used t hit t bad been ten years in service. 
A steel frame was built forward from the 
boiler and to this were mounted the driving 
gear and controlling apparatus, consisting of 
two couple geared wheels, the usual steering 
devices and a controller similar to the equip- 
ment of a trolley car. An 80-cell storage 
battery completed ihe installation. Thus 
engine 217 became a straight electric machine 
hs far as motive power was concerned and 
remained » standard fire engine as concerns 
it:, pumping and fiiefigbling ability. Before 
it weni into service it was put through a series 
of speed i rials in which ii no de a six mile run 
through the city streets in 23 minutes, on one 
stretch developing a speed exceeding 20 miles 
an hour, while a hill seven eighths of a mile in 
length was negotiated in 2 minutes and 35 
seconds. 



Fire Department Items. 

[From Our Exchanges.! 

Livermore, Cal., is considering the purchase 
of gasoline-propelled fire engine apparatus, 
it having been decided that the fire depart- 
ment is in need of improvements. 

The Vancouver Fire and Police Committee 
has authorized Chief Carlisle to attend the 
convention of the International Fire Chiefs' 
Association at New York, Sept. 1 to 6. 

Los Angeles had a fire within a fire house. 
A defective heater caused a fire in the house 
of engine 6 at Edgeware Road and Temple 
street, causing damage to the property of 
about $1000. 

Oakland has installed four automatic signal 
horns connected with the fire alarm building, 
and when they are sounded all street cars and 
traffic will stop at these points, giving the fire 
department the right of way. 

The Los Angeles Fire Commission is seek- 
ing authority to exceed the $500 limit on con- 
tracts to secure changes in the San Pedro fire 
house, the installation of a motor-driven 
pumping engineand new quarters for firemen. 

Sacramento, Cal., is completing its fire 
alarm system and has installed twelve addi 
tional fire alarm boxes throughout the annex- 
ed district of Oak Park. More boxes are due 
from the factory and the system is to be 
completed. 

Stockton, Cal. Twelve motor trucks for the 
fire department ordered by the City Council 
will cost approximately $80,000. Three pump- 
ing engines, three hook and ladder trucks and 
six combination trucks will be ready for use 
by November 1st. 

Bakersfield. Cal., has just received two auto 
chemicals, ihe first of the new fire apparatus 
to reach there. They cost $12,000. Other 
motor apparatus coming includes two motor 
engines and two motor chemical and hose 
wagons combined. 

Fire Chief Eley of Los Angeles has been 
seriously ill for several days in the engine 
house at Maple avenue and Fifih street, it not 
being safe to remove him. The fire house 
has been turned into a hospital for a few 
days and the chief is under the care of a 
trained nurse. 

Fire Chief George A. Bartlett is in receipt 
of $20 for the tire department from Fitzgerald 
& Brown, proprietors of the Home Baking 
Company, as a token of appreciation for the 
valuable services of the department at the 
time of the recent fire at their bakery.— San 
Mateo Times, Aug. 5. 

Pomona, Cal.. is considering the purchase 
of an automobile fire engine and motor hook 
and ladder truck. These are planned to take 
the place of the present horse-drawn truck, 
which has become inadequate to the needs of 
the growing community. The satisfactory 
service given by an automobile hose and 
chemical truck used by Ihe city for several 
years has resulted in favorable consideration 
for motor power fire-fighting equipment. 



The Spokane Fire Department has compiled 
its budget for 1914 and the total asked, includ- 
ing all betterments, equipment, station sites, 
supplies ana salaries, is $209,270. The total 
for 1911 was $230,00(1 and for 1912 $192,543. 
The estimate for 1914 provides for two 90 
horsepower combination hose and chemical 
wagons, one automobile service truck and 
one combination pumping and hose wagon. 
This new apparatus will greatly reduce the 
maintenance charge, as it will replace four- 
teen horses and reduce the number of men by 
four. Five thousand additional feet of hose 
is asked and $1,000 for repairs to the fire 
alarm system. 

For Flowers for all occasions call up Missien 
S9S8. J. J. O'Connor, 2756 Mission Street. 

Oregon Volunteer Firemen. 

The volunteer firemen of the Willamette 
Valley, some two months ago, held a meeting 
at Albany, and it was decided to hold the 
Volunteer Firemen's Tournament of Oregon 
at Corvallis. 

In bringing this tournament to Corvallis the 
firemen are striving to demonstrate that re. 
suits in fire-fighting cannot be accomplished 
without the necessary equipment. This will 
be the first opportunity publicly to show in 
this section of Oregon the different apparatus 
used in combatting fires. Manufacturers of 
this equipment will exhibit their products 
during the meeting. 

The public will see what has been done in 
the past three years by members of the Cor- 
vallis Volunteer Department. Three years 
ago Corvallis had four hose carts, carrying 
about 1200 feet of hose, one small chemical 
cart, one hand pump and one lacder wagon, 
all of which were pulled by hand. To-day 
Corvallis has a central station in which is in- 
stalled a three-horse chemical wagon, which 
carries 1400 feet of regulation hose, one 60- 
gallon chemical tank with 200 feet of chemical 
hose, roof ladders and all necessary equip- 
ment for fighting fire. 

The department also has a truck carrying a 
65-foot extension ladder, one of 30 feet, one 
of 24 feet and one of 20 feet, and others of 
shorter length, 350 feet of hose and all small 
necessities. 

The night crew consists of six men — the 
driver, who is the only paid man, two nozzle 
men, one plug man, one chemical man and one 
driver, who has charge of a team that is kept 
in the hall at night only for the ladder truck. 

Corvallis did not get this additional equip- 
ment without work, but when the people of 
Corvallis were shown what could be done with 
improved apparatus, the new equipment was 
secured. 



ROSENBLIMABRAHAM CO. Inc. 

TAILORS FOR MEN 

IIOS MARKET ST. 

ODD FELLOWS BUILDING 
Phone Market 1503 

UNIFORMS OUR SPECIALTY UNION LABEL USED 



PACIFIC FIKEMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 



At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
August 15, the following recommendations 
from the Administrative Committee's report 
were approved by the Board: 

From the Superintendent of Engines, re- 
porting that the City of Napa returned on 
the 7th instant the steam fire engine loaned 
to that city a few days ago. Filed. 

From the Ingleside Improvement Club, re- 
questing that three fire alarm boxes be in- 
stalled at certain designated locations in that 
district. On the recommendation of Acting 
Chief Engineer Maxwell your committee re- 
commend that the Department of Electricity 
be requested to install a box No. 965 at Hollo- 
way avenue and Ramsell street. 

From A. Isaacs, lieutenant engine 5, re- 
questing that he be allowed salary during dis- 
ability, resulting to an injury to his foot re- 
ceived while responding to an alarm of fire 
on July 18. Allowed. 

From George Andrews, gateman high pres- 
sure auxiliary water system, requesting the 
approval of the Board to his action in forming 
a baseball league amongst the members of 
the department. Action approved. 

From Auditor Boyle, advising that that de- 
partment has received no monthly reports of 
the claims of the city and county against the 
State for its share of the maintenance of the 
firehoats since last February, and requesting 
that these claims be tiled monthly. Superin- 
tendent of Engines directed to file a state- 
ment of these claims with this office as soon 
as possible. 

From the California Credit Company, sub- 
mining a complaint against Eugene Gill, 
hoaeman engine 5, for neglecting to pay a 
claim against, him for clothes furnished. Gill 
appeared before vour committee and agreed 
to make a settlement of this claim in full by 
Nov. 12, and your committee recommend that 
the complaint be dismissed. 

From Gabriel Cuneo, hoseman engine 32, 
requesting that he be allowed salary during 
disability, resulting from a fractured jaw re- 
ceived during a quarrel with some person on 
July 25. Your committee made an investiga- 
tion of this matter. Cuneo claims that he 
was assaulted by some unknown person while 
on his meal hour on that date. In view of 
tin- fact that said injury was not sustained in 
the actual performance of du-tv your commit- 
tee recnmmend that bis application bedenied. 

Prom i lie Superintendent of Engines, re- 
porting that keys to the watchman's clock in 
service al t he corpora I inn yard were stolen 
from tin' station boxes on the 4th and Otb 
inst. After an investigation of this matter 
your committee find that it is impossible to 
obtain ;niv il-tiiiiii- information as to who took 
said keys and accordingly recommend that the 
satne be tiled. 

From 1 he Suporintendent of Engines, re- 
porting that a magneto was stolen from the 
corporation yard some time between Friday 
afternoon and Monday morning. After an 
investigation of this matter your committee 
is unable to tix the responsibility for the dis- 



appearance of this magneto and would recom- 
mend that a stricter surveillance be main- 
tained over the department stores at the cor- 
poration yard. 

From Daniel Ahem, harnessmaker at the 
corporation yard, requesting that he be al- 
lowed salary for one and one-half days 
during the month of July, time absent from 
duty while acting on the Committee of One 
Hundred appointed by the Mayor to further 
the adoption of the bond issue for municipal 
street railroads. Denied, as the Board has no 
power to grant this request. 

From Acting Chief Engineer Maxwell, re- 
porting that he has temporarily transferred 
chemical company 9 to the Panama- Pacific 
Exposition grounds for fire protection pur- 
poses pending the establishment of permanent 
companies there. Said assignment taking 
effect on the 12th inst. Approved. 

From the American-La France Fire Engine 
Company, requesting an extension of 60 days 
on their contract for delivery of motor driven 
hook and ladder truck. Granted. 

From the Secretary, requesting the Board 
to rescitid that portion of Item "'n" of the 
Administrative Committee report of July 25, 
1913, wherein they recommend that the Civil 
Service Commission be requested to certify 5 
truckmen and 2 hosemen for appointment in 
the department. Approved. 

Portland (Ore.) Fire News. 

[Special Correspondence 1 

There has been considerahleink spilled over 
the fact that the fireboat Campbell's centri- 
fugal pumps did not pick up water as fast as 
usual at a test given by Mayor Albee last week. 
After a trip to the berth of the boat and a talk 
with the engineer, a verv capable man, the 
trouble was explained. The pumps and other 
machinery run condensing into a surface con- 
denser, which necessitates the use of an air 
pump to create a vacuum to decrease the 
pressure against which these machines ex- 
haust and also to carry away the condensed 
steam, thereby increasing the efficiency of 
the fire pumps. These air pumps, up to the 
present time, have stood idle except when on 
fire duty, etc., which caused delay in getting 
them warmed up and in working order before ' 
the pumps were started, but hereafter one 1 
pump is to be working slowlv at all times and i 
the other to be kept hot, so it can be started 
at once and in this way any delay will In- 
overcome. 

As an alarm from one of the mills below the 
Broadway bridge was sounded last Sunday 
afternoon, the Campbell slid from her berth 
at the foot of East Washington streel and 
shot down the river like a motor bout, palled 

up at the dock and st I fast with water 

pressure on all heraischarges. To all appear- 
ances the boat, was waiting for a chance to 
redeem herself and show her good qualities. 

The fire was of lilt I sequence, hot more 

than one of the boys on the Campbell prayed 
for a chance to cut loose with the turrets and 
show what they could do. We hoys in the 
business have all the confidence in the tamp 
hell wc had in Dave. The papers will knock 



and raise ned, but whenever there is a fire the 
Campbell, like our Dave, will be there and 
will produce the goods. 

M. Keeney, lieutenant truck 3, was dis- 
missed from the service by Mayor Albee on 
recommendation of the Board of Fire Chiefs. 
The grounds for dismissal were incompetency 
and a lack of interest in his duties. 

S. B. Morrow, driver engine 9, was also 
dismissed, as he was not reliable and came on 
duty late and tried to dictate to his superior 
officers. 

Captain Zellner of engine 31 and his crew 
deserve considerable praise for their fine work 
at the Lents fire last week. They held her 
down and were gaining on the fire when en- 
gine 23 arrived with the auto and reinforce- 
ments. Engines 19 and 27 were also sent to 
help as the fire was in a paint store and looked 
very bad. The boys had good hydrant pres- 
sure and the Lents citizens are very much 
pleased with their fine work. 

Out of 131 applicants for the position of 
hosemen in the department only 61 were 
passed by the doctor and the other 70 were 
refused on account of their physical condition. 
Out of the 61 passed by the doctor one re- 
fused to climb the 85-foot aerial ladder, and 
three refused to jump the 35 feet into the net. 
J. Fair did the 80-yard dash in 9| seconds, the 
fastest time made; the slowest was 12J sec- 
onds. Four of the 61 made 25 rounds in the 
hand over hand Two applicants only went 
part way up the aerial and came down. 

Speed of Motor Apparatus. 

Chief Hiram McLaughlin, Springfield, Mo., 
is reported to be protesting vigorously against 
a new city ordinance, which limits the speed 
of the fire apparatus to 30 miles an hour. He 
believes that this speed is excessive at some 
points in the city and is wofully slow at others, 
and asserts that the drivers are better able to 
judge the right speed for the operation of the 
apparatus than are memhers of the council.— 
Fireman's Herald. 



Truck 2 won the baseball game from engine 
6 Thursday by a score of 9 to 4. 

James K. Mack, editorand proprietor of the 
Pacific Fireman, has gone on his vacation. 

The Scannell Club met last Tuesday even- 
ing, and among other things decided that the 
duesshall be50centsperquarter. Thecharter 
will be kept open until Sept. 1. 

Deputy Fire Chief Sidney Rose returned to 
his duties in the Berkeley Fire Department 
Thursday, his first day on duty since his 
serious injury on December 7, 1912, when his 
automobile crashed into an Ellsworth street 
electric train while he was responding to a 
fire alarm. Kose nearly lost his life and was 
confined to a hospital for several months. 



Telephone Douglai 1255 

U. J. RnPCk.TH ETAIW 

MAKI S A SPI OALTY OF 

RIRErVIEIN'S '.' UNIFORMS 

ALSO FINS CIVILIAN SUITS 

93 EDDY STRI II San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 






American -La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 

151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



brown & KENNEDY Howard Watches 

FLORAL. 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also | 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wtddina and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gar/telling. Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Hkach Nursekies. take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Puuiilass and 24th streets. 





112 S. Spring Si. 
Los Angele* 



717 K Street 
Sacramento 



EAGLESON & CO. 



Importers and ManufacluM 



MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

IMS MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 



A 
R 

T 
I 

S 
T 
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I Horr.eM 1615 

I Marled 5725 

FUNERAL WORK A SPECIALTY 

lowest rnicEs 

3091 SIXTEENTH STREET 

NEAR VALENCIA 
UNION STORE SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Doigla. 2871 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 



SOLD KOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



Ph™,- Marlm ^417 



Phonr Dousla, 4716 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Home I 2458 



LAMANETBROS 

HATS. UNDKRWEAK. RTC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing (ioods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



77 TI1IWD SI'RKK'I' 

SAN FRANCISCO 

WM. F. EIGAN 



VHTHR|NAk\ SHRliKON TO S. F. F. 0. 



FOR the man in any line who plans to achieve, who ex- 
pects lo win high place in his chosen calling, there 
could tc no better investment than a HOWARD 
Watch. Living with a HOWARD is the surest way to 
adsorb the accuracy, the punctuality, and practical time- 
saving that America':-, successful men demand «s a mai- 
ler of course. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. Hh is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is alw;tys worth what you 
pay for it. 

The juice of each watch is fixed at the lac- 
tory, and n print.-.) ticket attached— from the 
17-jtw. 1 idouble roller' in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at $40, to the 23- 
jewel at Jinn — and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. 

Admiral KSgsb.ee has written h little book. 
'The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record of his own Howard in Hie I" S. N;n \ 
inu'i enjoy it. Dn»n us a post-card, Denl N. 
und we'll sen.l you a copy 

E. HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 

T. H. KILOO 

DIAMONDS AIND JEWELRY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



71 WALLER ST., 



1155 (iOI.DEN GATE AYE. 
Olephnnes l';.ik ll" and US San Francisco. Cal. Trlepho 



The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZNIK Proprietor 

The BEST TAILOR-MADE FIREMEN'S SHIRTS 

OUR SPECIALTY. 
2206-08 OEARY STREET 

Corner thoderuk 
. VtV s i 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 




VOL. X.-NO. 40 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 23, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



A Shorter Working Day For Firemen. 



By Captain W. E. Brown. Milwaukee. 



Paper Read nt Wisconsin Paid Ciremcn's Association, 
July 24. 1913. 

Shorter working days for firemen. 
It is, indeed, high time that something 
of consequence be done along this line 
to bring us to the much-mooted ques- 
tion of two-platoon or double shift. 
Seemingly a decided bugaboo to the 
average fire chief, who apparently 
steers clear of the proposition on the 
. basis of expenditure, besides not being 
applicable to the fire service, yet he 
will heartily approve of bonding his 
city for thousands of dollars for appa- 
i ratus. motor and otherwise, besides 
new houses, advocating the expendi- 
tures from a standpoint of general 
efficiency. Is it not a fact, permit me 
to ask. that the two-platoon system or 
fewer hours would, in like manner, at 
le ist proportionately improve the ser- 
vice from the same efficiency stand- 
point? The chief of Kansas City, Mo., 
also Chief Kenlon of New York — the 
last named, if you please, a most pro- 
gressive chief, at the head of our lar- 
gest fire department— tell us in all 
seriousness l hat the ado) it ion of a two- 
platoon system would have a tendency 
to decrease efficiency by reason of the 
f act ilia! firemen would frequent the 
saloon and partake of the flowing 
bowl; or, in other words, become 
habitual drunkards. In my way of 
thinking, statements of this nature 
are a libel on good men. However, be 
that as itmay, Kansas City has since 
adopted the two-platoon system with, 
so far as I can understand, great sat- 
isfaction to the "men vitally interested. 
There have been no serious complaints 



made by anyone against the conduct 
of firemen thus affected. Further- 
more, it is reasonable to assume that 
efficiency has not suffered thereby, by 
reason of the fact that men, home 
night or day, whichever shift they 
may be working under, are surely 
better enabled to withstand the rigor- 
our service, by naturally obtaining 
more rest while at home. Such, at 
least, is my contention. Some years 
hack Omaha commenced working 
upon the two-platoon saystem. Chief 
Salter offered the usual objection. 
Nevertheless, to offset a growing pub- 
lic feeling toward the amelioration of 
firemen's conditions, more offs and 
better salary were made and, in fact, 
granted; but, in spite of this, one of 
the firemen— Leeder by name — was 
nominated and duly elected to the 
State legislature, and managed, while 
a memberof that body, to have passed 
a 12-hour law for firemen. In the 
course of time it went into effect, 
against great opposition from the 
chief and the fire commission, but 
since that time the chief has frankly 
admitted that it is the only system 
and, incidentally, tells us that his de- 
partment has no superior. Surely 
that statement speaks for itself. 
Things in Omaha. In begin with, were 
certainly not conducive lo enjoying 
the two-platoon s\ st( m. ('< r the reason 
that shifts were constanl being 12 

hours either day or lilghl with no 
furlough or other time off. Appar- 
ently Salter and the con mission de- 
sired to make everybody sick and tired 
of I hissj stein. Likewise Salter would 
take absolutely no suggest ions for gen- 
eral improvement efficiency, if you 



please— from the men who fought for 
its orignal adoption. I might add that 
Engineer Leeder slept and ate two 
platoons previous to his going into the 
Assembly, therefore he was well 
equipped to assist in formulating a 
foundation base. 

I have already mentioned what Chief 
Salter said regarding his department 
since the adoption of the two-platoon 
system, which is evidence of its suc- 
cess. I will admit that Omaha is not 
a large city; yet. what a city of its 
size can do. surely New York, Chicago, 
Cleveland, Detroit and Milwaukee 
can. Some years ago, in New York, 
a test was made of the two-platoon 
system in, I believe, the third batta- 
lion. Chief Croker was a bitter oppo- 
nent and he detailed Chief Kenlon. 
then a battalion chief in charge of 
this battalion, to report on its opera- 
tion. He, like his chief, opposed the 
idea. Each captain and lieutenant 
detailed to this particular battalion 
was also against it. What followed 
was that, as far as possible, every 
malcontent and booze-tighter in the 
department wa= transferred into the 
third battalion. The outcome was 
that the system proved impossible — 
and so Chief Kenlon reported. This 
report is used at the present time as 
an argument against the two-platoon 
system. 1 presume it is. in so far as 
Chief Kenlon is concerned, for he 
really is a bright and fully callable 
fellow, well equipped mentally to 
properly Bet forth exactly why t he de- 
partment 's eiliciency was impaired, or. 
at least, would be by the permanent 
adoption Of the two-platoon, forgett- 
ing, perhaps, that you or I had a con- 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



trary version of the trial. As a matter 
of absolute fact, what other decision 
could be expected from the source 
whence it came? Chicago, in the first 
battalion, gave a like test, obtaining, 
in so far as results were concerned, a 
much better written report, particu- 
larly upon efficiency, there being a 
majority and minority report, both of 
which practically favored the idea, but 
it was not adopted for various reasons, 
the principal of which being lack of 
finance. 

This brings us to the very queer con- 
dition connected with all these situa- 
tions, no matter where they may be, 
and that is how chiefs and their 
assistants, along with other details 
made necessary by circumstance, can 
appear before legislative bodies repre- 
senting their side of the argument, 
whereas men in fear of their positions 
or disfavor seemingly have no side, 
either affirmative or negative. 

Past experience has taught that, 
wherever men have taken up arms, as 
it were, for this much-discussed two- 
platoon system or, in fact, any other 
betterment for firemen, he or they 
were duly marked and carried accord- 
ingly, which fact means almost any- 
thing, yet we are in, what is every- 
where termed, a progressive era. In 
spite of prevailing opposition in both 
New York and Chicago, something was 
gained in both places by adopting a 
better "off" schedule, particularly so 
in Chicago, where they have the most 
liberal off-day arrangement in these 
United States, namely, 24 hours every 
third day. Nevertheless, the firemen 
are still hammering along for the two- 
platoon system. New York came 
within an ace of passing a bill this 
spring. Governor Sulzer was about 
to sign it before Commission Johnson, 
Chief Kenlon and fifteen deputy chiefs 
made some impression upon him, for 
he concluded, after their visit, to let 
his law of home rule apply. This, in 
other woids, is a referendum. I anti- 
cipate an ultimate victory along this 
line. Illinois has recently passed a 
bill, a copy of which I append, that no 
employe of a fire department shall be 
compelled to be on duty more than 10 
consecutive hours in the daytime nor 
more than 14 consecutive hours at 
night. This also must go to a refer- 



endum for the people to decide upon. 
Here, particularly in Chicago, has been 
waged a battle royal for the past ten 
years, and whatever betterment has 
been obtained was principally through 
the efforts of George B. Hargan, presi- 
dent of the Illinois Association. Many 
of you heard Hargan speak at our last 
convention in Wausau. He is now on 
pension, having retired December 31, 
1912. Speaking of the two-platoon 
system in Chicago, let us not forget 
the lamented Bassett, who was origi- 
nally the strenuous advocate of such a 
system and who lost his life in the 
performance of a fireman's duty, his 
head being crushed by a falling wall. 
May his soul rest in peace, for he cer- 
tainly had a rough and rugged road to 
travel while pushing the much-abused 
animal— the two-platoon system. The 
fight being made in Chicago, after re- 
ceiving more salary and the best "off" 
in these United States, would indicate 
that this system of two platoons was 
best. Ohio is likewise endeavoring to 
obtain a reduction of hours of labor 
through the legislature. Take the 
average city. It avoids the matter 
almost entirely, which fact makes it 
necessary to appeal, as it were. This, 
of course, is not at all pleasant, but in 
a court of law one has the right of 
appeal. Naturally, in assuming this 
prerogative, one must spend money; 
nevertheless, when expended in this 
way, it is, in my opinion, well inves-ted 
both from our side and the general 
taxpayer. Seattle, in the State of 
Washington, this spring adopted the 
two-platoon system by a vote of the 
people. The only one not affected is 
the chief. And so, all along the line, 
we have that well-defined feeling of 
shorter working hours for firemen. 
Heretofore I have said New York is 
progressive. Yes, we are informed 
they have more motor apparatus than 
any other city in the United States. 
In spite of this wonderful progressive 
spirit and great expenditui e of money, 
our eastern metropolis is far in the 
rear when it comes to increasing de- 
partment efficiency along the shorter- 
hours line, for is not opposition to the 
i two-platoon system a step backward? 
Peculiar to relate, all other city de- 
partments, except the fire boys, are 
given magnificent consideration. The 



police in Milwaukee, who are on three 
shifts a day, have recently received 
five days more furlough, making 15 
days per annum, as well as two 24-hour 
"offs" every month. Engineers and 
firemen in the water department, also 
on three shifts per day, get 15 days' 
furlough annually and one 24-hour 
"off" every eight days. 

(Continued Next Week) 

Efficient High Pressure System. 

The report of the grand jury of 
Venice was a commendation on the 
excellence of the salt water fire pro- 
tection system which has been brought 
to a state of high efficiency this year. 
Fire Chief Hubbard has received a 
letter from William Meeks, foreman, 
and R. E. Wirsching, secretary of the 
grand jury, stating that the inquisto- 

i rial body had found the Venice system 
one of the best in the country and 
entirely adequate. 
A plant belonging to the Abbott 

' Kinney Company works night and day 
keeping a steady pressure in the salt 

: water mains, which are laid in the 
alleys as well as in the streets, enabl- 
ing the firemen to use hydrants on 
each side of a building. In case of 
fire the pressure is automatically in- 
creased until the firemen have a force 
of 320 pounds to the square inch with 
which to fight the flames. Venice re- 
cently bought two of the latest im- 
proved fire trucks patterned after 
those now in use in New York City 
and other eastern cities with which, 
manned by paid firemen instead of the 
volunteer corps, as of old. they can 
reach a blaze within the city limits in 
a few minutes. 

Seattle city officials have made no 
provision for providing relief help for 
(the vacation season in the fire depart- 
ment, and as a consequence all sta- 
tions will be short-handed when the 
regular membersare given theirstatu- 
tory vacation of fifteen days. There 
are 270 men entitled to vacations and 
; fifty-seven of these will be off at a 
'time until all have had their fiftetn 
Hays. 



Phcne Mcintl 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Airent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

"The Wolf" is to be started on a 
week's run in the Alcazar Theatre 
next Monday evening, with Forrest 
Stanley, Bessie Barriscale, Howard 
Hickman and the stock company ap- 
propriately cast. In this dramatic 
depiction of life in the Hudson Bay 
country Mr. Stanley scored one of his 
big hits, which is one of the reasons 
for its revival by the Alcazar manage- 
ment. "The Wolf" introduces phases 
of life and types of character which 
are radically different from those in 
any other work by its talented author. 
Its scenes are laid in Canada's north- 
ern frontier and its people are rug- 
gedly picturesque and primitively 
human. A feature of the play is a 
duel to the death which is one of the 
most intense scenes of its kind ever 
staged. The rivals fight with knives 
and in darkness, and not until the 
victor lights a match does the audience 
discover his identity. Each of the 
three acts calls for realistic staging, 
and the Alcazar's mechanical forces 
can be depended upon to meet all the 
requirements in that respect. 

Empress Theatre. 

The bill opening next Sunday after- 
noon at the Empress will be Max's 
Circus, a real Barnum& Bailey Circus 
in miniature. The company carries 
two carloads of animals and scenic 
equipment and ten leading circus 
artists of Europe. Headline honors 
will be divided with Sager Midgley, 
one of the greatest comedians in the 
United States, presenting his own 
comedy, entitled "Early Morning Re- 
flections." In the cast is Dawn Elton, 
a charming young woman. The Four 
Readings, great gymnasts, will pre- 
sent the act in which actual juggling 
of human beings is featured. Mort 
Sharp, a clever comedian, will enter- 
tain with new songs, stories and satire 
of his own creation. B. Kelley For- 
rest, wIim puts his work over mi the 
order o£ Nat Wills' style of entertain- 
ing, is billed as the "Happy Tramp." 
Lew Manning and Ed Ford, two boys 
who know how to dance. The usual 
added attraction and the Essancee- 
scope will complete a good bill. 

Subscribe for the PACIFIC Fireman 



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buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

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PACIFIC FIREMAN 



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'ACIFI 




IREMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2.00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 

continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



A Letter of Appreciation. 

The following letter will explain itself, and 
we consider it well worth the space it occu- 
pies in this paper, ?or the reason that a Mill 
Valley fireman exerted himself to care for 
firemen from San Francisco helpihg l:o save 
property, and they in turn appreciated the 
kindness shown them: 

San Francisco, Aug. 7, 1913. 

Mr. Chas. Thoney, Care Fire Department. Mill Valley. Cal. 

My Dear Chas.: We are sending you by 
Mr. William H. Brown of the corporation 
yard, a contribution from the following men, 
for the purpose of repaying you in some 
manner for vour kindness to them during the 
late fire at Mt. Tamalpais. We were in 
doubt just what to get you in the way of a 
testimonial, but thought that we would send 
the cash so that you might dispose of it to 
suit yourself. 

We all desire to thank you again for the 
kindness shown us, and you may be sure that 
we all fully appreciate your thougbtfulness. 
Thomas Bulger, J. McGloskey, 

J. O'Rourke, E. Casserly, 

Wm. H. Brown, F. Reckenbeil, 

J. Franchi, J. Van Sooten, 

Wm. Flanagan, W. Crane, 

J. Bohn, J. Malley, 

J. Hayden, W. Gilligan, 

Charles Taylor, J. Driscoll, 

E. Fields, H. Donnadieu, 

W. Shaughnessy, Wm. S. Siewert, 

J. Moholy, J. Feldhaus. 

Yours very sincerely, 
(Signed) Capt. Thos. Bulger, 

Corporation Yard. 

Fire Commissioner Johnson, chairman of 
the citizens' committee for the entertainment 
of delegates to the convenlion of the Interna- 
tional Association of Fire Engineers, to be 
held in New York during the first week in 
September, has raUed $25.U00 for the enter- 
tainment of the visiting chiefs. The commit- 
tee expects that twelve hundred fire chiefs 
from other cities will descend upon New York 
Sept. 1. With them will come wives, daugh- 
ters and many friends Altogether it is esti- 
mated that the convention will attract five 
thousand visitors from out of town who are 
airectly interested in the proceedings of the 
fire chiefs. 



Fire Department Items. 

[From Our Exchanges.] 

Fresno will purchase an auto chemical engine 

Los Gatos trustees are considering the pur- 
chase of chemical fire apparatus. 

Santa Monica, Cal. —The City Council is ad- 
vertising for two modern fire engines. 

Napa councilmen propose to call a bond 
election for the purchase of a new automobile 
fire engine. 

San Mateo trustees will have an election in 
August to vote on a $40,000 bond proposition 
for a new city hall and fire station. 

Santa Ana. —Proceedings have been started 
for a $60,000 bond issue for fire apparatus and 
improvements to the water system. 

Petaluma fire laddies are well pleased with 
the work of their auto fire engine. At a re- 
cent try-out it developed wonderful efficiency. 

The fire chiefs of Southern California left 
Los Angeles August 21st on a Southern Pacific 
special car to attend the convention of fire 
chiefs at Tacoma August 25th. 

Long Beach, Cal.— The City Council has 
read for the first time an ordinance calling 
for installation of a salt water, high pressure 
fire protection system, to cost less than 
$200,000. 

Pomona, Cal. —The city officials are consid- 
ering the proposition of purchasing an auto- 
mobile fire engine and a motor hook and 
ladder truck to replace the old truck now 
drawn by horse. 

Engine No. 2 of the Vancouver (B. C.) Fire 
Department, while on the way to a fire, col- 
lided with an automobile. The horses attach- 
ed to the engine were thrown to the pavement 
but were practically uninjured. 

Los Angeles, Cal. —The budget for the com- 
ing year allows the fire department $772,638, 
which amount includes $200,000 for outlays 
and $500,000 for salaries. The sum of $108,- 
710 is appropriated for a new fire alarm 
system. 

Los Angeles, Cal. — Councilman John W. 
Snowden may go east to attend the National 
Convention of Fire Chiefs to be held in New 
York City September 1st, in ordtr to make a 
thorough investigation of fire alarm systems, 
preparatory to the establishment of a new 
system here. 

Boston.— A flying machine fire department 
for Salem was predicted by Mayor John F. 
Hurley. Fire engines, hook and ladders, hose 
wagons and aerial water towers of the future 
will go through the air on the wings of 
aeroplanes instead of using the city streets, 
according to Hurley's ideas. 

Richmond, Cal., has secured a material re- 
duction in fire insurance rates. The City 
Council has signed a contract for the installa- 
tion of a new fire alarm system, which has 
resulted in a general reduction of from 15 to 
25 per cent on mercantile property and 10 per 
cent on residence property. 



Riverbank, Cal.— The business section has 
been totally destroyed by fire, which origi- 
nated in a restaurant, and the damage is esti- 
mated at $35,000. The fire department was 
handicapped, for though Riverbank has a 
good water system there was no fire hose. 
Mayor Wren of Modesto sent the automobile 
apparatus of his city to the assistance of the 
burning town, and the chemical engine from 
Oakdale was also dispatched. 

Los Angeles, Cal. — Fire Chief Eley states 
that he will install a volunteer fire company 
in Sierra Park. There will be a roster of 
fifteen men, and the equipment will be hand- 
drawn chemical apparatus. A structure 12 x 
12 will be erected to house the equipment. 
This will serve a territory three miles from 
the nearest fire house. There is need for 
several more volunteer fire companies in the 
suburban sections, particularly in the north- 
west and Hollywood districts. 

Los Angeles, Cal, — Engine No. 28, on Fi- 
gueroa street, north of Seventh, is now in 
service. Present equipment includes one 
Gorham motor pumping engine and one com- 
bination chemical and hose wagon, 2,000 feet 
of 2$-inch hose, and twelve men. Both pieces 
of apparatus are automobile-propelled. This 
house is of fire-proof construction and is in- 
tended to also house an automobile 85- foot 
aerial ladder truck in the near future. The 
fire alarm bureau headquarters will be re- 
moved to this station soon. 

Los Angeles, Cal. -Owing to the frequent 
cases of destruction of stores and residences 
by explosions, the police believe that a branch 
of the arson trU6t is operating here. On July 
22 three buildings were destroyed by a terri- 
fic explosion, including the grocery store of 
Ottario Petronaggio, at 605 Clover street, 
who was arrested a few hours after the ex- 
plosion, at a moving picture show. He was 
armed and had his insurance papers in his 
pocket. One of the detectives who worked 
on the case, said: "In the many years we 
have been connected with the police depart- 
ment we have investigated about thirty such 
cases. We do not remember a single explo- 
sion occurring in a store or house which was 
not heavily insured. The police will never be 
able to stop these explosions until insurance 
companies stop paving doubtful claims. It 
has been the practice of insurance companies 
to settle for about sixty eents on the dollar in 
such cases. We will call upon the insurance 
companies and ask them to withhold payment 
of the policies. If they comply with our re- 
quest we feel certain the arson ring will 
abandon Los Angeles." 






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PACIFIC FIKEMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 



At a meeting of the Fire Commission, held 
August 22, the following recommendations 
from the Administrative Committee's report 
were approved by the Board: 

From T. McGovern, driver chemical 4, re- 
questing a leave of absence for 60 days, with 
pay, commencing Aug. 18, with permission to 
leave the city, on account of sickness. Grant- 
ed 30 days. 

From Geo. Frederickson, hoseman engine 
13, requesting a leave of absence for 30 days, 
commencing Aug. 16, with pay, with permis- 
sion to leave the city, on account of sickness. 
Granted. 

From the Board of Public Works, request- 
ing requirements and different pieces of ap 
paratus to be installed in engine houses 12 
and 48. Referred to the chief engineer to 
reply. 

From F. Jordan, truckman truck 10, mak- 
ing application for retirement on pension on 
account of physical disability. Referred to 
Pension Board. 

From the American-La France Fire Engine 
Company, requesting an extension of time of 
60 days on their contract for furnishing 
tractor-drawn motor service hook and ladder 
truck. Granted for a period of 30 days, and 
Mr. R. S. Chapman, representative of the 
American-La France Company, be instructed 
to appear in person before your committee if 
further extension is requested. 

From Daniel Newell, captain engine 13, 
submitting a complaint against Alexander 
Lafferty, stoker engine 13, for being under 
the influence of intoxicating liquor while on 
duty Aug. 17. The testimony taken before 
the committee was conflicting and of such a 
nature that the committee is not satisfied to 
recommend that charges be tiled. The com- 
mittee is satisfied that Captain Newell made 
a correct representation of the facts to it, ■ 
but at the same time his testimony is wholly 
uncorroborated and actually conflicts with 
that of witnesses called by himself. Under 
the circumstances your committee is unable 
to recommend anything but the dismissal of 
the complaint. Your committee further re- 
commends that Captain Newell thinks the 
ends of discipline would be subserved if Laf- 
ferty was transferred to some other company, 
and Mr. Lafferty then expressed his willing- 
ness to go to some other company, which 
transfer was ordered made subject to the 
ratification and approval of the Board. 

From. D. A. Ahern, harnessrnaker, request- 
ing that he lie allowed two and one half day's 
pay while absent from duty at the corpora- 
tion yard. Mr. Ahern appeared before the 
committee and stated that for one-half a day 
he was working in conjunction with the City 
Engineer's office on official business and the 
two days he was absent in connection with 
the bond issue for municipal railroads. Re- 
commend he be paid for one-half day while 
working in conjunction with the engineer's 
oflice, and his application for the two days 
absent in connection with the bond issue for 
municipal ownership of railroads be denied. 



From Barrett & Thomas, attorneys, in re- 
ference to an indebtedness of $110 of A. C. 
Butt, lieutenant engine 8. Mr. Butt appear- 
ed before your committee and promised to 
settle the indebtedness just as soon as he 
possibly could; that he has been under heavy 
strain and is endeavoring to do the best he 
can, and your committee is satisfied that his 
statement is true. Filed. 

From the chief engineer, submitting a re- 
port on the probationary period of Edgar L. 
Coxe, fireman pumping station 1; Conrad W. 
Plitsch, fireman pumping station 1; Frederick 
G. Ernst, engineer engine 42. Recommend 
they be permanently appointed. 

From T. A. Reddall, attorney, submitting 
complaint against A. J. Morrison, driver en- 
gine 19, for failure to pay a debt of $33 due 
the White Sewing Machine Company. Mr. 
Morrison and Mr. Reddall both appeared be- 
fore your committee, and Mr. Morrison said 
he was willing to return the sewing machine 
to the company and forfeit his payments al- 
ready made. Recommend complaint be filed, 
as your committee is satisfied that Mr. Morri- 
son is not guilty of any moral delinquency. 

From D. R. Sewell, acting battalion chief 
district 8, submitting a complaint against M. 
J. Murphy, hostman engine 40, for reporting 
back late from his meal hour and with alter- 
ing the record book of the company. Mr. 
Murphy admitted that he had altered the re- 
cord book and your committee therefore 
recommend that he be penalized to the extent 
of two day's pay. The committee makes this 
recommendation on the recommendation of 
Battalion Chief Sewell, Lieut. Matlock and 
the Chief Engineer, Mr. Murphy being warned 
that if he is guilty of a breach of the rules in 
the future the discipline will be far more 
severe. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the following applications for transfers 
be granted: Frank Powers, from hoseman 
engine 13 to hoseman fireboat 2; Patrick 
Golden, from hoseman fireboat 2 to hoseman 
engine 13. Approved. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, sub- ; 
mitting a complaint against Fred Brown, 
hoseman engine 28, detailed temporarily as 
watchman at the corporation yard, for fail- 
ing to punch time clock at the yard as he is i 
required to do. Mr. Brown appeared before 
your committee and stated that he had re- 
ceived nil instructions to punch the clock 

from Superintendent Bermingham, who hi' 

thought was the proper party to give him 
orders. That Clerk and Commissary Gill 
asked him if he had received instructions to 
punch the clock and he said he had not, and 
does not remember Mr (till telling him to do 
so. Your committee finds thiil there is no 
evidence to show willful guilt on the part of 
Mr. Brown of violation of orders. It was 
evident to the committee that there was a 
lack of discipline at the corporation yard, 
and we therefore recommend that tin- matter 
he sent back to Superintendent Itermingham 
with instructions to investigate and report 
back. 



Portland (Ore.) Fire News. 

[Special Correspondence.] 
Mayor Albee spent one entire day last week 
inspecting the city fire houses. The trip was 
for the purpose of getting acquainted with 
the men and learning the needs of those at 
each station. This is the first time since 
taking office that Mayor Albee has visited 
among the men employed in the Fire Bureau. 
He was accompanied by Chief Dowell. 

Clark E. Gardner has been appointed black- 
smith in charge of the portable blacksmith 
shop which was put in service Aug. 18 in the 

\ Fire Bureau. The wagon is equipped with a 
complete horse-shoeing outfit and will be 
drawn by two trained horses. 
James McGrew, hoseman engine 26, took 

j his life in his hands on the 13th inst. and 
made the jump into the sea of matrimony in 
Vancouver, Wash, by marrying Miss Adeline 

I Hiatt. Here's the very best of good luck to 
you, Jim. If you are as good a husband as 
you are a fireman you will get along fine. 

Seaside, Ore. Quick response on the part 
of the volunteer fire department Sunday saved 
the summer resort from another disastrous 
fire, when an alarm was turned in from the 
Mears Hotel. Some rubbish in an unfinished 
room, a small boy and a lighted candle were 
the preliminary elements. Small damage 
was done. 

Lents, Ore. Through the efforts of Captain 
Hazen the Lents Volunteer Fire Department 
has secured 500 feet of good second-hand hose 
and a new nozzle. This hose will enable the 
company to reach all the business sections of 
the suburb. Two old fire hydrants have been 
replaced with modern ones. 

St. Johns, Ore. Chief of Police Wilson has 
asked the council to install a complete system 
of fire and police alarms throughout the city. 
For the present there is no fire alarm system 
and theonly police signal is a red light flashed 
at night by the telephone operator when help 
is needed. 

The St. Johns Volunteer Fire Department 
has decided to hold a barbecue celebration 
Aug. 31 on the banks of the Willamette river 

just north of St. Johns. The Portsmouth 
Volunteer Fire Company will be their guests. 

For Flowers for all occasions call up Mission 
59«8. J. J. O'Connor, 2750 Mission Street. 

William Sweeney, hoseman of engine 4, 
was married on Wednesday, August 20th, to 
Miss Annie Rodden, daughter of (on Rodden. 
The couple will spend their honeymoon in 
Southern California. 



The Civil Service Commission will appeal 
from Judge Murasky's decision in the Mattock 
case, which requires the certification of three 
names. 



Telephone Douglas 1255 

U. J. BORCK, "" "amok 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

FIREMEN'S V UNIFORMS 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN si lis 

93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



6 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



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151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 






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FLORAL 



Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



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...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and Flowering plants in variety. 

Special bttentioTt given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations, and Designs. 

Ganlening, /•-'/<•. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

T«i RkaCH Nurseiubs, Lake Castro street car to 23rd, or 

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to Douglass and 24th streets. 




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Los Angeles 



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FUNERAL WORK A SPECIALTY 

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NEAR VALENCIA 
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Telephone Dou 8 l., 287 I 



MENS FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



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Phone \ larkel 5417 S 4 N FR A NCISCO 



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Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

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1155 OOI.DEN GATE AVE. 
|Y le phones Park 117 and 11? San Francisco. Cal 



SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



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could be no better investment i han a HOWARD 
Watch, living wiih a HOWARD is the surest way lo 
absorb the accuracy, the punctuality, ar.d practical time- 
saving thai America's successful men denar.d as a mat- 
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The pti.e of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
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al $350 

Admiral Sigpbee has written a linle I k. 

The Lng of the Howard Watch." giving Hie 
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Telephone Wen 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 




VOL. X.-NO. 41 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 30, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



A Shorter Working Day For Firemen. 



By Captain W. E. Brown. Milwaukee. 

Paper Read at Wisconsin Paid Firemen's Association. 
July 24. 1913. 

(Continued from Last Week.) 

The bridge tenders receive more sa- 
lary, 15 days' furlough and two shifts, 
changing from night today shift every 
other week. This, in like proportion, 
is applicable everywhere. Seemingly. 
in the giving out of extras, we, who 
are always ready for any and every- 
thing, from taking horses out of 
ditches to birds and cats from trees, 
as well as facing fire and smoke, must 
patiently sit by and smoke our pipes 
in peace. Really, it is enough to drive 
one into a fit of exasperation. I often 
wonder what the reason is. Perhaps 
we are not sufficiently consistent in 
our demands, or is it because we ask 
too much? Possibly there is a com- 
plication of ideas. The last-named is 
must feasible; for among firemen there 
is. from my own experience, a most 
decided variance of what they want, 
salary or "offs," the first of which, 
seemingly, appeals most. My idea is 
shorter working hours, and along that 
line our efforts should be concentrated; 
for, with shorter working hours, we 
have more pay as a matter of fact. 
Some are afraid that the two-platoon 
system means reduction, less of fur- 
lough, sick ai d injurj \,:i\ . 

Tell me, pray, is that any worse 
than the Compensation Act, which 
gives 66 per cent, of $75(1 for a limited 
period of injury? For the benefit of 
those who are not familiar with these 
facts, Kansas City and Seattle go on 
as before, Omaha stopped the fur- 



loughs but raised salaries, that being 
the original plan. Whether or not it 
has been changed, I am unable to say, 
but rather imagine, from Chief Sal- 
ter's good opinion since its adoption, 
he'd improve on the original plan Let 
us, at least, trust that he has. Shorter 
working hours ora two-platoon system 
for firemen require additional expense, 
most certainly, for more men are need- 
ed, but in a greater proportion thereof 
is the standard of efficiency increased 
simply because your minimum of 
strength is based on sufficient i umber 
of men to properly man and run each 
company at all hours— day and night. 
Of course I will admit that is done 
under present conditions, but many 
and many a time, by reason of fur- 
lougl s, sickness, injury, special detail 
and the like, is the aforementioned 
minimum decidedly small. Going be- 
fore administrative bodies with your 
proposition, the first question asked 
is, as a rule— for this is a commer- 
cialized era, where the dollar prevails 
— what will be the cost of adoption; 
also cost of maintenance? And this, I 
will acknowledge, is perfectly proper, 
for the people ought to know where 
ail of that tax money is going; and, 
believe me, the average city council 
surely spends money, very little of 
which is used for shorter hours — at 
least where the long-suffering firemen 
are concern! d. 

But other places have made the ne- 
cessary provisions without anj great 
difficulty and, inasmuch as our present 
system is faulty, after many years of 
trial, allow me to ask, in all frankness 
and seriousness, why not give the pro- 
gressive idea a chance? 



Prevention of Factory Fires. 



From Report of Jas. P. Whiskeman, Advisory FnKineer 
N. Y. State Factory Investigating Commission. 



Exercise simple and ordinary pre- 
cautionary measures against the out- 
break of fire by the removal of readily 
preventable causes. 

The necessity of removing waste 
materials, cuttings and rubbish from 
the floors of factory buildings and 
storing them in fireproof receptacles. 
All factory floors should be thoroughly 
swept at least twice each day, all 
waste, etc., kept in fireproof recepta- 
cles and removed from the building at 
least once each day or be baled and 
stored in fireproof enclosures. 

Automatic sprinklers should be pro- 
vided in all factory buildings where 
the nature of the work done and the 
materials used may readily cause a fire. 

The necessity of efficiently organ- 
ized fire drills and private fire depart- 
ments equipped with auxiliary fire- 
fighting apparatus. Fire drills in 
connection with afire alarm signal sys- 
tem should be conducted at frequent 
intervals in every factory building, 
with special regard to the exit facili- 
ties, so that if one exit should be cut 
off, the efficiency of the drill and the 
opportunity for escape may not be 
lessened. 

The necessity of proper and suffi- 
cient exit facilities. All factory build- 
ings of two or more stories in height 
should be provided with at least two 
efficient means of exit remote from 
each other. 

The necessity for the enclosure of 
stairways in all factory buildings with 
doors of fire resisting materials. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Civil Service for Portland. 

Promoting city employes for effi- 
ciency only; dividing the city work 
into classifications; fixing examina- 
tions for positions in all departments, 
and fixing a basis by which city em- 
ployes can be promoted or dropped 
from the service, are a few of the re- 
quirements of the chapter on stan- 
dardization of salaries and wages in- 
cluded in the administrative code 
which is being drafted for Portland by 
experts of the New York Bureau of 
Municipal Research. 

The employes are to be classified ac- 
cording to the general character of 
service rendered the city. The classes 
are: Clerical, engineering, fire, in- 
spection, skilled labor, labor, medical, 
operating engineering, police and su- 
pervising service. 

Each class is divided into ranks and 
grades. The rank applies to the special 
kind of service; the grade to the salary 
and efficiency of the employe. 

To secure a position in this service 
civil service examination has to be 
taken and the successful applicant is 
given a position in the lowest grade, 
according to the particular rank. 

To be promoted an employe must 
have served at least six months in the 
grade from which he is promoted. 
The length of time required varies 
according to the classification. This 
promotion is made by the commis- 
sioner in charge of the department on 
the approval by the Civil Service Bu- 
reau of the efficiency record of the 
employe. 

The efficiency record is based on a, 
rating of 80 points known as "nor- 
mal." Four factors have to be taken 
into consideration, ability, efficiency, 
personality and bravery, the last, 
however, applying to only the police 
and fire departments. 

Demerit marks for non-perform- 
ance of duties, insubordination and 
others are to be deducted from the 
"normal." Any commissioner may 
reduce an employe from one grade to 
another of lower salary, although no 
reduction in rank can be made. 

Merit marks are to be added to the 
"normal" for exceptional ability, ef- 
fectiveness, personality and bravery. 
When a promotion is made, all of 
these points have to be taken into con- 



sideration, the selection for a position 
in a higher grade to be made of the 
employe in the lowest grade having 
the highest rating above "normal." 

To secure any promotion to rank 
higher in classification and with a 
higher salary an examination has to 
be taken. 

New York Fire News. 



[Special Correspondence.] 

Early in the morning on Aug. 13, 
Fireman Bertrand Johnson of the tire- 
boat Abraham S. Hewitt was instant- 
ly killed when struck in the head by a 
fire nozzle, which was torn from the 
hose he was handling by the pressure 
of the water. Johnson was directing 
the stream from the fire nozzle on the 
bow of the boat when the immense 
pressure of the water caused the hose 
to burst at the base of the heavy brass 
nozzle. The nozzle flew upward, 
striking Johnson on the head, fractur- 
ing his skull and killing him instantly. 
The Hewitt backed out into the river, 
where the damage to the hose was 
partly repaired. Then, with the dead 
fireman lying on the deck covered by 
a tarpaulin, the boat went back to 
fight the flames. 

Truck No. 286, with Lieut. O'Farrell 
clinging to it, turned a sharp corner 
on its way to the fire, and the fireman 
was flung to the ground. He was 
taken to St. John's Hospital with a 
fractured skull and died in a few hours. 

A firemen's monument, erected in 
memory of New York city's tire- 
fighters who have lost their lives in 
combatting fires, will be unveiled at 
100th street and Riverside Drive, on 
Friday, Sept. 5, at 2 p. m. The me- 
morial has been erected with funds 
raised by popular subscription. When 
this monument is unveiled two marble 
groups symbolizing Duty and Sacrifice 
will be disclosed. On one side of the 
memorial appears this inscription: 

To the Men of the 

Fire Department of the City of New York 

Who Died at the Call of Duty. 

Soldiers in a War That Never Knds. 

This Memorial is Dedicated 

By the People o! a Grateful City. 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Acent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue, Oakland 



Motor Fire Apparatus. 

The National Fire Protection Asso- 
ciation has investigated the subject of 
motor-driven fire apparatus and the 
report resulting is well worth time 
and study. 

The report classifies fire apparatus 
under three main heads: Pumping en- 
gines, hose wagons and ladder trucks. 

The report in part reads as follows: 

"The great majority of automobile 
engines use the same motor to propel 
the machine and to drive its pump, 
but a number of fire departments are 
equipped with motorized steam fire 
engines, either because it was desired 
to provide machines already in service 
with the advantages of motor propul- 
sion or because it seemed inadvisable 
to substitute an unproved gasoline en- 
gine for a proved steam engine. When 
it is now desired to retain steam en- 
gines in service and at the same time 
provide them with power that they 
may be self-propelling the most usual 
and probably the best method is to sub- 
stitute a tractor for the front wheels 
of the engine, though power may be 
applied to the rear wheels or even tow- 
ing by automobile resorted to." 

To insure efficiency the National 
Board of Fire Underwriters has set the 
following standard: An engine must 
be able to deliver 700 gallons per min- 
ute(or whatever its rated capacity nay 
be), at 120 pounds net pump pressuie 
and at least 50 per cent of its rated ca- 
pacity at 2(10 pounds net pressure with 
a maximum suction lift of 10 feet; the 
length of hose lines and sizes of nozzles 
to be such that the above results will 
be obtained, and each test to be of 
one hour's duration. — Underwriters' 

Report. 

Could This be Worked in San Francisco. 



Winona, Minn. -The fire depart- 
ment at midnight answered an alarm 
which took them to the south central 
part of the city, in the zone from 
which an alarm brings out all the men 
and equipment. When the firemen 
returned they found a burglar had 
worked in the deserted central fire 
station. The sleeping quarters were 
raided and many of the fireiren's 
trousers, hanging from the ends of 
their beds, had been looted of their 
purses, which were pretty full, as the 
previous day had been pay day in the 
department. — Fireman's Herald. 



PACIFIC F1KKMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

The Alcazar management will offer 
"Madame Sherry, "a musical comedy, 
commencing with an extra matinee 
next Monday (Labor Day.) A bril- 
liant performance is assured through 
the strength of the company, headed 
by Ralph Herz and Maude Amber. A 
chorus composed of pretty girls, who 
sing melodiously and dance with 
poetry of motion, will contribute 
adornment to the stage pictures and 
volume to the ensemble harmonies. 
And the orchestra is to be considera- 
bly augmented. Without musical em- 
bellishment it would be an entertain- 
ing comedy, and with its melodious 
setting there are few productions to 
equal it. Because everyone has heard 
"Every Little Movement" and the 
other song hits in "Sherry" an im- 
pression is current among those' who 
have not witnessed the play that its 
charm lies mainly, if not solely, in the 
score, while the fact is that the mirth 
qualities of its story are no less en- 
gaging than the music. It is a clev- 
erly-told tale of a man's love for a 
maid — love of the romantic kind that 
is strengthened instead of diminished 
by having to overcome seemingly- 
insurmountable obstacles to smooth 
running. 

Empress Theatre. 

Beginning next Sunday afternoon 
Sullivan & Considine will offer a bill 
of the highest quality. Mons. G. 
Molasso (himself) the greatest of all 
living pantomimic dancers and his 
own companv in an elaborate produc- 
t' m of "La Somnambule" will he the 
feature offering. "The Watch," a 
one-act play will he presented by Chas. 
W. Bowser and his company. Two 
musical comedy favorite-, Jules Ber- 
nard and Florence Scarth, will present 
» rapid-fire dancing and singing turn. 
A real novelty for vaudeville will be 
presented by Lew Palmore, who jug- 
gles hats of every size and style. 
L iciann Lucca, who sings soprano and 
b iritone, will give an exhibition of his 
wonderful voice in classical and popu- 
lar solos. Henry Frey, a character 
in mologlBt, will make his first appear- 
ance in San Francisco as an inebriated 

German who scrambles the English 
language into shreds. Two other 
ad led Empress features and the Ks- 
aarweeacou© makeup a good program. 



Gorham Motor-Propelled Pumping Engines 



SOLD IN CALIFORNIA 




TYPE OF STRAIGHT PUMPING ENGINE 



1 Oakland 1 Straight Pump 

2 Pasadena I Combination Hose & Pump 

3 San Diego I 

4 Los Angeles I 

5 Los Angeles I 

6 Los Angeles 1 

7 San Diego I 

8 San Diego I 



9 San Diego I Combination Hose & Pump 

10 Visalia . I 

I I Bakersfield I " 

1 2 Los Angeles I 

I 3 Los Angeles ... I Straight Pump 
I 4 Los Angeles I Combination Hose & Pump 
1 5 Sacramento I 



Note. — There are more Gorham Motor Propelled Pumping Engines sold and in service in 
the State of California than all other makes combined 

There is a reason. IW MERIT TELLS. ASK THE CITY THAT OWNS ONE 

Gorham Fire Apparatus Company 



SEATTLE 
82 & 84 W. Marion Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Steeet 



LOS ANGELES 
1 223 South Olive Street 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to «^ 
feed it the best lubricant money 

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unless, of course, you are married 
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But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Sole Distributor for the Pnclflc Const S4.1 OnldVn Onto Ave., Snn Francisco 






PACIFIC K 1 K K M A N 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

J AS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

Io whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manaeer 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 
One year, in advance ,$2.00 



ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 

continuous ones. 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



with everything Mr. Eley has said. When 
the streets are wei, over 25 miles an hour is 
in the danger zone, and while your molor may 
he capable of going fiO miles an hour, never 
let your men use it," said Chief Stetson. "I 
find the great problem to be to instruct and 
train drivers who may be depended upon to 
exercise due caution." 

Chief Thos. Davis of Victoria, B. C. , offered 
to show the chiefs his figures proving the 
cheapness of maintaining motor apparatus. 
He said he was discarding horses as fast as 



possible and that not another one would he : for $10,000. 



Department in making up the new htji'uet. 
The commissioner, in his address of welcome 

io ilie delegatesal the fireclm !V < vemion, 

made the announcement. 

"I want the kind that will pump salt waler, 
and I think they will give as good protection 
to the waterfront plants as a fireboat. The 
money for the purchaseof the two new pumps 
will be included in my budget when it is pre- 
sented to the council." 

Tacoma already has one gasoline pump 
among its fire apparatus, purchased recently 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 190K. at the 
rostolhce at San Francisco. Cat. under the Act of Con 
stress of March 3. 1879. 



Pacific Coast Fire Chiefs in Session. 

Seventy-five delegates, representing five 
states and three Canadian provinces and in- 
cluding many fire-fighters of wide experience 
and heroic service, went into session in Ta- 
coma Monday morning at the 21st convention 
of the Pacific Coast Association of Fire Chiefs. 
Mayor Seymour and Commissioner of Public 
Safety Mills delivered addresses of welcome 
to the fire chiefs, when the session was called 
to order at 10:30 in Odd Fellows' Temple, 710 
Pacific avenue. The mayor spoke of the im- 
portance of a fire chiefs' convention and ex- 
tended the delegates the freedom of the city. 
The reply was made by Chief Archie J. Eley 
of Los Angeles. Short talks were also given 
hy Chief Davis of Victoria, Chief Foster of 
Astoria and Chief Haley of San Jose. Geo. 
McAlevy, Tacoma tire chief, said he stood 
ready to give the delegates almost anything 
they asked for in the way of entertainment. 

The roll call showed 79 chiefs, ex-chiefs, 
assistant chiefs and agents in attendance, 
these coming from Washington, Oregon, Cali- 
fornia, Arizona, Idaho. Montana, British Co- 
lumbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan. 

Chief A. J. Elev of Lus Angeles spoke on 
the advantages of motor-driven fire appara- 
tus, laving particular stress on speed limits. 
"Don'l let your men get the speed craze," 
he said. "Pick your men carefully and watch 
them to see that thev are capable of keeping 
their heads. I would recommend that gover- 
nors he put on all motors to limit their speed. 
It is better to go at half speed and get to a 
fire than to go at full speed and end in the 
ditch. I should say cars should not be driven 
faster than 25 miles an hour. Faster than 
that is dangerous, and an accident means 
ruined apparatus and dead men." 

Chief F. L Stetson of Seattle spoke of the 
efficiency of motor apparatus in hilly cities 
like Tacoma and Seattle. He said that such 
cities in purchasing motors should figure on 
sufficient power to overcome the grades. 

"Where a city like ours would require a 
motor of 80 to 100 horsepower, one situated 
on the level would get the same service with 
less than half the power. Speed is all right 
up to a certain point, but I am in sympathy 



purchased for the Victoria Fire Department. 

Assistant Chief Short of Oakland told of 
the situation in his city where a third of the 
men are full pay men and the rest call men. 
He gave figures showing how much quicker 
the full pav men are to get to fires and put 
them out as compared with the call men. He 
said one of his motor pumps there would pass 
seven steam fire engines, horse-drawn, in five 
blocks. 

Business was resumed Wednesday and 
Thursday and the following papers read and 
discussed: 

"Fire Prevention by Legislation as well as 
Education," Chief A J. Eley of Los Angeles. 

"Fire Escapes," Thomas Baird. assistant 
chief of Fresno. 

"Fire Prevention as the Public Sees It," 
E B. Raymond, ex-chief of Olympia. 

"The Importance of Time in the Fire Ser- 
vice, - ' Chief Thomas E. Heath of Saskatoon, 
Canada. 

"The Heitrhts and Areas of Buildings," H. 
W. Bringhurst fire marshal. S*:ittle. 

"Arson." Edward Haley, San Jose. 

CALIFORNIA WELL REPRESENTED. 

Twenty-eight representatives of the Cali- 
fornia fire-fighters arrived in Tacoma Monday 
morning. They traveled by special car and 
had an exceedingly jolly trip. To while away 
the time they organized a traveling govern- 
ment. Chief Small of Oakland was made 
judge; Chief Halev of San Jose, prosecuting 
attorney. C. A. Taber, a fire apparatus re- 
presentative of San Francisco, was tried on a 
charge of transporting dynamite from one car 
to another, and was defended by Chief Walsh 
of Santa Clara. The charge was dismissed 
when the dynamite was proved to be socks, 
but Mr. Taber was not allowed to get off scot 
tree; he was found guilty of bribing the 



A display of fire- fighting apparalus was 
made at 704 Pacific avenue, showing all the 
latest inventions in fire-fighting machines. 

Monday afternoon Commissioner Mills head- 
er] an automobile party that contained the 
wives of a number of the chiefs. They were 
driven to Point Defiance and around the city 
while the men were in convention. At night 
the entire party attended "Over Night" at 
the Princess Theatre, as guests of Manager 
Richards. 

At 7 o'clock Tuesday morning the chiefs 
and their wives left on a special train for 
Ash ford and Mount Tacoma, returning in the 
evening. 

Firemen Honor Actress. 

To Battalion Chief L. G. Holden fell the 
distinction of conveying Stella Mayhew, the 
only regular firewoman in the world and third 
assistant chief of the New Rochelle (N. Y.) 
Fire Department, on a tour of the Portland 
(Ore.) tire fighting equipment. 

Miss Mayhew was sworn into the New 
Rochelle lire Department on June 18 by the 
Mayor and received at that time her chief's 
badge. Miss Mav hew is seldom seen without 
her badge, which is solid gold, the gift of the 
firemen, and which carries an inscription on 
the back from the fire commissioner. 

The appointment was bestowed on Miss 
Mayhew as a tribute for the splendid help 
she had given the firemen in swelling their 
pension fund on two occasions. Should New 
Rochelle become a portion of New York City, 
as it is expected to do in a couple of years, 
the salary carried with the appointment will 
be $2500. 

The day after Chief Mayhew's installation, 
which took place with considerable ceremony, 
a big ice plant caught fire and the new chief 
was regularly notified and answered the call 
n her machine, which she is having repainted 



judge and was chained securely in a cornerof bright red and lettered with N. R. F. D. On 



the car for some time while his companions 
pestered him. 

Great confusion was causee one morning 
because in the night the shoes and socks had 
been switched and the chiefs were forced to 
run about in the bare feet in pursuit of their 
rightful coverings. 

The convention had a mascot. A Catalina 
billy goat had been brought hither, and is 
the property of the wife of Chief Nittinger 
of Santa Monica. 

TACOMA ITEMS. 

Purchase for the Tacoma Fire Department 
of two new gasoline fire pumps, to cost ap- 
proximately $10,000 each, will be advocated 
by Commissioner Mills of the Public Safety 



Iht trip Tuesday Chief Holden took Chief 
Mayhew and her husband. Billie Taylor, to 
visit the Irvington bungalow station, the only 
one of the sort in the country, the Portland 
Heights station, as well as engine houses Nos. 
4, 17 and 13 and the new fire boat David 
Campbell, which Chief Mayhew says is larger, 
with one exception, than any New Yotk has. 



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Meeting of the Fire Commission. 



Roll Call. All present. 

Mayor Rolph and Assistant City Attorney 
Norse in attendance. 

The following recommendations by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee were approved: 

From John T. Nourse, attorney, calling at- 
tention to the injunction against this Board 
restraining it from making appointments 
until three names are certified. Filed. 

From John B. Kenny, hoseman engine 9, 
requesting a leave of absence, without pay, 
for 15 days, commencing Sept. 9, with per- 
mission to leave the state, for the purpose of 
visiting relatives in Nevada. Granted. 

From the chief engineer, reporting having 
assigned probationary members to various 
companies as follows: Thos R. V. Kragen, 
hoseman, to engine 29, Aug. 1; Walter Dan- 
iel Griffin, hoseman, to engine 23, Aug. 1; 
Frank F. Stumpf, truckman, to truck 12, 
Aug. 1; Geo. R. Wheeler, truckman, to truck 
5, Aug. 1; Daniel Feeney, truckman, to truck 
12, Aug. 1; Daniel H. Farley, engineer, to 
engine 17, Aug. 16. Filed. 

From E. H. McKittrick, driver chemical 11, 
requesting a leave of absence, without pay, 
for 30 days, commencing Sept. 5. Granted. 

From A. Katich, submitting a complaint 
against Chas. Shay, hoseman engine 12, for 
failure to pay a debt owing him of $96.60. 
Mr. Shay appeared before your committee, 
and the committee is satisfied that he owes 
the amount as stated, and upon Mr. Shay 
agreeing to paj $10 on account on the 1st. of 
September and a similar amount on the lstof 
October atid $20 each month thereafter until 
the claim is liquidated, all ot' which was satis- 
factory to Mr. Katich, it is recommended that 
said complaint be dismissed. 

From the Bay Cities Photo Company, 1104 
Fulton street, asking permission to make a 
panoramic photograph of each fire house in 
the city with apparatus and men in front of 
the houses. Recommend that the matter be 
taken up by said company with the captains 
of t he various companies and that it be left 
to i he discretion of the captains as to whether 
the pictures <-an be taken as requested. 

From Acting Battalion Chief Matheson, 
district 7, submitting a complaint againet T. 
Gilchrist, truckman truck 7, for using disre- 
spect ful language i«> Acting Captain M. Spell- 
man on July 27. Your committee made an 
investigation of the above matter and is satis- 
fied thai Mr. Gilchrist has been guilty of in- 
subordination and therefore recommends that 
he be fined ' hree days' pay. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the old style Dreger smoke helmets now 
in u e in the depart meni of the one-hour type 
rapacity be replaced with new style helmets 
ot the two-hour capacity type, Approved. 

The following new business was acted upon: 

Resolution temporarily appointing .lames 
F. Cosgrove watchman in the department 

for a period commencing Aug. 21 and | nding 

Aug. :il . Adopted. 

From the chief engineer, requesting that 
immediate steps be taken for the purchase of 



hose and motor-driven apparatus for the de- 
partment for the present fiscal year. Laid 
over until Wednesday 8 p. m. 

Receiving of bids for furnishing three each 
of 65-foot and 50-foot trussed extension lad- 
ders for use in the department. Bids opened 
and laid over one week. 

From John Leckie, hoseman engine 6, re- 
questing action on his certification to the rank 
of lieutenant in the department, made in 
March, 1913. Laid over. 

From John F. Meacham, lieutenant truck 6, 
requesting action on his certification to the 
rank of captain in the department, made in 
March, 1913. Laid over. 

From the Civil Service Commission, certi- 
fying Edward J. Skelly for appointment as 
battalion chief. 

From the Civil Service Commission, certi- 
fying Wm. J. Conniff for appointment as 
captain; Allen Matlock as captain; John F. 
Meacham as captain; John H. Leckie as 
lieutenant; Edward F. Courtney as lieutenant; 
Frederick J. Bowlen as lieutenant. 

From the chief engineer, requesting that 
the Civil Service Commission be requested to 
certify eligibles for appointment to the posi- 
tion of engineer of steam fire engines in the 
department. Approved. 

Mayor Rolph addressed the Board in regard 
to tilling the vacancies in the department and 
offered to arrange a conference between the 
Fire and Civil Service Commissions. 

Attorney Nourse stated that the Fire Com- 
mission could not make appointments to fill 
the vacancies until the Civil Service Commis- 
sion certified three name- for each position, 
and it looked very much as if the Civil Service 
Commission had been guilty of contempt in 
not so doing. 

Portland (Ore.) Fire News. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

Engine 21 unloaded three of her crew at. the 
turn from Stark street to Sixth in responding 
t<i an alarm. Hoseman Bradford's excellent 
grip saved him from taking the spill. The 
boys who were unloaded were Hosemen Hay, 
Wynett and Savoy. Hay received a nasty 
scalp wound and the other two were badly 
bruised. The wagon slopped long enough to 
pick up the wounded, then responded to the 
alarm. The fire was in an express wagon 
loaded with household goods. Chemical 1 did 
the honors. 

The count of the referendum vote taken to 
decide what disposal was to be made of the 
Widows' and Orphans' and Mutual Aid fund 
was as follows: Plan 1, 16] votes; plan 2, 
6 votes; plan 8, 48 votes; plan 4, LM votes. 
Plan l carried with a majority of ill votes. 
'SM votes wen- cast. Aii amendment, to carry, 
must have a majority of the total vote CBBt. 
Plan 1 is to return to the memhers all dues 
and initiation fees paid in and turn the bal- 
ance into the Pension Fund. 

The Oregon City Woolen Mills Company 

gave each member of the Hand a gray llanncl 
shirt, to be used as an undress uniform shirt 
cm I heir trip. The Woolen Mills Company 
was thanked by the boyH and will be thanked 



many a time during the trip when the comfort 
of the light weight, soft collar shirt becomes 
apparent. 

The fireboat Campbell did fine work at a 
fire which destroyed $25,000 worth of property 
and threatened the destruction of the plants 
of the West Side Lumber Company and the 
Portland Lumber Company. The fire was 
reported from the fireboat watch tower and 
the boat responded immediately and had no 
trouble getting water. 

Gresham, Ore. —At a special meeting of the 
local volunteer fire department last week a 
committee was appointed to present a peti- 
tion to the council asking that the city pay 
hospital fees and doctor bills for injuries sus- 
tained by firemen while on duty. The same 
petition has been psesenteo to the council 
before but definite action has never been 
taken. 

The band concert given at the Armory last 
week by the combined Fire and Police Depart- 
ment bands was a great success. The Ad 
Club Quartet were recalled several times. 
Their last encore was a hit. They responded 
wearing helmets and firemen's caps. "I 
want to thank everv one of those people most 
sincerely for their assistance, " said Battalion 
Chief Jay W. Stevens, the manager of the 
band, and to whom the success of the conceit 
is due. "Without them our concert would 
not have been half the success it was. When 
we get to New York and are enjoying our- 
selves to the utmost, we will not forget our 
friends." 

A total of $3500 was realized from the con- 
cert, but this amount is not sufficient to meet 
the expenses of the trip and it is likely that a 
delegation of business men who realize the 
advertising value of the trip to New York to 
attend the International Convention of Fire 
Chiefs will assist in raising the balance needed. 
The band will leave Aug. 27. 

Ashland, Ore. The city fire department, 
heretofore a volunteer one and divorced from 
actual municipal control, has been made by 
ordinance a paid organization in view of the 
introduction of the auto fire truck. Here- 
after there will be a fire chief and an assis- 
tanl, each to receive $75 per month. Four 
additional men will also be at the department's 
service, and these will be paid for the actual 
time worked while lighting fires. A day nil' 
will be occasionally allowed the two chief 
officials, otherwise they are compelled to be 
on duty day and night. 

For Flowers for all occasions call up Mission 
59M8. J. J. O'Connor, 27S6 .Mission Street. 

The lire departments of Oak land, Pittsburg, 
Ann. .cli, Richmond and Martinez were called 
upon last Tuesday nighl to light a million 
dollar tile at Pa\ Point. 



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Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 



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Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



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Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

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Gardening, Etc. 

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Watch, i ivirR with a HOWARD is the surest way to 
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Nut every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD W'alch. 
hind the H' WARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. H*- is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pa> for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the Fac- 
tory, ami a printed ticket at t u ed from the 
17 -jewel idouble roller. In a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold -filled case at $40, to the r.\- 
jewel at $150— and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. 

Admiral Sissl.ee has written a little I k, 

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you' l enjoj II l ""i 1 us a pnsl card. I lept M. 
and we'll send you a copy. 

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VOL. X.-NO. 42 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Pacific Coast Chiefs in Convention. 



(Continued.) 

Chief A. J. Eley of Los Angeles was 
elected president of the Pacific Coast 
Fire Chiefs' Association at an extra 
session held in the City Council cham- 
bers Wednesday night. Chief J. J. 
Marsh of Bellingham was elected first 
vice-president, Chief George McAlevy 
of Tacoma, treasurer, and Fire Mar- 
shal Harry W. Bringhurst of Seattle 
was re-elected secretary, a position he 
has held several times since his first 
election to the post in 1898. 

The next convention will be held in 
1914 at Victoria, B. C. 

The following were elected state 
vice-presidents: 

Alberta — T. G. Lauder, Edmonton. 

British Columbia— J. A. Findlay, 
North Vancouver. 

California— George E. Wallace, Mo- 
desto. 

Idiho— J. H. O'Rourke, Coeur 
d'Alene. 

M intana— E. F. Loffnes, Missoula. 

Oregon — D. F. Keating, Marshfield. 

Washington — A. B. Hendrie, Sno- 
homish. 

It was decided to arrange the dates 
of the next convention to allow plenty 
of time for those chiefs who will go 
from Victoria to the next national 
convention, as several are doing this 
year. 

The chief topics of Wednesday's dis- 
cussions were heights and areas of 
buildings, and the construction of 
chimneys. It seemed to be the con- 
census of opinion among the chiefs of 
the larger cities that sky-scrapers are 
hopeless as far as fire protection is 



concerned unless they are equipped 
with adequate automatic sprinkling 
devices. Chief F. L. Stetson of Seattle 
said that should a fire break out in one 
of the upper floors of the new 42-story 
Smith building there, he trusted it 
would burn down to where his firemen 
could reach it. An able paper on the 
subject was read by Fire Marshal 
Bringhurst of Seattle, secretary of 
the convention. 

"Two of the most important 
branches of the study of fire preven- 
tion are those relating to the hazards 
of heights and areas," said Mr. Bring- 
hurst. "It cannot be said that either 
has kept pace with advanced ideas in 
construction, for in every city are 
buildings which stand as proof that 
the contrary is true. Very little con- 
sideration has been given to the con- 
servative advice of those who viewed 
these subjects in the light of expe- 
rience. Tall buildings are regarded 
as such valuable advertisements that 
any city will welcome and encourage 
the man who desires to erect one, and 
we need not be surprised if it changes 
the building ordinance to suit his 
pleasure. 

"Fortunately, the excessively tall 
buildings are as yet used only for 
office purposes and are therefore cut 
up into small rooms. Their contents, 
while combustible, are well distributed 
and do not make fires that get beyond 
the firemen's control. Since our 42- 
story building was started, our council 
has determined to submit for a char- 
ter amendment a limit of 200 feet for 
the height of all buildings hereafter 
erected. One hundred and fifty or 
even 100 feet would be better. As 



for areas, all building ordinances 
should classify more on heights from 
the ground and upon possible occu- 
pancies." 

Mr. Bringhurst urged the use of 
basement pipes for quenching fires in 
the first floors of buildings. He said 
he and Chief Stetson did not hold 
them superior to sprinklers, but very 
effective for killing basement blazes 
when a start might mean the shooting 
of flames up an elevator shaft or stair- 
way to other floors. 

The matter of proper fire escapes 
was discussed at Thursday morning's 
session. 

Chief Otterson, Napa, Cal., de- 
scribed an inclosed device now in use 
in an insane asylum in his city. Dur- 
ing a recent experiment. Chief Otter- 
son said, 1500 inmates left the build- 
ing in two minutes and twenty-five 
seconds. The escape is constructed 
inside the building and is a spiral 
chute. 

Chief Long then protested against 
the existing state fire escape laws, 
which, he declared, were a hardship 
on the proprietor of the small hotel. 
He said the requirements of the state 
hotel inspector are for an escape too 
elaborate for the small hotel man. 
As soon as Chief Long closed his re- 
marks Chief Otterson sprang to his 
feet and in a loud voice declared that 
fire escapes could not be constructed 
too elaborately. 

"My mother and my brother were 
burned to death in a Seattle hotel fire 
just because the building was not 
equipped with proper escapes. We 
are here to devise means of public 
safety and not to form plans to save 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



hotel men money. They are all out 
for the dollar. If they had their way 
they would leave fire escapes out of 
the question altogether. The escapes 
cannot be too elaborate. The poorer 
the construction of the house, the 
better the escapes should be." 

There was a momentary catch in 
Chief Otterson's voice as he spoke of 
the disaster which overcame his fami- 
ly, and all of the delegates were visi- 
bly affected. When he resumed his 
seat he was applauded for several 
minutes. 

The convention then went on record 
as endorsing the enclosed style of 
fire escape. 

Chief Long cast his vote on the 
affirmative side with the rest of the 
delegates and the motion passed 
unanimously. 

Discussion and apparent general ad- 
vocacy of high pressure water systems 
for fighting fire formed the principal 
topic at the afternoon session. 

The salt water main system and 
high pressure topic was introduced by 
Chief Geo. A. Hubbard of Venice, 
Cal., who told of the salt water sys- 
tem in that city. Chief Nittinger of 
Santa Monica, Cal., followed with a 
description of the disastrous fire at 
that town which was checked by the 
salt water system of Venice. 

Chief F. L. Stetson of Seattle asked 
as to the efficiency of salt water 
streams, and told of the present water 
system and reservoirs in Seattle. 

Chief Shrewsbury of Long Beach, 
Cal., told about the plans of that 
place, which is about to hold a bond 
election for a high pressure system. 

Chief Short of Oakland, Cal., told 
of the salt water system there and 
said that salt water w-as more efficient 
than fresh in fighting fires, but dam- 
aged goods more. 

Chief Culver of Raymond, Wash., 
told of the system there. 

The question of durability of pipes 
carrying salt water then arose, it be- 
ing supposed that salt water corrodes 
the pipes so that their life is short. 

Chief Hubbard of Venice said the 
pipes laid there in 1905 are still in use 
and in excellent condition. He also 
said that it had been proved so far 
that the high pressure system meant 
an annual saving of $6000 a year over 



the use of steam fire engines and a 
saving of $2400 over auto engines. 

A communication was received from 
the National Board of Underwriters 
requesting that the chiefs consider 
the question of chimneys. To bring 
the question before the convention, it 
was moved that it be the sense of the 
convention that a chimney of four 
inches thickness of brick with a suita- 
ble terra cotta lining be fixed as 
standard. This brought about a great 
deal of discussion and recitals of ex- 
periences, various chiefs speaking of 
the common thickness of chimney 
walls and local regulations. The mo- 
tion carried. 

Proper legislation for cleaning and 
dyeing establishments and methods of 
regulating the storage of gasoline 
were discussed in a paper written by 
Harry C. Cantler, Tacoma fire mar- 
shal. Mr. Cantler illustrated a talk 
following the fire Wednesday in the 
Clinton block, caused by a Japanese 
pressing a coat which had been clean- 
ed with gasoline contrary to warning 
given him because he had not followed 
the city ordinance of having his gaso- 
line tank buried underground. 

The secretary read a paper on "Fire 
Escapes," written by Chief Thomas 
Baird of Fresno, and another by ex- 
Chief E. B. Raymond of Olympia on 
"Fire Prevention as the Public 
Sees It." 



Pasadena Annual Report. 

A. M. Clifford, chief of the Pasadena 
(Cal.) Fire Department, reports that 
the number of fires during the fiscal 
year ending June 30th were 147. with 
a total fire loss amounting to $43,515. 
The value of the property at risk was 
$1,657,340, which was covered by in- 
surance amounting to $801,975. The 
inventory of the property of the de- 
partment shows the value of engine 
houses and lots to be $61,000; equip- 
ment, $61,400; fire alarm system, 
$12,000 and hydrants, $19,000. The 
citV has decided to advertise for bids 
for one aerial auto truck and two 
auto combination chemical and hose 
wagons. The two new auto combina- 
tions are expected to cost approxi- 
mately $5,000 each, while the cost of 
the aerial ladder truck will probablx 
be about $10,000. 



Fire Prevention by Legislation. 

Any plan for preventing loss of life 
in burning buildings that does not pro- 
vide for the extinguishment of all fires 
as soon as discovered, regardless of 
the height of a building, is absolutaly 
worthless. Making "stoves" of build- 
ings by constructing them of fireproof 
materials will not remove the danger 
from fire to the occupants, or to their 
contents when combustible. The most 
important factors of the fire problem 
of the present day are the large undi- 
vided floors of workrooms and the 
presence of combustible materials to 
feed fires. If small fire areas are not 
made compulsory by law, the only 
positive safeguard against loss of life 
and property is complete equipment 
for extinguishing fires before they 
have a chance to spread.— Insurance 
Field. 

Fire Protection at Exposition Grounds. 

Chief Murphy has written a letter to 
C. C. Moore, president of the Panama- 
Pacific International Exposition, call- 
ing attention to defects in the plans for 
fire protection in the grounds. 

There are eight 40-gallon "Bsdper" 
chemical enginesdistributed al out the 
grounds, each equipped with fifty feet 
of | hose. Three auxiliary fire alarm 
boxes in the Service Building are con- 
nected by telephone to all parts of the 
grounds. There are twenty -four 
"Badger" 2£-gallon extinguishers in 
the Service Building and six hose reels, 
each of the latter equipped with 50 feet 
of lj-inch linen fire hose, connected to 
Spring Valley Water Company mains 
with a pressure of seventy pounds. 

The low pressure water mains are 
now being laid about the grounds. As 
fast as a section is completed it is filled 
with water and available for use of the 
fire department. 

Two thousand feet of hose in two of 
the San Francisco Fire Department 
wagons are kept on the grounds in 
case of need, and one horse-drawn 
chemical and crew are housed on the 
grounds. 






Phone Merrill 44-»7 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Aprent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

The Alcazar's production of '"Ma- 
dame Sherry" is announced to run a 
second week, with an extra matinee 
Tuesday (Admission Day) and the ad- 
vance sale of seats presages another 
series of crowded audiences. For this 
the responsibility is evenly divided 
between the fame of the comedy itself 
and the excellance of its interpreta- 
tion by Ralph Herz, Maude Amber 
and their stage associates. The 
augmented orchestra has contributed 
in no small degree to the entire suc- 
cess. Mr. Herz as Theopilus Sherry 
has exceeded the most sanguine ex- 
pectation of those who were prepared 
to greet a fun-maker. Miss Amber's 
former popularity has been renewed 
by her impersonation of the Irish 
housekeeper in '"Madame Sherry," 
and the reception tendered to her at 
each performance is spontaneous, and 
enthusiastic. That Louise Brownell's 
long absence from this city did not 
lessen her in favoritism has been de- 
monstrated applausively. The other 
principals — Louis Meredith, Laura 
Vail, Bobby Woolsey, Clarence Lyd- 
ston and Bert Wesner deserve all the 
nice things that have been said about 
them by press and public. 

Empress Theatre. 

Beginning next Sunday afternoon 
Sullivan & Considine announce "The 
Girls and The Jockey," with R. N. 
Cory, Vincent Erne and eight people 
in the cast, most of whom are south- 
ern beauties. Ben Ryan and Hen- 
rietta Lee, "The Somewhat Different 
Mirthmakers;" Mae Francis, the girl 
who made Philadelphia sit up and 
take notice; "The Sunshine Girl," a 
dainty miss with a sweet and pleasing 
contralto voice and wearing georgeous 
gowns, making five changes of cos- 
tume; two blackface comedians, Evans 
and Vidocq; a genuine novelty called 
"Paint-o-graph Spectacle," presented 
by The Lelands; Walker and III pre- 
sent a pretty little playlet entitled 
"Just a Girl; Frederick L. Gerke & 
Co, present "One Christmas Evr," a 
dramatic sketch; the S. & C scope 
and the Empress Special Motion Pic- 
tures of the patrons complete an ex- 
cellent bill. 



The Pacific Fireman $2.00 a year. 



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SOLD IN CALIFORNIA 



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1 Oakland . . . . . I Straight Pump 9 San Diego I Combination Hose & Pump 



2 Pasadena 

3 San Diego 

4 Los Angeles 

5 Los Angeles 

6 Los Angeles 

7 San Diego 

8 San Diego 



Combination Hose & Pump 10 Visalia 

I I Bakersfield 



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1 2 Los Angeles I 

I 3 Los Angeles ... I Straight Pump 

1 4 Los Angeles I Combination Hose & Pump 

1 5 Sacramento I 

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the State of California than all other makes combined 

There is a reason. BT MERIT TELLS. ASK THE CITY THAT OWNS ONE 

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To whom all checks and money orders should 

he made payable. 

rL_G^PRESTON Business Manager 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

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Six months " j^nn 



ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially largeand 

continuous ones. 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postofficc at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



Motor Hook and Ladder Trucks for the 
N. Y. Fire Department. 

A recent issue of "The Chief" a New York 
weekly published in the interests of the pub- 
lic service, contains the following paragraph 
' relative to gasoline motor two-wheel front 
drive aerial turntable hook and ladder trucks 
that will within the near future be added to 
the fire-fighting equipment of that city. 

"Chief of Construction Demarest went to 
Elmira last week and gave one of the new 
auto trucks a test. He recommended a few 
small changes which the American-La France 
Company, who are making the trucks, will 
comply with. These trucks are the first 
straight gasmot.ir driven trucks in the de- 
part ment. Two are expected by Sept. 26, 
twelve about Nov. 1st." 

In all there are to be twenty-five pieces of 
this apparatus furnished by the American- 
La France Company to New York City. The 
same concern has recently completed deliv- 
ery of 28 second size Metropolitan steam fire 
engines to the same customer, each equipped 
with gasoline motor two-wheel front drive. 

Fire Chiefs and Fire Losses. 

It isn't the fault of the fire chiefs that the 
fire losses of the United States are several 
limes as great per capita as they are in 
E n.,pe. It is admitted that the fire depart- 
ments of this country are far superior in 

'• a »d equipment to those of Europe. 

Our heavy per capita losses are due to tem- 
porary construction and to national careless- 
ness. We have so much and get wealth so 
easily tiiat we do not conserve what we have 
as they do in Europe. Of course, a good deal 
of the loss is due to the fact that in pioneering 
we put up structures that are not fireproof or 
anywhere near that condition. 

T.i ■ effi :iency of our fire departments is 
high. Tlte men are finely trained and are 
assisted with modern appliances. They are 
transported to fires with a rapidity that star- 
tles European visitors. But, with all that, 
our losses per capita are so far in excess of 
those of Europe that we may well give the 
closest attention to the counsel of the lire 
chiefs lately in session in Tacoma on ways to 
prevent fires and reduce the enormous losses. 
— Tacoma Ledger. 



Department of Public Safety. 

Dayton, Ohio, Aug. 25, 1913. 

Mr. George F. Brown, Captain Engine Co. No. 39. 2136 
Geary St.. San Francisco. Cal. 

Dear Sir: — His Honor, the Mayor, the Di- 
rector of Safety MaysDodds and myself have 
just recently completed the final apportion- 
ment of funds contributed for the relief of 
Dayton firemen who sustained losses in the 
recent flood in our city. 

Through the generosity of members of va- 
rious fire departments, or their kindred or- 
ganizations throughout the United States, 
they were able to recoup nearly twenty per 
cent of their losses. 

It is indeed most gratifying that there 
should be a bond of friendship, a bond of af- 
fection between firemen, whether they live 
in the same city or in different cities. Putt- 
ing flowers on the grave shows to the world 
ynur regard for a friend, but to aid a com- 
rade in distress we create for ourselves a 
memorial that will be lasting. 

In conclusion, permit me, on behalf of the 
members of our department to extend to the 
members of the Widows' and Orphans' and Mu- 
tual aid Associations of your department our 
sincerest gratitude for their noble sacrifices 
in contributing to our aid, the memory of 
their faithfulness to us during distress will 
always be sweet to cherish. 

With the kindest wishes for the future 
prosperity of your association and the mem- 
bers of the San Francisco department in gen- 
eral in every good thing, I remain, 
Yours very truly, 

Frank B. Ramby, 

Chief Fire Dept. 

Nothing Bu t Ca relessness. 

Hayashi. a Japanese, was pressing a coat. 
Unaware nf the fact that the coat had 
matches in one pocket, he let his hot iron 
rest upon the pocket a moment. There wae 
a flash of flame as (he matches were ignited 
and the gasoline-covered garments caught 
fire. The flames shot into Hayashi's face 
burning him fright fullv. Instead of running. 
the Japanese, par i lly blinded, attempted to 
beat the fire out. He threw the coat on the 
floor and jumped on it. Pieces of burning 
cloth were scattered in all directions One 
tiny, flaming piece fell into a large gasoline 
tank. Instantly there was a terrific explo- 
sion and Hayashi was thrown to the floor. 
He was lying, partially stunned, on the floor 
of the burning room when other Japanese 
workers, attracted by the explosion, found 
him. 

The injured man was carried to a nearby 
drug store and his wounds temporarily 
dressed. 

When the gasoline tank exploded gasoline 
was thrown against the side of the adjoining 
buildings. Instantly flames reached the gaso- 
line-covered sections of both frame struc- 
tures. Before the fire apparatus arrived, 
the flames had spread to all sections of the 
two buildings. 

Three lines of hose were run to the rear 
and one in front. In less than 20 minutes the 
fire was under control, but had caused a loss 
of $40,000. 



Fire Department Items. 

[From Our Exchanges.J 

Lodi, Cal., has received a new combination 
auto chemical engine. 

The Salt Lake City Commission has agreed 
to an increase of salaries in the Are depart- 
ment. 

Huntington Beach. — Election will be held 
soon to vote bonds, which will include $5000 
for up-to-date equipment. 

Santa Ana.— Special election will be held 
September 12 for voting $12,000 for equipping 
the fire department with an auto fire wagon. 

Colfax, Wash., has added to its fire-fighting 
apparatus. An auto fire truck is to be in- 
stalled and also an automatic fire alarm 
whistle. 

Sawtelle. — A 50-horsepower chassis has 
been secured and fitted up to carry chemical 
tank, ladders, axes, ceiling hooks and 10U0 
feet of hose. 

The City Council of Colfax, Wash., has de- 
cided to install modern fire apparatus. It 
will immediately purchase an auto fire truck 
and other equipment. 

The new fire truck ordered for the Van- 
couver Fire Department was tested recently. 
The engine pumped 300 gallons per minute 
thro' 1000 ft. of hose. The truck weighs six 
and one-half tons and can develop 129 horse- 
power with a speed of forty miles an hour. 

The firemen's band of Portland is at New 
York City, attending the fire chiefs' conven- 
tion being held there. On the way East the 
band stopped at various cities and gave public 
concerts. Chief Dowell of the Portland Fire 
Department is also attending the convention. 

The Los Angeles Firemen's Relief Associa- 
tion has a membership of 357 with $8,457.41 
in the treasury. A special election was held 
July 19 which resulted in discontinuing the 
association physician and increasing the 
funeral benefit. The Los Angeles Needy 
Widows' and Orphans' Fund has a balance on 
hand of $4,638.05. 

The Los Angeles Fire Commission has ended 
a dispute of many months' standing, by re- 
quiring that a new examination should be 
held for the position of superintendent of the 
fire alarm and police telegraph systems, and 
the date has been fixed for September. It 
will be recalled that Paul J. Ost of San Fran- 
cisco headed the list at the former examina- 
tion, but that the city council has repeatedly 
refused to appoint him, there being some dis- 
pute on technicalities. The commission an- 
nounces that Ost will be permitted to take 
the present examination if he sees fit. 



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Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

The following recommendations by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee were approved: 

From the chief engineer, stating that Mr. 
Buckley had been detailed from the city en- 
gineer's office to the corporation yard to 
prepare drawings on the proposed construc- 
tion of the water towers. Filed. 

From A. Isaacs, lieutenant engine 5, re- 
questing a leave of absence for 15 days, with 
pay, commencing Sept. 1, with permission to 
leave the city, on account of sickness. 
Granted. 

From A. Engleke, captain engine 12, re- 
questing a leave of absence, with pay, for 30 
days, commencing Sept. 1, with permission 
to leave the city, on account of sickness. 
Granted. 

From Batallion Chief George Bailev, sub- 
mitting complaint against George Wheeler, 
truckmau truck 5, for sleeping in on a still 
alarm. Your committee made an investiga- 
tion of this matter and is satisfied that Mr. 
Wheeler missed the above mentioned alarm 
on account of illness and therefore recom- 
mends that the complaint be dismissed. 

From Battalion Chief W. A. Cook, district 
10, submitting report of Captain Wm. Danehy, 
fireboat 1, to the effect that he was not no- 
tified of a fire burning across the bay by the 
members of his company who were on watch 
at the time. Your committee made an in- 
vestigation of this matter and thought it un- 
necessary from the evidence adduced to do 
other than admonish the members of the com- 
pany concerned to be more careful in the 
future 

From Acting Battalion Chief Jos. Capelli, 
district5, reporting death of a horse while 
responding to an alarm. Filed. 

From the chief engineer, submitting a re- 
port of Wm. J. Hensley, Iruck 3, regarding 
an injury received hy Truckman T. Henne- 
berry on August 3rd last, and subject neglect 
to enter the same in the company journal. 
Your committee made an investigation of 
this mat ter and does not think it necessary 
to do other than adminish the officers to be 
more careful in the future in the manage- 
ment of their house. 

From Battalion Chief J. J. Conlon, sub- 
mitting a report on the failure of Lieutenant 
J. F. Meacham to report back promptly at 
the expiration of his meal hour. Lieutenant 
Meacham appeared before your committee 
and admitted that Ire was one hour and 55 
minutes late in reporting back to his compa- 
ny after his meal hour, and your committee 
request that the matter refer back to the Ad- 
ministrative Committee Sept. 11. 

From Harry Loughran, hosrman engine 37, 
requesting that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence, without pay, for 15 days, commencing 
October 1st, with permission to leave the 
state. Granted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS, 

Consideration of bids for one or more 
motor-driven gasoline tractors. Contract 

awarded to American La France Fire Engine 

Company. Price $5, 150. 



Consideration of bids for furnishing, con- 
structing and installing a complete electric 
starter and ligting system for automobile 9. 
Contract awarded to Guarantee Battery Co. 
Price $411.70. 

Specifications for auto hose wagons, trac- 
tors and squad wagons were adopted and bids 
called for. 

Pacific Coast Fire Chiefs in Session. 



CONVENTION NOTES. 

Chief Eley left Thursday for New York to 
attend the National Convention of FireChiets, 
and will visit the works of the American-La 
France Fire Engine Company at Elmira, 
New York. 

Secretary Harry Bringhurst, Fire Marshal 
of Seattle, was presented with a handsome 
traveling bag bo the delegates as a token of 
their appreciation of his long services for the 
association. 

The fire chiefs installation was no pink tea 
party, but it might have been a suffragets' 
meeting in London. It consisted mainly of 
two men leading the new officer by the arm 
about the room twice while the onlookers 
vigorously tried to stamp down the city hall 
floor and clapped calloused hands together 
until it seemed like the staccato notes of an 
auto's engine. 

Even Secretary Harry Bringhurst was 
yanked up from his chair and forced to take 
the "walk." Fire Chief McAlevy ofTacoma, 
the treasurer, did not get off so easy. Four 
men grabbed the heavy victim by the shoul- 
ders and legs and carried him twite around 
the room, while the chiefs emphasized their 
approval. 

Chief D. Walsh of Santa Clara, Cal., was 
singled out as the "goat" for the sacrifice. 
The lights were put out and he was compelled 
to crawl around the table on his hands and 
knees. 

On Wednesday Tacoma's $11,000 gasoline 
pumping engine was taken to the city dock at 
Fifteenth street for a pumping aemonstra- 
tion after the afternoon session, and after 
the evening session a searchlight demonstra- 
tion was given the chiefs by C. A. Taber of 
San Francisco. 

Topics which are to be considered at next 
year's convention in Victoria were suggested 
before the meeting adjourned as follows: 

Revival of persons who are suffocated; re- 
vival of persons who are suffocated by gas; 
first aid for burned persons; wooden water 
mains; electrolysis; sky lights and elevators. 

Resolutions were adopted on the deaths of 
Henry Smith, ex-chief of the Koslyn. VVii.sh,. 
fire department, who committed suicide May 
9, 1918, and J. T. Woollomes, chief of the 
Whitiier, Cal., department, who died in May; 
also thanking the various officials who had 
entertained the chiefs during their stay in 
Tacoma. 

For Flowers for all occasions call up Mission 
50*8. J. J. O'Connor, Z756 Mission Street. 

Our usual Portland letter failed to arrive 
this week. 



International Association Fire Engineers 

As we go to press the chiefs are in session 
in New York City. The Fireman's Herald 
of August 30th, introduces tous^ seventy past 
and present chiefs who have helped to make 
the organization what it is to-day. The pro- 
gram, as prepared, follows, and inasmuch as 
Commissioner Johnson has at his command 
$35,000 to entertain the visitors to this con- 
vention, it promises to be a record breaker in 
more ways than one. 

TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION. 

Motor Apparatus, its durability, efficiency 
and economy of operation — Chief A. V. Ben- 
nett, Birmingham, Alabama. 

Fire insurance and its relation to incen- 
diarism—Chief John Kenlon of New York; 
Commissioner Joseph Johnson, New York; 
Frank Lock, Manager Atlas Insurance Com- 
pany, Ltd., New York. 

British Motor Fire Engines— Arthur Regi- 
nald Dyer, Assistant Chief, Fire Brigade, 
London, England. 

Fire Prevention and Uniform State Fire 
Marshal Laws— Thos. J. Ahearn, State Fire 
Marshal, Albany, N. Y. 

The Gasoline Motor Pumping Engine, its 
defects and cost of operation and mainten- 
ance—Charles S. Demarest, Chief of Con- 
struction, Fire Department, New York. 

Inspection of Buildings and Contents, by 
Uniformed Members of Fire Departments- 
Chief H. C. Bunker, Cincinnati, Ohio; Com- 
missioner W. N. Cash, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The Two Platoon-Chief F. L. Stetson, 
Seattle, Wash.; Chief John C. Egner, Kan- 
sas City, Mo.; Chief Charles A. Salter, Oma- 
ha, Neb. 



Santa Ana will purchase fire apparatus. 

San Leandro is taking of purchasing up-to- 
date fire apparatus. 

Napa is talking of calling a bond election 
for the purchase of an auto fire engine. 

King City, Cal., received bids for a hook 
and ladder truck for the fire department. 

Gilroy.Cal., will purchase a motor-propelled 
combination chemical engine and hose wagon. 



Pasadena will purchase an aerial motor 
truck and two automobile chemical fire 

engines, 

The good showing made by the Spokane 
Pire Department in building its new automo- 
bile equipment, in which about $2500 was 
saved <>n Ehe coal of one machine, has led the 
city council to increase the pay of several ttf 
the mechanics in the department. 



Telephone DougUa 1255 

U. J. BORCK, THI: TAILOR 

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MOTOR fire: apparatus 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



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FLORAL 



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ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to fVcdding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decoration* and Designs*. 

Gardening. Etc. 

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To Kkach NtmsEiilES. take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

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to Douglass and 24th streets. 



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Sacramento 



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Telephone Douglas 2871 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

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77 THIRD STREET 

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Watch. Living with a HOWARD is the surest way lo 
absorb the accuracy, the punctuality, and practical time- 
saving thai America's successful men demand as a mat- 
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Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch Is fixed at the- fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attached— from the 
17-jewel (double roller) in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at $40, to the 23- 
jewel at $150— and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. 

Admiral Sigsbee has written a little hook. 
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record of his own Howard in the V. S. Navy. 
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T. I-I. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLE.R ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



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M. It. C. V. S. 

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U2JU~^S^ /MA-^TF^ 




VOL. X.-NO. 43 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1913. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



WHO WILL BE THE FIRST "FINNEGAN." 



When Chief Stetson of Seattle told 
the chiefs in convention at Tacoma 
that in case a fire broke out in the 42- 
story building in Seattle he trusted it 
would burn down to where his firemen 
could reach it, he evidently had not 
read the story of "Finnegan," by John 
A. Moroso, in American Magazine. 
The entire story is interesting, but 
particularly so is the following: 

The fire chief ordered a sixty-foot 
aerial ladder sent up from the heaviest 
of his modern trucks. The tip of I his 
ladder was thrown to one side of a 
window on the sixth floor. 

"Is Finnegan here?" asked thechipf. 

A well-knotted little man, with a 
face of tight parchment and eves that 
were like two new agates, small and 
brifrht, stepped from the crowd. 

"Peel off, Finnegan," the chief or- 
dered. 

The little man slipped from his coat, 
turned his helmet as he looked aloft 
and saw the burning jets at the win- 
dows and then, as he took a second 
glance and measured the great 
Stretch upward that he would have 
to clinili. he squatted in the watery 
highway and yanked off his boots. 

A great hank of thin but strong rope 
had been secured and this Finnejran 
m de fast about his waist. The only 
oi her I hinji I e \\ ould t; ke aid i w ith 
him was a big jack-knife, which was 
made fast, to his belt with a stout bit 
of twine. 

Two men ran up the sixty-foot ae- 
rial, each taking a scaling ladder. At 
the third rung from the top the firal 
of these men pushed up his lander to 



its full length and then smashed it 
over the sill of a window on the sev- 
enth floor. He pulled it far over to 
the right hand corner and crowded 
over to one side of the aerial as Fin- 
negan came scampering up like a 
monkey. It was a one-man job. 

A giant searchlight blazed the way 
for the little Irishman, who seemed 
like a fly sticking to the wall as he 
paused at the top of his first ladder 
and began shoving the second above 
him. 

The firemen below held their breath 
as they saw the top ladder's hook take 
a grip on the window of the eighth 
floor. Finnegan did not move until 
the gas jet of the seventh story win- 
dow flickered and drew in. Then he 
scrambled upward with the agility of 
a trick performer, which he was. He 
was obscured for a moment, when a 
great puff of blue flame shot from the 
window, but the watching firemen 
saw the lower ladder moving upward 
and they knew that he was safe and 
still working. 

Could he make it? Could he clear 
each window between the eighth and 
the twenty-fifth floors? Would his 
tight lil lie muscles, would his lungs, 
his nerve, his luck hold out over 
that long, fire-belied, perpendicular 
stretch ? 

Finnegan passed the twelfth floor. 
Eight tin es he had w atched his chance 
and had scurried across ihe windows 
of hell, His helmet did not shine so 
brightly as it did at his start. He 
was passing Ihe zone of efficiency of 
the searchlight, as he had lot g passed 
the field of opera I ions of the other tools 
oi I he men of his craft. The chief 



never lowered his head. With a pair 
of night glasses he watched every 
move of hand and foot, every bend of 
the swaying scaling ladders, and 
when one of them swung with the in- 
creasing wind he found himself run- 
ningover in his mind little prayers for 
aid and comfort that he had thought 
lost with a forgotten childhood. 

The foreman of the net crew stood 
beside the chief waiting a word that 
would throw his men into position with 
taut muscles and wide-apart legs. 

"He is between the fifteenth and 
twentieth floors," the chief announc- 
ed, finally. "He is resting. There 
is smoke coming from the top of the 
ladder on the twentieth. He can't 
rest long." 

Five seconds had been enough for 
Finnegan, but when he made the next 
floor the chief saw that the second 
ladder he was hauling after him was 
blazing. This menacing little tongue 
of flame was made all the more distinct 
because of the fact that the search- 
light rays were now very faint. 

Finnegan managed to put out the fire 
on his scaling ladder. He smudgid it 
with hands that were covered with 
callouses from hard work until they 
were as if gloved with horn. He 
reached t he twenty-second floor, when 
again, the charred scaling ladder 'took 
lire. This lime he lost a good two feet 
of it before he could hi at out the name. 
Ai the twenty-third floor he was again 
compelled to stop to rest: again the 
ladder caught fire and again he put it 
out. The original eighteen-foot length 
of the ladder was now cut to fiftn n, 
having him barely enough to reach 
the window above on the twenty- 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



fourth floor. He still had the full 
length of the other ladder, although it, 
too, was charred at one end. 

Five minutes, full of the agony of 
suspense, and then there came from 
the dry lips of the chief a cry that was 
half a curse. It was the signal to the 
foreman of the net crew. 

Thirty of the most powerful men in 
the department sprang into position in 
a circle. The net drew taunt. 

Finnegan had reached a point just 
under the sill of the twenty-fourth 
floor and was groping for the twenty- 
fifth with his charred and burned 
scaling ladder. He could not reach it. 
He was trapped upon thp wall. 

Below the little Irishman was the 
great city of New York stretching in 
a panorama of lights. He could not 
look straight downward because of the 
gas fumes, from which he protected 
himself, as best he could, by breathing 
in the crook of his right arm. The 
burned ladder he had hooked to one of 
the crosspieces of the one he had in 
place above him on the twenty-fourth 
floor window sill. He would hold it in 
reserve. If his iron hook melted and 
began to sag too dangerously he would 
use the fragment of the other ladder 
to hang to for a while longer. 

He looked upward to see how his 
iron hook Was holding agairst the heat 
pouring over the fireproof sill. Some- 
thing strange caught his eye. A thin 
black object was dangling toward him 
from above, dodging the gas sheets as 
they shot from the window. He was 
getting help from above— from the 
twenty-fifth floor. There was some- 
thing doing for Finnegan. 

"Let it come! I gotcha, Steve!" he 
shouted at the top of his voice. 

He unloosened the stout rope about 
his waist, made one end fast under 
his armpits and reached for the black 
oliject that was being dangle'd to him. 
Hecaught.it and found it a homemade 
cord, fashioned of silks and ribbons 
and strips of wool and cotton, a prettj 
■enough thing for the tia'Uer of a har- 
lequin perhaps. butTiot strong enough 
for a fireman's wornbut^ody. He hai 
become skilled in watching and play- 
iae against the dangers of gas^filler 
windows, and he managed to get hi 
rope tied to the patchwork cord witl 
out having either burnidi n He gave si 



shout and the cord and rope were 
hauled until they were taut. 

Finnegan would have tried to scale 
the thin rope hand over hand, but 
every living thread in his body ached. 
Suddenly he felt a tug under his 
shoulders and his feet left the scaling 
ladder. His helmet, reversed, cover- 
ed his face. He held his breath as he 
swept upward through the flame. 
Then a black curtain dropped over his 
eyes. 

When he awakened he found him- 
self in a room crowded with men. 

"What's the matter?" he asked, 
sitting up. 

The room was filled with gas and he 
was choking. 

"Shut that door," he ordered. 
"It's the outside air that makes the 
gas take fire." 

He scrambled to his feet. 

A sensible working-fireman was in 
action. 

"Shut every door and window on 
the windward side." he commanded. 
"Leave just a little aircome in on the 
leeward. Be quick. Where you got 
the women? On the top floors? All 
right. Do the same thing up there, 
but do it in a hurry. This gas will 
burn out down below. Have you cut 
off the ventilators? No? All you 
men get busy and cut 'em off. 
Keep your eye on that rope for me. 
I'll take a look." 

Finnegan found half of the elevator 
shafts covered with roughly fashioned 
bulkheadsand keepingback thesmoke 
and fumes. Office furriture. books, 
rugs, carpets had been used for this. 
Blake, the superintendent, who had 
directed this work, was at his elbow. 

"'Come," said Finnegan, hurrying 
back to the room into which he had 
been drawn. "Write me a note— I 
don't spell much and when I do spell 
nobody can get me." 

Blake was ready with pencil and 
paper in a second. 

"Send up block and fall and one ax 
; n a hurry," Finnegan dictated. 
"Keep rope clear of windows. Get 
mattresses, bedding, boards to cut off 
elevator shafts from gas. Then we're 
all right. — Finnegan." 

The quick eyes of the fireman saw a 
long curtain pole stretched between 
two rooms of the office suite. He 



jumped for it and tore it free of its 
fastenings. With one of the rings he 
made a simple pulley attachmeut and 
through this passed the thin rope he 
had brought with him. 

Blake had put the message in a book 
and had made the book fast to the free 
end. Finnegan then put his curtain 
pole over the sill and extended it as 
far as he could away from the win- 
dows and to one side. Down shot the 
message. 

In a short while he got a signal from 
below. It meant for him to pull away. 
With quick, steady strokes he and a 
dozen men drew in the line. 

Hnnegan grabbed the ax as he 
would have grabbed a brotherhe had 
thought dead. With muscles, a clear 
head, a piece of steel well tempered, 
and a tough bit of wood with which to 
wield his steel, a fireman can tackle 
any phase of his enemy's fury. He 
found a massive director's table in ore 
of the offices. It was built of black 
oak. He knew the strength of English 
oak, and from this elegant piece of 
nonsense he cut a beam that would 
replace the curtain pole. To one end 
of this beam he soon had his block and 
fall made fast, and in a few minutes 
his thin rope was replaced w ith a thin 
steel hawser. 

When the earth end of this arrffr- 
ed at the window on the tvenn filth 
floor it brought the chief 1 in it If with 
a supply of boards and n aterials for 
making bulkheads. 

He had requisitioned from the 
wholesale houses hundreds of horse 
blankets, hales of felt irater'al ?id 
other stuff of the trade that wruld 
serve the needed purpose. Better 
still, once he was sure of the stout- 
ness of the overhanging oak piece and 
its fastenings, he could iut in use a 
hastily rigged platfoim which would 
bring his men after him and, if ne- 
cessity came, serve as a car for the 
rescue of the imprisoned. 

"Where's Blake," asked the chief, 
when he landed safely inside the 
building. 

"Here, Boss." 

Finnegan pointed out his whilom 
amanuensis. 

"Get busy with this stuff, and bulk- 
head the other shafts." ordered the 
chief. "I'm going to hitch a car to this 
block and fall and in ten minutes 
i here'll be a eompanv of men f o he lp. 
I'm e'oing' for them." 



Phone M«Till 4-H7 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Ak-'-nt Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



I Alcazar Theatre. 

Next Monday evening ." Madame 
Sherry" enters its third consecutive 
[week at the Alcazar. Responsibility 
lis divided for this gratifying success. 
The merit of the comedy itself is fa 
mous, and its interpretation by Ralph 
TIerz, Maude Amber, the Alcazar com- 
pany and the specially-engaged artists 
is excellent, to say nothing of the ef- 
fective choral and orchestra] auxilia- 
I tries. "A two-dollar show for one 
[dollar" is what the public pronounce 
I the performance. Since the opening 
performance of "Madame Sherry" the 

I' principals in the cast have constantly 
strengthened the magnetism by add- 
ing brightness and dialogue and in- 
terpolating bits of "business" that 
enhance the humor of the action. 
Those who witnessed any of the earlier 
presentations could now repeat their 
visit and find abundance of savings 
and doings to laugh at which they did 
not hear or see before. Meantime re- 
hearsals of "Miss Nobody from Star- 
land," another musical comedy, will 
,be continued daily until its prede- 
cessor is withdrawn. 

Empress Theatre. 

The feature olt'e ring for next week 
at the Empress, is the appearance of 
the Mirthful Mermaids, Miss Anna 
Norseraft. England's champion swim- 
mer and diver, and Miss Helena Gun- 
dreau, America's perfect physical 
culture girl. May Ward, "Vaude- 
ville's Live Wire Comedienne," will 
bring with her a new line of delight- 
ful songs, rendering them in her own 
Bnimitable manner. "His Nerve," a 
(Jriiiatic sketch necessitating four 
pe >'>le. tells the story of a burglar (if 
t H' R illl 's t,ype and an ordinary thief, 
bull] of whom have broken into the 
■a me house. Clark and MeCiillough, 
a ibio ' of .lt fo i < •.-•( 1 1 1 . ■ funsters, will 
eh use dull care to its corner and keep 
it i h"rt>. Klein Urot hers, a couple of 
G irm in comedians, will scramble the 
E ulish language into unrecognizable 
lius. Thus, ami Gerl rude K i i > r i< ■< ' \ . 
who won the prize wall/, contest at 
the M ulison Square Garden, will 
bffer so in- cl assic and ball room danc- 
ing The Bssepceascape and the Em- 
press Motion Pictures showing the 
crowds entering ihe theatre will com- 
plete the hill. 



REMOVAL NOTICE! 

San Francisco, California. 

Owing to business expansion and the ne- 
cessity for making better display of our 
goods we have taken new quarters at 127- 
129 Mission Street, and will occupy them on 
and after September 15, 1913. 

It is our purpose to have the largest and 
finest display of Fire Department Supplies 
on the Pacific Coast. 

Yours very truly, 



■'!A 



-,.'.. 



GORHAM FIRE APPARATUS CO. 

When You're Buyin 9 Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Sole Distributor for the Pncific Const S43 Oolilcn Hate A\cv. Pun Francisco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVKHY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK 10'fiti.r and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 
be matte payable, 
H. G. PRESTON I 

RIPTIl RATES 

One year, in advance .. ' 00 

■a ths 

adv^ehtiskmknts 

Inserted on the n.,rst lav, s aC a i n , ■ , . - ■ n . . 1 1 x laiKeand 
ones. 

I '.lit .,!■, Rooitis and Business Office, 179 Turk Street, 
Franklin 6867, 

Entered as second-class raatter'March 21, 1908. at the 
Postofficc it s >, t -ra-e-iseo. Pal., under the A et of Con- 
March S. 1S79. 



International Association Fire Engineers 

At 11:30 o'clock a. m. Monday. Sept. 1, the 
mouthers of tne association and maoj "I the 
Indies ace-drnparfying'tifem as«PiTimVri in frp>i"t 
of the Grand Central Palace and a group pno- 
tograph was taken They then mart-lied in- 
side to the convention kail. 

President MGhee said: "The forty-first 
annual convention of the Internatioiial Asso- 
ciation of Fire Engineers will please come to 
order. It is very gratifying to the members 
of the association, and more particular!) l f o 
the officers, to gee 
We think 



other commissioner we have had during my 
twenty-seven years' service in the depart- 
ment. I now have the honor to introduce 
Commissioner Johnson." 

Joseph Johnsftn, Fire Commissioner of the 
city of New York, said in pari: "Thai this 
is a genuine welcome you will see before the 
week is over. We are going to try to enier- 
tain you as befits the metropolis of the wes- 
tern world, and as becomes the city which has 
the larg.st uniformed fire fen,- in exi tence. 
We have not brought you here to teach you. 
RaJher are we fathered her* to learn from 
I othe>; That is to he the spirit of this 
week's assemblage of lire chiefs from the 
civilized nations of the earth. On behalf. 
Hereof, of the Mayor of New York City, and 
in his stead. I offer you the key of our muni- 
cipality, and with it t_M.es the respecl and ad- 
miration of the men you represent, who in 
land are waging a Itatlle that never 
ceases. " 



Advance Copies of Convention Papers. 

The Fireman's Herald of August oil says: 
"At Denver, last year. fprmerChief Lollerof 
Yuungsiown, the president of the Interna- 
tiona! A sociation of Fire Engineers, sug- 
that the incoming' -directors el' the or- 
ganization see wlnt her ii woiilo not be possi- 
ble lii h., - e I \ 1 E technical papers printed 
and distributed to members at the convention, 
as is Ihe practiceof the National Fire ! 

such an immense crowd technical I 

such an at Eeni/aiic'e wilf uuld ne rather an 



produce " I re a 6>| Hnd BSpfecYaltj at this expensive one, ii would, as Chief 1, oiler 



International Officers Elected. 

The convention of the International 'Asso- 
ciation of Fire Engineer- was adjourned after 
a session Friday, Sept. 5. New Orleans was 
selected as the next convention city, and these 
men were electi '1 officers: 

President, Thos Haney, Chief of Jackson- 
ville, Fla.: First Vice President, Hugh DelfB, 
i In. I ..I banning, Mich : Second Vice- Presi- 
dent, Harry L. Marston, Chief of Brockton, 
Mass ; Secretary, Jas. McFall, Chief of Roa- 
noke, Va.; Treasurer, Geo. Knofflocfc, Chief 

of Mansfield, Ohio 

- 

Merit System for Firemen. 

Portland, Ore., proposes to divide the city 
int.. three zones or districts and place the 
members of the fire department in Lhesedis- 
irtei- according to their re pective merits. 
This is the latest plan advanced in connection 
with the system drawn up for the standanu- 
zation of -alaries of city employes. 

The district in the down town section will 
have only the best men and salaries v. il 

Immediately around this district 
will he another with the salaries lower and 
outside ..f this will be the other zone where 
the salaries will be lowe.-t. 

r the proposed plan Ihe best in thi 
riu.ent will be kept in the down town ois- 
triot where fires are most frefljiesl ajld se- 
rious. If a man shiri ! liiln « he 
„,a. he moved i» the ..utsi.l. .n-irict v.iih 
i„, ,. 'I I..- Bjttrt. IB - i |>w tj( [Ji Bi i- 
l unity for aiivaec. .. 



coflt am. in, .vlie,',., 1 1 !;. t,. tl [Verts of 

the Mayor, the Fire Commission, l he chief of 
the hre department, so much has been so 
veil done to provide instruction and enter- 
tainment',' We lilce to see all present at bill 
business meetings; That is what we are here 
for. Our'cities pa\ ear expenses to 



pet. fed lift; . a more Intelligent follow- 
ing of thevartous topics on w hich papers are 
read, and a more informing general discus- 
sion would result. So far as We kl'OW the 

tot did not tale t hi- sub] . i up at all. 
Perhaps t he convent ion mighl give tie n at'er 
a few minutes' atteht i n, as ii is the i ruth 



pal 



conventions that We may gain knowledge of that mUch'OI tin- \ I'lli.-s.- p.| .!. i 



I,. ,.,.., i h. memhel s ate not prepared lo 
at . o- ■ t hem. " 

W e heal fjlj agree Will, lie jl-.v. aHll SKV 

fui-ib. r ha ill.- Pacific I-irui. n wi. I con- 



sider It a pi IVH.fr o' plilel h -pi. | IS 

por'ance and see that even chief 



Memorial Services. 



the best and most modern methods of fife 

atinn and extinguishment to the end 

that our departments at horde may have the 

benefit thereof, at.d It is proper that every 
member should be in attendance on all busi- 
ness meeting 

The proceedings were opened by prayer by Pacific - ' copy 

Chaplain Handel of the New Y'ork Fire De- 
partment. All present rose and stood during 
the invocation. 

chi„f ECenlon of New York City next spoke: 
"Mr. I' resident, Radio and I b-i.- I mat,. M, m 
r»'f the International Association of Fire 
Engineers. — As your president has said, it is 
very gratifying to us to see such a large at- 
tendance here this morning, and the more es- 
pe.-iallv since the weather is not verj 
for being tied up in a hall. 1 always felt and 
knew, that most people, parlicnlrrlj most 
anxious at some i me- :.. come 
and see the city of New York and to look 
nd its lire del. ailment. We have here 
tins morning the administrative head of th 
New Y'..rk Fire 'Department, Commission* 



The following is the program of the m 
rial services of the International Assocji lioji 

el In, El elneers, at Aeolian hall. New Y'ork 

City, September 2nd, 1 9 1 S : 
Organ Prelude- Mr Dion W. Kennedy. 
Opening Praycr-Bc\ Joseph P. Dinee.h, 
Duet-Mrs. Ruben H Mainzel and Mrs. 

Charlotte Eldi 
Address-Chief A V Bennett. 

Solo-Mr.-. Robert II. Mainzer. 
Orauoii-llr .1. C ' "\ le: 
Quartet— '"Nearer M.i GodToTh.e." Miss 
Mam- Sliiddarl. Miss Rose Bryant) Mr. Albert 
1 Quesn'el. Mi Cull r.l Cairns. 

t /, : 



Orga 



fullv say, done more to advance Ihe tni-tn. 
of fire prevention ami tire lighting than an 



PosLluoe— Dead March from Saul. 
[7 v .^ 



Subscribe for the Pacific Fireman. 



To Prevent Fire Panics in Thtatits. 

Ala conference held in New York,, at wl.uti. 
Fir. Commissioner Johnson ami lh< n nung. is 

of many city theatres discussed, ihe best 
methods of preventing a panic when the vr> 
of "Fire!" is raised in an aniustn.. nl re ■ h. 
it was decided that certain reforms he it i.i.ni- 
r. led at once, among which is a weekly hie 
,0,11 in which the employes of each fin 
w it] be compelled to take part. Separate 

.allies will he assigned lo each ush.l, U 
members ol 1 1. lo- ra. . t o lo the 

employes. By tin- mean- thi attai lies of the 
house win know exactly wha lo do whe.ii lie 
emergency arise-. Another suggestion which, 
however, was net official!} di ■ *"">.» 

that a number indicating ihe emergencj exit 

,o which ihe h erof a seal .-I Mild make his 

Mich a vva> as ; l ' "' 

!,.- seal nuiub-r. 1 ointnlssiolKl J' I 

urreel in' declaring thai whet 
is seized with P»J ''' **' '31V! ""• " S-' ' ' "' 

Ihe -ame Way he enleuu, aill - Ugll hi has 10 

oas's si r exits in dim g so.- r ire 

aVid W.nei E i ■-■ 

KOSENBLlMABRAhAM CO. Inc. 

TAILOkS i OR MEIN 

llllR MA-Ktl Js T. 

ODD KE1 I .' ' I PJNC 

Phone M«tt« 1503 

UNIFORMS OUR SPECIALTY UNION LABEL USED 



P A C I K I C KlKKMAN 



Meeting of the Fire Commission. 

The following recommendations by the Ad- 
ministrative Committee were approved: 

From W. T. Fields, hoseman engine 3, re- 
questing a leave of absence, with pay, with 
permission to leave the city, on account of 
sickness, to expire Oct. 1. Granted. 

From Battalion Chief Russell, requesting 
that he be allowed salary during disability, 
resulting from an injury to his foot, received 
in the discharge of duty Aug. 26. Allowed. 

From the Widows' andOtphans' and Mutual 
Aid Associations of the San Francisco Fire 
Department, requesting the sanction of the 
Board to the holding of the joint benefit con- 
cert and ball on Thanksgiving eve, and also 
that the members that so desire be given per- 
mission to sell tickets for the same. Request 
granted. 

From Battalion Chief Radford, submitting 
a complaint against Jas. McTernan, hoseman 
engine 13, for being under ihe influence of 
intoxicating liquor and for addressing vulgar 
language to him while on duty on July 9. 
Charges filed. 

From Battalion Chief Radford, submitting 
a complaint against Jas. Reynolds, stoker 
engine 32, for violation of the rules governing 
leaves of absence on account of sickness. 
Laid over to Tuesday, Sept. 16, 8:15 a. m. 

In the matter of the complaint against 
Frank Meacham, lieutenant truck 6. charged 
with failing to report for duty on time at the 
expiration of his meal hour on the 3rd inst.. 
your committee has furl her investigated this 
matter and Mr. Schmalz admits that he was 
mistaken in the dates of Meachum's visits to 
his office and that he visited his offire on both 
the 1st and 3rd inst. In view of this state- 
ment your committee recommend that the 
original recommendation that Meacham be 
deceived of one day's pay prevail. 

From the Pacific Motor Fire Apparatusand 
Siiu|.lvO"mi'any. requesting that some action 
be taken towards accepting the Webb double 
eighty chemical which has been tested several 
times by this department. Another test 
Saturday 2 p. m. 

Application of John J. McGrath, foreman 
horseshoer. for salary from Julv 8i h to Aug. 
1st, time off duty on account of sickness. 
I), nird. 



Monument to Heroic Firemen. 

Seven thousand fire-fighters, including more 
than 1500 men from the uniformed force of 
th" New York Fire Department, reinforced 
by delegations from Philadelphia. Baltimore, 
Pittsburgh and Portland. On'., and members 
of volunteer and exempt firemen's associa- 
tions, marcheo in parade Friday afternoon to 
Riverside Drive and lOllih street, where the 
Firemen's Memorial, suggesled by the lale 
Bishop Potter, and erected from subscriptions 
Collected through the New York Globe, was 
unveiled. Following the unveiling ceremo- 
nies, they passed in review before a large 
stand, where were assembled more than 10(10 
lire chiefs of the world, who have been at- 
tending the foriy-lirst annual convention and 



fire exposition of the International Associa- 
tion of Fire Engineers. 

The New York City Fire Department was 
represented in the parade by some forty pieces 
of apparatus, among which were the latest 
inventions in motor fire machines as well as 
the old-style horse-drawn apparatus. The 
Volunteer Firemen and Exempt Firemen's 
Associations, dressed uniformly in red shirts 
and navy blue trousers, drew after them the 
little hose carts and hand pumps used half a 
century ago in fire fighting. The oldest piece 
of fire apparatus in the parade was a hand- 
manipulated pump on four wheels, built 
in 1725. 

The monument is in the form of a votive 
tablet 25 feet high and 8 feet deep. It rests 
on a high foundation, flanked hy two marble 
groups representing Duty and Sacrifice. The 
monument is approached from the drive by a 
broad flight of steps leading up to a plaza, 
from which two flights of steps lead on either 
side of the monument. 

On the easterly side of the monument, fac- 
ing the street, is the dedication inscription; 

To the 

Men of the Fire Department of tKe City of New York. 

who died at the call of duty 

soldiers in a war that never ends 

this memorial is dedicated by the people 

of a grateful city. 

On the other face of the tablet is a bas re- 
lief 19 feet long and 8 feet high, representing 
the dash of a horse-drawn engine to a fire. 
Under this a large mask spouts a stream of 
water into a fountain basin. Between the 
bas relief and the mask is this inscription: 
To the 

Heroic dead of the Fire Department. 

Gorham-Seagrave Engine at Bakersfield 

Editor Pacific Fireman. 

Dear Sir:— In the Bakersfield Californian 
of August 25th, 1913. ap| ears an account of 
the loss by fire of A. W. Bannister's grain 
and feed warehouse, Bakersfield, and the 
work performed by the Gorham-Seagrave 
auto fire engine in connection therewith. The 
engine had not been formally accepted by the 
city, but was sent out to answer the alarm. 
Upon its arrival at the fire it was put to work 
and furnished two powerful fire streams 
through thirteen hut dred foot lines of fire 
hose for more than sixteen hours,^ thus de- 
monstrating its serviceability, as well as its ] 
dependability, as a piece of fire- fighting appa- 
ratus. The big machine never faltered or 
missed tire once, thus refuting the charge of 
officials of the S. F. F. Department that auto 
fire engines have not reached a stage of per- 
fection that justify their purchase by that 
depart nient. 

On September 3rd, at New York, In the 
presence of fire chiefs the worlo over, a 
Gorham Seagrave au'0 fire engine worked to 
more than its full rated capacity for twelve 
hours and finished with a perfect score and in 
perfect condition; another refutation of the 
charge of imperfection, (Jorham- Seagrave 
auto fire engines are good enough for any 
city in the world, including San Francisco. 
(' A. Tabkk. 

For Flowers for all occasions call up Mission 
50M8. J. J. O'Connor, 2756 Mission Street. 

^Michael Flannngnn, tillerman truck 6, while 
at Adams Springs on his vacation recently, 
was called upon to act as acolyte lo Father 
Long, owing to the illness of the regular 
acolyte. 



Portland's Fireboat All Right. 

Battalion Chief Stevens, after a number of 
trials, has submitted a report on the "David 
Campbell:" 

I respectfully report that, as per your in- 
structions, I have tested out the fireboat 
David Campbell with the following results: 

Monday, August 4, 4:45 p. m. — Mayor Albee 
and Chiefs Dowell, Laudenklos and Stevens 
on board. Were 22 minutes getting water. 

Friday, August 8, 5:30 a. m.— Got water in 
less than three minutes. 

Friday, August 8, 5:53 p. m. — Got water in 
less than three minutes, but failed to hold it. 
Engineer claimed this was caused by lack of 
assistance at vacuum pumps. 

Saturday, August 9, 9:55 a. m.— Got water 
inside three minutes and held same. 

Sunday, August 10, 5:05 a. m — Got water 
inside three minutes; used both pumps with 
good results. 

Sunday, August 10, 4:40 p. m.— Got water 
in three minutes. Used both pumps with boat 
tied up at dock and had seven streams with 
good results until the telegraph signal carried 
away (broke). 

VACUUM AND STEAM TESTED. 

Sunday, August 17, 9:16 a. m. — Went with 
boat for oil. Had good vacuum and steam 
but did not pump water on account of long 
trip for oil and necessity of keeping boat out 
of service too long. 

Monday, August 18, 5:45 a. m. — Got water 
in three minutes. 

Friday, August 22, 5:23 a. m.— Got water in 
three minutes but did not hold up pressure on 
account of lack of steam, although the fur- 
nace was so hot it burned all the paint off 
after stack. Probable cause, changes recently 
made in interior furnace construction. 

These tests were made without any notice 
to the captain or crew. The vacuum pump 
on one side is kept moving at all times now, 
also one pump is kept (stuffed up) ; tbat is, 
one-half of the pump works into the other 
half, thereby cutting the volume of water in 
half but doubling the pressure; this gives 
better results. 

The boat has worked satisfactorily at fires 
of late as follows: 

Aug. 5, 9:07 p. m.-28 Front street, Had 
necessary amount of steam and vacuum but 
was ordered to stand by. 

August 10, 2:12a. rn.-Footof Rossellstreet; 
houseboat; fire extinguished by fireltoat. 

August 18, 6:20 p. m.T Foot of Montgomery,-* 
street, Portland Shingle Mill. Boat worked 
line; tire practically extinguished by fireboat. 
although stokerscomplained of nol being able' 
to hold up steam at time of shutting down 
pumps'. 



Tcloph,,,, t).«,U. I*'" 

U. J. BORCK, '»' ' aii.or 

MAKF-S A M>F. I\l fV OF 

1-ll-JErVIEIN'S UNIFORMS 

also fim: (■mi i i.v SUITS ' 

')3 EDDY STKEfcT San FrannVro 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



American -La France Fire Engine Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 

151 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



Including Hose Wagons, Combination Chemical 
Engines and Hose Wagons, Chemical Engines. 
Pumping Engines, Hook and Ladder Trucks, etc 



Headquarters for Fire Department Tools and Equipment 

Babcock Fire Extinguishers, the Fire Department Standard 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed on request 



D 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FI.OUISTS... 

Fresh cut flowers and buquefcs always on hand. Alsu 

ornamental and flowering; plants in variety. 

Sjifrinl attention given to Wedding and Ptinerai Orders, 

ArHstic Decoration* <md Dottipns. 

Gardening, Ktc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

Tn Kkach Ni'iiSEitiEs. lake Castio street ear t<> 23rd, 

Mission, 21th street and Hoffman avenue far 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



brown&kennedy Howard Watches 

FLORAL 




SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



112 S. Spring Si. 

Los Angeles 



717 K Sireel 

Sacramento 



EAGLESON & CO. 



Imporle s and Manufacture 



MENS FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 

Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1118 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 



r>h™r Markrl 5417 



SAN FRANCISCO 



p. iHomrM 1615 
nicies, v| ark< ., i72 , 

FUNERAL WORK A SPECIALTY 

LOWF.ST PRICES 

3091 SIXTEENTH STREET 

NEAR VALENCIA 
UNION STORE SAN FRANCISCO 

Ttk-pr.oneDou8la s 287l 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKHRS 



Phone Douglas 4716 



Home C 2458 



77 TMIWD STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



FOR the man in any line who plans to achieve, who • - 
pects to win high place in his chosen calling then 
could be no better investment ihan a HOW AMU 
Watch. Living with a HOWARD is the Rarest m 
al sorb the accuracy, the punctuality, and practical tin • - 
saving that America's successful men denial d usa mat* 
ter of course. 

Nut every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Wnl< 
I ind the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk lo 
him. H«- is a good man to know. 

\ Howard Watch is always worth what you 
p iv for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, an.l a printed ticket attached— from I 
17-j. u ■■ 1 -double rotten in a Crescent Extra m 
i: 3 p Extra gold-filled case at *4 I. to thi 
jewel at 5150 — and the Edward Howard mod 
at ?3r>o. 

Admiral Sigsbee has written a little i 

"The Log nf (he Howard Watch." giving the 
record of his own Howard in the U, S Na\.\ 
Yon' 1 enjoy it. Ds »p us ;i post-card. D>e»rt\ N. 

and we'll send yoU a copy. 

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T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AIND JK\N KLRV 

71 WAIJ.FR ST.. 



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HATS, UNDKRWEAK, RTC 

NAVY FLANNEL REGULATION SHIRTS 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Genls' Furnishing Goods 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



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VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 

1155 OOI.DHN GATE AVI.. 
Telephones Park 117 and 118 S*n Francisco, Cwl 



The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIK Proprietor 

The BEST TAILOR-MADE FIREMEN'S SHIRTS 

OUR sr/riA/.Tr 
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